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How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System

Diabetic Gastroparesis

Diabetic Gastroparesis

If you have diabetes, you may have noticed that your digestion isnt quite what it used to be. The connection isnt obvious, but diabetes can damage the nervous system in ways that show up in the form of stomach or bowel problems. Its sometimes referred to as diabetic gastroparesis. In gastroparesis, also called delayed gastric emptying, the stomach takes too long to empty its contents. Heres how it works. The autonomic nervous systemthe part of the nervous system that automatically regulates our internal organs while we go about our lives controls the movement of food through the digestive tract. Normally, the vagus nerve, which controls the muscles of the stomach, tells the muscles to contract after a meal or snack to break up food and move it along to the small intestine. But if the vagus nerve is damaged, the muscles of the stomach dont work normally, and the movement of food slows or even grinds to a halt. Diabetes is the most common known cause of gastroparesis.Type 1 and type 2 diabetes can damage the vagus nerve if blood glucose levels stay high for too long.How? High blood glucosecauses chemical changes in nerves and damages the blood vessels that bring them much-needed oxygen and nutrients. While theres no cure for gastroparesis, treatment can help manage the condition. Signs and symptoms may be mild or severe and can include: Symptoms might be worse after eating greasy or rich foods or large quantities of high-fiber foods (such as raw fruits and vegetables) or drinking carbonated drinks or high-fat beverages. In some people, symptoms occur frequently; in others, they happen only occasionally. They may also vary in intensity over time. Food in the stomach can harden and cause nausea, vomiting, and obstruction. Gastroparesis can also cause malnutrition due to po Continue reading >>

Prevent Complications

Prevent Complications

Diabetes can affect any part of your body. The good news is that you can prevent most of these problems by keeping your blood glucose (blood sugar) under control, eating healthy, being physical active, working with your health care provider to keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control, and getting necessary screening tests. How are cholesterol, triglyceride, weight, and blood pressure problems related to diabetes? How can I be "heart healthy" and avoid cardiovascular disease if I have diabetes? How can I keep my eyes healthy if I have diabetes? How can I keep my kidneys healthy if I have diabetes? Why is it especially important to take care of my feet if I have diabetes? What should I do on a regular basis to take care of my feet? Continue reading >>

Video: How Diabetes Affects Your Blood Sugar

Video: How Diabetes Affects Your Blood Sugar

Your body uses glucose for energy. Glucose metabolism requires insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas. Here's how normal glucose metabolism works, and what happens when you have diabetes — a disease where your body either can't produce enough insulin or it can't use insulin properly. The food you eat consists of three basic nutrients: carbohydrates, protein and fat. During digestion, chemicals in your stomach break down carbohydrates into glucose, which is absorbed into your bloodstream. Your pancreas responds to the glucose by releasing insulin. Insulin is responsible for allowing glucose into your body's cells. When the glucose enters your cells, the amount of glucose in your bloodstream falls. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas doesn't secrete insulin — which causes a buildup of glucose in your bloodstream. Without insulin, the glucose can't get into your cells. If you have type 2 diabetes, your pancreas secretes less insulin than your body requires because your body is resistant to its effect. With both types of diabetes, glucose cannot be used for energy, and it builds up in your bloodstream — causing potentially serious health complications. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Digestion

Diabetes And Your Digestion

Diabetes can cause problems associated with digestion in your stomach as the result of a condition called gastroparesis. Literally, gastroparesis means "paralysis of the stomach," but it is much more than that. First, let's understand how the stomach works. In the stomach, the stimulation of the vagus nerve causes contractions that help to crush food into small particles and mix it up with the acids and enzymes that break down food. The contractions of the stomach then propel the food out of the stomach a little at a time through a valve (pyloric sphincter) that opens into the small intestine. It may take up to 4 hours to empty food from the stomach into the intestine. A meal containing a high amount of fat slows down the process. In people with diabetes, gastroparesis may be caused by damage of the vagus nerve when blood sugar has been high for a period of years. As a result of the damage, the food that enters the stomach is not pulverized and sits in the stomach for a longer period of time. Gastroparesis symptoms can include bloating, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, a feeling of fullness soon after starting a meal, weight loss, and heartburn. Secretions of enzymes and acids from the stomach lining still occur, but they contribute to nausea and vomiting when the food hasn't been crushed into small particles. If vomiting does occur, the food may come up in much the same condition as it went down. Gastroparesis can create a vicious cycle in the control of blood sugar. Food that is not digested properly can make blood sugar difficult to control. In return, poor blood sugar control worsens gastroparesis by promoting slow stomach emptying. Therefore, blood sugar control plays an important role in preventing and managing gastroparesis. The symptoms of gastroparesis can be Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System

