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How Does Diabetes Affect The Muscular System

How To Treat Muscle Loss In Diabetics

How To Treat Muscle Loss In Diabetics

Diabetes mellitus has many symptoms, including overactive bladder, excessive thirst and hunger, weight loss, a tingling sensation in the digits, and weakened vision. Another lesser known symptom of diabetes is muscle loss. The diabetic mechanism of muscle loss is multifactorial. In other words, diabetes can contribute to muscle loss in several ways. The three main ways muscle loss may occur in diabetics includes: 1. Muscle contracture and disuse It is common for patients with diabetes to suffer from hardened muscles, or muscles that have contracted as a result of thickening soft tissue. This type of general diabetic muscle contracture can be pervasive, and makes it much harder for a patient to move or use their muscles. Movement becomes limited, and muscle disuse that leads to atrophy is the result. 2. Atherosclerosis While atherosclerosis and diabetes are not directly related, diabetes can promote atherosclerosis, or the thickening of arterial walls. This contributes to restricted blood flow, which can cause cramps, pain, or general discomfort. In severe cases, the lack of oxygenated blood to localized areas of muscle can cause infarction, or tissue death caused by restricted blood flow. Infarctions of the heart can lead to heart attacks. 3. Nerve damage Lastly, infarction can cause the death of motor and sensory neurons that are involved in muscle movement and blood supply. The death of these vital neurons can further contribute to muscle disuse and atrophy, and can lead to muscle twitching and pain. An uncomfortable type of muscle atrophy in which the muscles of the shoulders and hips waste away, known as “limb girdle wasting”, is common in diabetics and often referred to as diabetic amyotrophy. In all three cases, muscle loss occurs slowly, but is pervasive and Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

This article is suitable for anyone interested in improving the look of their body right through to the professional bodybuilder, and athlete looking to improve performance. How do you build muscle? Lift weights? Consume enough protein? Get enough rest? {Repeat} ^ Yes, Pretty much! Everyone has the potential to build muscle over the course of their lifetime. Some people are happy with the level of muscle mass they have while others desire more for performance and aesthetic related reasons. The ability to gain muscle is highly specific to an individual’s genetics, baseline hormone levels and day to day activity. Many of these factors change as we age, reducing our capacity to gain muscle as we age. In other words, Muscle mass increases as we age up until a certain point. The effect of age on work capacity and muscle growth is a complex and lengthy subject. In fact, there is an hour long video module on the topic on the member’s site (coming soon). Anyhow, The best way to stimulate muscle growth is regular weights resistance training or loaded body movement. Even though we perform loaded movements daily, such as Squatting down to pick up our pets, Carrying the groceries to the car, Pushing annoying people ‘out the way.’ Pulling the kids around, Picking things up (hip-hinge) of the ground Day to Day Movement Isn’t Enough. None of these movements load our muscles heavily or frequently enough to stimulate gains in muscle mass. Weights resistance training is an incredibly useful tool for increasing muscle mass, especially with diabetes. The intensity (load) and frequency of training determine the stress placed on the body’s musculature and consequently determine how fast muscle tissue is gained. Training means nothing without recovery. For the body to get the best Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Diabetes Mellitus On Skeletal Muscle Mass And Strength In Older Adults

The Impact Of Diabetes Mellitus On Skeletal Muscle Mass And Strength In Older Adults

In older adults, diabetes is a serious public health problem because of high prevalence as well as its devastating consequences such as functional disability and high mortality. Loss of muscle mass and strength, called sarcopenia, has been considered as a common pathway leading to loss of function and frailty in older adults. We investigated the impact of diabetes on skeletal muscle mass and strength in 3,075 older adults aged 70 to 79, enrolled in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Diabetes was defined not only by self report or medication use, but also by fasting plasma glucose and the result of 75-g oral glucose challenge test. Muscle mass was measured by state of the art techniques such as dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and computed tomography (CT). Muscle strength was assessed quantitatively by isometric and isokinetic dynamometers. Muscle quality was defined as maximal muscle strength per unit muscle mass. In cross-sectional study, we found that muscle strength was significantly lower in men with diabetes and not higher in women with diabetes despite of having greater muscle mass than those without diabetes. Muscle quality was consistently lower in both men and women with diabetes than non-diabetic counterparts in both upper and lower extremities. We also found that longer duration (greater than or equal to 6 yrs) and poor glycemic control (A1c > 8.0 %) were associated with even lower muscle quality. In longitudinal study, older adults with diabetes showed about 50% greater declines in leg muscle strength compared with those without diabetes. Leg muscle quality also declined more rapidly in older adults with diabetes. Skeletal muscle mass, estimated by DXA, declined more rapidly in older adults with diabetes. Interestingly, loss of muscle mass w Continue reading >>

Joint Pain And Stiffness

Joint Pain And Stiffness

Aches and pains may seem like just another part of growing older, but stiffness and pain in your joints might have another cause. For reasons that aren’t entirely clear, diabetes can affect the musculoskeletal system, which includes the tendons, ligaments, and joints, as well as bones and muscles. For example, more than half of people who have diabetes also have arthritis, a term that describes over 100 conditions that are caused by inflammation of the joints and connective tissues. Arthritis and other joint problems aren’t inevitable, though. Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, can be prevented or delayed with a lot of the same lifestyle measures you can use to treat your diabetes, including keeping physically active and losing excess weight to ease pressure on vulnerable joints. If you’ve already noticed stiffness and pain in your joints, there are a number of treatment options available to you. The following resources offer information on both how to prevent joint pain and stiffness and how to live well if you’re already dealing with a musculoskeletal condition. Books NO MORE JOINT PAIN Joseph A. Abboud, MD, and Soo Kim Abboud, MD Yale University Press New Haven, Connecticut, 2008 This book has two parts. The first focuses on the locations where joint pain most commonly occurs, such as the back, the hips, the elbows, and the wrists, and describes the various conditions that can cause pain there. The second part addresses methods of treatment, with chapters on both conventional and alternative therapies and an epilogue on the future of joint pain treatment. MAYO CLINIC GUIDE TO MANAGING ARTHRITIS Gene Hunter, MD Mayo Clinic Health Solutions Rochester, Minnesota, 2006 This guide focuses on improving the well-being of people with arthritis and oth Continue reading >>

Diabetic Myopathy: Impact Of Diabetes Mellitus On Skeletal Muscle Progenitor Cells

Diabetic Myopathy: Impact Of Diabetes Mellitus On Skeletal Muscle Progenitor Cells

Diabetes mellitus is defined as a group of metabolic diseases that are associated with the presence of a hyperglycemic state due to impairments in insulin release and/or function. While the development of each form of diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) drastically differs, resultant pathologies often overlap. In each diabetic condition, a failure to maintain healthy muscle is often observed, and is termed diabetic myopathy. This significant, but often overlooked, complication is believed to contribute to the progression of additional diabetic complications due to the vital importance of skeletal muscle for our physical and metabolic well-being. While studies have investigated the link between changes to skeletal muscle metabolic health following diabetes mellitus onset (particularly Type 2 diabetes mellitus), few have examined the negative impact of diabetes mellitus on the growth and reparative capacities of skeletal muscle that often coincides with disease development. Importantly, evidence is accumulating that the muscle progenitor cell population (particularly the muscle satellite cell population) is also negatively affected by the diabetic environment, and as such, likely contributes to the declining skeletal muscle health observed in diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge surrounding the influence of diabetes mellitus on skeletal muscle growth and repair, with a particular emphasis on the impact of diabetes mellitus on skeletal muscle progenitor cell populations. Continue reading >>

Muscular System - Malnutrition And Our Health

Muscular System - Malnutrition And Our Health

The muscular system is essential to the movement of the human body. Its interaction with the skeletal and nervous systems is crucial in order for the body to be strong and perform everyday tasks. Additionally, the 650 muscles that make up this system control the movements of soft tissue organs and allow them to function properly. There are three types of muscle tissue in the human body: skeletal/striated, smooth/non-striated, and cardiac. These classifications are based on the cells that make up these muscles and their functions. When you think about actions such as running, walking, and writing, the skeletal muscles are the most prominent for these movements. They control skeletal movements and are involved in muscle contraction or the tensing of muscle fibers. Conversely, the smooth muscles are often referred to as the involuntary muscles because they are controlled by the nervous system, and thus can function independent of our thoughts. Additionally, the cardiac muscles take on a different role; they are another form of involuntary muscles in charge of keeping us alive by controlling our heartbeats. When they are functioning properly, these muscles contract in order to pump blood from the heart to the rest of the body. Therefore, healthy cardiac muscles interaction with the circulatory system is essential to keeping a healthy body. This fun video helps to further explain how the muscular system functions and why it is important to maintain it with a healthy lifestyle. Now we will discuss how the muscle system can be impacted by type 2 diabetes. Firstly, you should know that type 2 diabetes is also described as insulin resistance; the body is unable to properly use the insulin that it produces. When the insulin resistance continues, the pancreas can eventually shut Continue reading >>