How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System

How Does Diabetes Affect the Digestive System? Diabetes is an illness that occurs inside the body when either there is a lack of insulin or when the body does not respond to the insulin that the pancreas produces. Needless to say, a lack of insulin caused by diabetes has a negative effect on digestion. After all, the digestive system is complex enough without diabetes being involved. Usually, when people and medical professionals talk about diabetes, they concentrate on the effects that it has on other parts of the body like the eyes or the feet. They usually ignore the digestive system. Therefore, as a result, some people may find themselves asking, “How does diabetes affect the digestive system?” Diabetes can affect the digestive system in several ways. One very important function that diabetes affects is digestion. Every living being needs to be able to properly digest food in order to nourish the body, create energy and repair the body. Diabetes damages the nerves in the body by constantly elevating the blood sugar. Digestion is a process that is automatically controlled by the nervous system. As a result, ailments such as diarrhea, heartburn and constipation can disrupt the digestion process. Because of this, the body cannot properly absorb the nutrients from the food. Ultimately, this can cause the energy levels in the body to be extremely low. This often leads to inactivity, which can lead to obesity and being overweight. Oddly enough, many diabetics are obese or overweight because of they have an excessive amount of blood sugar. However, the cells in their bodies are extremely malnourished. Diabetes can also affect the immune system and cause it to respond much slower to pathogens. As a result, the body becomes more vulnerable to infections and illnesses. Ne Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

When you hear the word “diabetes,” your first thought is likely about high blood sugar. Blood sugar is an often-underestimated component of your health. When it’s out of whack over a long period of time, it could develop into diabetes. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Here’s what symptoms may occur to your body when diabetes takes effect. Diabetes can be effectively managed when caught early. However, when left untreated, it can lead to potential complications that include heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, and nerve damage. Normally after you eat or drink, your body will break down sugars from your food and use them for energy in your cells. To accomplish this, your pancreas needs to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin is what facilitates the process of pulling sugar from the blood and putting it in the cells for use, or energy. If you have diabetes, your pancreas either produces too little insulin or none at all. The insulin can’t be used effectively. This allows blood glucose levels to rise while the rest of your cells are deprived of much-needed energy. This can lead to a wide variety of problems affecting nearly every major body system. The effects of diabetes on your body also depends on the type you have. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, also called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an immune system disorder. Your own immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, destroying your body’s ability to make insulin. With type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to live. Most people are diagnosed as a child or young adult. Type 2 is related to insulin resistance. It used to occur i Continue reading >>

Which Systems Of The Body Are Affected By Diabetes?

Which Systems Of The Body Are Affected By Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which inadequate production of the hormone insulin or a resistance to its actions in the body can lead to high blood sugar levels. Insulin is needed to get sugar into cells of the body, where it is used for energy. When sugar cannot get into cells, it remains in the blood at high levels. Complications of diabetes arise from long-term exposure to high blood sugar. The cardiovascular, nervous, visual and urinary systems are most commonly affected by chronically high blood sugars. Video of the Day The cardiovascular system includes the heart and blood vessels. High blood sugar and increased blood fat levels commonly found in people with diabetes contribute to fatty deposits called plaques on the inner walls of blood vessels, causing inflammation. This leads to decreased blood flow and hardening of the blood vessels called atherosclerosis. High blood sugar also results in glycation, where sugars attach to proteins, making them sticky. This occurs on proteins found in blood vessels, also resulting in inflammation. When this occurs in the heart, it can lead to cardiovascular disease. According to a 2016 report from the American Heart Association, 68 percent of people with diabetes older than 65 die of heart disease. Nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy is common in people with diabetes. Symptoms typically appear after several years but may be present when diabetes is diagnosed, as the disease may have gone undetected for many years. Diabetic nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy is most common in the legs and feet. According to a 2005 statement by the American Diabetes Association, up to 50 percent of people with diabetes have peripheral neuropathy. This typically starts as numbness or tingling that progresses to loss of p Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Here Are The Common Type 1-related Digestive Issues