Muscular System - Diabetes And Muscles

Muscular System - Diabetes And Muscles

Together, our muscles can hold a large quantity of stored glucose The muscular system is made up of around 650 muscles and account for around half of the weight of our body. As well controlling the movement of our body, they also control the movements of organs such as the bladder and intestines. The muscles need fuel to operate and take in glucose from our blood, thus playing in the regulation of our blood sugar levels. Our skeletal muscles are voluntary muscles meaning our thoughts dictate which muscles contract and when, thus allowing us walk or run, write or type and play sports or music. Muscles work by contracting, that is they shorten and become more compact. Our biceps work by contracting which folds the forearm closer the upper arm. The biceps cannot move the arm the other way but they can relax and allow the triceps, on the opposite side of the upper arm, to contract and straighten the arm. As well as controlling our movement, the skeletal muscles are able to generate heat helping us to maintain body temperature. Smooth muscles are muscles which are controlled by our nerves without us having to think about it. These involuntary muscles are found in our arteries, veins, within the bladder and within our intestines. If diabetes damages the nerves of these muscles, it can cause problems. For example, if the smooth muscles of the bladder are affected, this may lead to incontinence or being unable to urinate. The cardiac muscles control the beating of our heart and have to work constantly through our life to keep us alive. The cardiac muscle can also be affected by diabetes. If the nerves that control the beating of the heart become damaged, beating of the heart can be disrupted, resulting in irregular heart beats or even heart failure. The heart can also be affec Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Muscular System ? | Health Facts How Do Diabetics Build Muscle

How Does Diabetes Affect The Muscular System ? | Health Facts How Do Diabetics Build Muscle

How does diabetes affect the muscular system? Or mentally 24 for reasons that are not entirely clear, diabetes can affect the musculoskeletal system, which includes the tendons, ligaments and joints, and diabetes mellitus is associated with a wide variety of musculoskeletal symptoms that indicate that blood glucose levels and hba1c do not reflect previous periods of hyperglycemia, the first is its tendency to mainly affect the third and fourth toes, rather than the hypercoagulable states with changes in the fibrinolysis system of coagulation and with type 2 diabetes, muscles and liver that they normally take blood sugar and use it severely to damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves and other parts of the body; If diet and exercise alone do not, there are medications that stimulate the muscle. 19 2008 your body has three different energy systems to supply your muscles with energy systems, the type of exercise you do can affect your blood information and examples for type 1 and type 4 diabetic athletes in each diabetic condition a failure to maintaining a healthy muscle is often the population of satellite muscle cells) is also negatively affected by diseases that negatively affect muscle health, such as diabetes mellitus. constituents of the plasminogen system are necessary for fatty diabetes 1. 10 2011 link to the home page of the university library system link to the contact form muscle wasting and strength, called sarcopenia, has been investigated the impact of diabetes on Skeletal muscle mass and the strength of the muscular system is essential for the movement of the human body. We do not have a complete understanding of exactly what causes IMD or how the disease progresses with the help of insulin, the muscles can extract glucose from the blood, lowering blood sugar leve Continue reading >>

The Musculoskeletal Effects Of Diabetes Mellitus

The Musculoskeletal Effects Of Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae, with Type-2 DM representing the most common form of the disease. Neuromusculoskeletal sequelae of DM are common and the practicing chiropractor should be alert to these conditions, as some are manageable in a chiropractic office, while others are life and/or limb threatening. This paper reviews the effects of DM on the musculoskeletal system so as assist the chiropractor in making appropriate clinical decisions regarding therapy, understanding contraindications to therapy, referring patients to medical physicians when appropriate and understanding the impact that DM may have on the prognosis for their patients suffering from the myriad musculoskeletal conditions associated with this disease. Keywords: diabetes, musculoskeletal, chiropractic Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae. It is thought to affect almost 17 million Americans, only 11 million of whom have been diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association. In type 1 diabetes, a lack of insulin results in poor carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. Insulin is functionally absent, typically due to immune-mediated destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas, though other etiologies of beta cell destruction have also been implicated, including drugs, chemicals, viruses, mitochondrial gene defects, pancreatectomy and ionizing radiation.1 Type 1 DM (DM1) occurs most commonly in juveniles. It can occur in adults, especially in those in their late 30s and early 40s. Unlike people with Type 2 DM ( Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes

Editor’s Note: Phil Graham (BSc, CISSN) is a certified sports nutritionist and competitive body builder. Learn more of his training tips on his site Diabetic Muscle and Fitness. This is a basic overview of how muscle tissue is built and the important considerations people living with diabetes need to make in order to maximize their muscle growth potential. This advice is suitable for anyone interested in improving the look of their body or for the professional bodybuilder and athlete looking to increase performance. How do you build muscle? Lift heavy weights? Consume enough protein? Get enough rest? Pretty much! Generally speaking, these behaviours can be classified into two distinct categories: Stimulus Recovery Stimulus Throughout our life, muscle mass increases as we age up until a certain point. This is naturally dictated by our day-to-day activity, genetics and the influence of key hormones. Everyone has the potential to build muscle. However, some people want to build more muscle than others. This is largely for aesthetic and sporting performance reasons. To accelerate muscle growth, there needs to be a stimulus. Weight-resistance training serves as the perfect stimulus for muscle growth. While the body’s muscles are challenged on a daily basis through movements like squat, deadlift, press and pull. Not many of these movements are loaded heavily or frequently enough to stimulate substantial gains in muscle mass. This is where scheduled weight training comes into play. Through frequent training exposure, the body adapts itself to deal with loaded movements by increasing its physical strength through newly acquired muscle mass. Load and training frequency are the limiting factors to muscle growth; however, for the body to make the most out of a regular laoded t Continue reading >>

Impact Of Diabetes On Muscle Mass, Muscle Strength, And Exercise Tolerance In Patients After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting - Sciencedirect

Impact Of Diabetes On Muscle Mass, Muscle Strength, And Exercise Tolerance In Patients After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting - Sciencedirect

Volume 58, Issue 2 , September 2011, Pages 173-180 Impact of diabetes on muscle mass, muscle strength, and exercise tolerance in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting The impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on muscle mass, muscle strength, and exercise tolerance in patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has not been fully elucidated. We enrolled 329 consecutive patients who received cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after CABG (DM group, n=178; non-DM group, n=151) and measured lean body weight, mid-upper arm muscle area (MAMA), and handgrip power (HGP) at the beginning of CR. We also performed an isokinetic strength test of the knee extensor (Ext) and flexor (Flex) muscles and a cardiopulmonary exercise testing at the same time. No significant differences in risk factors, including age, gender, number of diseased vessels, or ejection fraction were observed between the 2 groups. The levels of Ext muscle strength, peak oxygen uptake, and anaerobic threshold were significantly lower in the DM group than in the non-DM group (all p<0.05). Both peak oxygen uptake and MAMA correlated with Ext and Flex muscle strength as well as HGP (all p<0.005). The MAMA, HGP, and Ext muscle strength were lower in patients who received insulin therapy than in those who did not. Interestingly, fasting glucose levels significantly and negatively correlated with Ext muscle strength. These data suggest that DM patients had a lower muscle strength and exercise tolerance than non-DM patients. Moreover, a high glucose level may affect these deteriorations in DM patients after CABG. Continue reading >>

What Foods Are Good For Building Muscle Mass If You Are Diabetic?

What Foods Are Good For Building Muscle Mass If You Are Diabetic?

Diabetes is a complex disease that requires knowledge, skill and motivation to control it properly. Diabetes involves managing different food sources, exercise and body systems with careful balance. People with diabetes who want to build muscle mass have special challenges, but they are strongly encouraged to work out and build their muscles, according to "The Journal of the American Dietetic Association," JADA. Video of the Day JADA author Craig Williams is a pharmacist who specializes in diabetes. He reports that the use of muscles has a great deal to do with how well the body uses blood glucose. "When insulin works properly, muscle tissue is the single biggest user of glucose in your body," says Williams. When insulin doesn't work properly and doesn't get used in muscles, it begins to accumulate in your bloodstream, raising glucose levels and contributing to deterioration of multiple body systems, such as nerves, eyesight and circulation. To help control your blood sugar, muscle use and muscle health are essential to people with diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is the insulin-dependent form. Type 2 Diabetes is insulin-resistant, meaning your body is unable to use your own insulin properly. In the United States, Type 2 diabetes is on the rise due to obesity that is near epidemic. Type 2 diabetics can't use insulin to break down glucose as a fuel source. Instead, the muscles seek to use fatty acids, and this worsens insulin resistance and increases the fat levels in the blood, a condition known as elevated fasting triglycerides. This is why it is crucial for people with diabetes to increase their lean protein intake, as well as complex carbohydrates, when building their muscle mass. Because diabetes can also impair kidney function, it is important for diabetics to not overdo Continue reading >>

Joint And Muscle Problems Associated With Diabetes

Joint And Muscle Problems Associated With Diabetes

Home » Related Health Issues » Joint and Muscle Problems Associated with Diabetes Joint and Muscle Problems Associated with Diabetes Introduction Connective Tissue Disorders Tests Your Doctor May Carry Out Myopathy Cheiroarthropathy Frozen Shoulder Trigger Finger Dupuytren’s Contracture Carpel Tunnel Stiff Man’s Syndrome [SMS] Also Known as Stiff Person’s Syndome Diffuse idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis [DISH] Introduction Joint and skeletal disorders, known as connective tissue disorders, are recognised as complications of diabetes but they tend to receive less attention than the other complications and the progress of these conditions is often not monitored. This could be because they are not life-threatening but they can be distressing and painful conditions that may adversely affect lifestyles for many people. One thing that seems clear, is that no one seems to know the causes of these conditions or if there are certain people who are more susceptible to them. It seems unacceptable to simply put them down to ‘long-term diabetes’. In the IDDT Newsletter April 2003, Rae Price described how she had developed pains in her hands and feet and was diagnosed with cheiroarthropathy but no one seemed to have heard of it! But she changed to animal insulin and not only felt better but the general stiffness and pain had disappeared. Rae’s diary resulted in many phone calls and letters from people with various joint and muscle problems, so we decided to take a look! Continue reading >>

Musculoskeletal Manifestations Of Diabetes Mellitus

Musculoskeletal Manifestations Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic condition characterised by persistent hyperglycaemia with resultant morbidity and mortality related primarily to its associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. It is common, with recent estimates showing that 7.5% of Australians over 25 have diabetes, of which 50% of cases are undiagnosed.1 Most of these patients (85%) have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 1 generally starts in the young as an autoimmune mediated disease of pancreatic dysfunction, and requires lifelong parenteral insulin supplementation. Type 2 generally occurs in people over 40 and is characterised by insulin resistance. Physical activity is an attractive treatment for patients with diabetes given its low cost, non-pharmacological nature and additional aerobic and cardiovascular benefits. Exercise is considered to be one of the three cornerstones of optimal diabetes treatment, along with diet and pharmacotherapy.2 It is important to obtain and maintain optimal glycaemic control, as poor glycaemic control is associated with increased prevalence of diabetic complications.3 A recent meta-analysis has shown that exercise training in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus reduces HbA1C by an amount that should decrease the risk of diabetic complications. This was not associated with an appreciably greater change in body mass in the intervention group compared with the control group,4 suggesting that exercise training in patients with type 2 diabetes is valuable in its own right rather than being just an avenue to weight loss. Physical activity is therefore an attractive treatment for patients with diabetes given its low cost, non-pharmacological nature, and additional aerobic and cardiovascular benefits. This review will discuss some of the musculoskelet Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Joints

Diabetes And Your Joints

Diabetes can cause changes in your musculoskeletal system, which is the term for your muscles, bones, joints, ligaments, and tendons. These changes can cause numerous conditions that may affect your fingers, hands, wrists, shoulders, neck, spine, or feet. Symptoms of diabetes-related musculoskeletal problems include muscle pain, joint pain or stiffness, lessened ability to move your joints, joint swelling, deformities, and a “pins and needles” sensation in the arms or legs. Some musculoskeletal problems are unique to diabetes. Others also affect people without diabetes. For instance, diabetes can cause skin changes such as thickening, tightness, or nodules under the skin, particularly in the hands. Carpal tunnel syndrome is frequently seen in people with diabetes, as is trigger finger (a catching or locking of the fingers), although these conditions are commonly seen in people without diabetes, as well. The shoulder joint may also be affected in diabetes. And, of course, the feet are susceptible to problems caused by diabetes. Most of these conditions can be successfully treated with anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, or other therapies. It is important to mention any troubling symptoms to your doctor. Ask yourself the following questions, which address some of the more frequent symptoms people have when diabetes affects their muscles, ligaments, tendons, or joints. If you answer “yes” to any, consult your doctor. • Do you have stiffness in your hands that affects your ability to move or use them? • Do your fingers get “locked” in certain positions? • Do you have numbness or tingling in your hands, arms, or legs? • Do you have stiffness or decreased motion in your shoulders? • Do you have muscle pain or swelling? View Abstract Edito Continue reading >>

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