Here Are The Common Type 1-related Digestive Issues

People with Type 1 diabetes have a higher risk of gastrointestinal problems than the average population. Some of these issues may arise from frequent fluctuations in blood glucose levels that come with a diabetes diagnosis, while others may be related to the very medications that help with blood glucose regulation. Another likely reason for gastrointestinal issues (GI) may be the same overactive immune system which caused beta cell destruction in the first place. Its important to note that some of these conditions may play havoc on your blood glucose levels, which can lead to a vicious cycle, so its important to work with your healthcare team to identify and treat issues as they arise. GI issues related to less-than-optimal glucose control include heartburn, gastroesophageal reflux and gastroparesis (AKA delayed stomach emptying). All of these are thought to be related to damage to the autonomic nerves that help control the flux of food into and out of the stomach and into the intestines. Once damaged, the nerves may cause a delay in stomach emptying or food to back up into the esophagus. There are medications and insulin dosing strategies that can assist with management of these, but the best strategy to first pursue is prevention by optimizing your blood glucose management. Some medications that are on the market to aid with diabetes management also have an effect on the digestive system. These medications include metformin, Symlin, and Victoza. Many of these medications are made for treating Type 2 diabetes, but can be prescribed for those with Type 1. These medications may cause nausea, diarrhea, delayed stomach emptying, bloating and decreased appetite. For many who choose to use the medications, the GI symptoms may go away with continued use. For others, the symp Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Digestive System Diseases

Diabetes And Digestive System Diseases

Diabetes Diabetes affects digestive system in many ways and has mutual effect with diabetic digestive system disease, which must be treated at the same time. Diabetics always have symptoms like weakened peristalsis and prolonged emptying time in their esophagus, intestines and stomach, even gastroparesis, which can cause nausea, after-meal epigastric pain, and vomiting. Due to absorption malfunction, diabetics’ blood glucose level is always hard to control, causing repeated outbreak of both hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Many diabetics complain they have irregular bowl movement, mostly constipation, sometimes diarrhea or both, leaving them many troubles and no solutions. Pancreas can also be affected, as diabetics are more likely to catch pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer than ordinary people, while both acute and chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer can induce diabetes. The same goes to the mutual effect between diabetes and hepatobiliary system. Treating digestive system disease has the same principles as treating other diabetic chronic complications, which also includes condition control of diabetes, treatment of diabetic neurovascular disease and operative treatments when necessary. What’s worth noting is that digestive system disease could affect diabetics’ digestive and absorptive functions, causing malnutrition, thus extra supplement of vitamins and other nutritional composition is necessary. See also: What is diabetic neuropathy? How to prevent diabetic neuropathy? How to Prevent Diabetic Skin DiseaseHow to Prevent Diabetic Kidney DiseaseDiabetic Heart DiseaseDiabetes and Cerebral Vascular DiseaseDiabetes and Fatty liver Neglect of Diabetes May Induce Terrible ComplicationsOral Care of Diabetes Patients Copyright Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System

How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System

Diabetic Neuropathy - The Damage caused to your nerve due to Diabetes. Watch this video to clearly understand what it means, what are its types and details about Autonomic Neuropathy. ... Developed and produced by Animation Description: This patient-friendly animation describes the main role of insulin in the human body. When food is ingested,... Istokephoto) kidneys, nerves, and other body partsand double the risk of if diet exercise alone won't do it, there are drugs that boost muscle's diabetes can a serious damage to your functions... Pancreas functions and possible problems medical news today. That a gland producing chemistry intimately linked to the digestion of food and drink is diabetes how insulin glucagon regulate... Digestive Enzymes and Probiotics: Diabetic People With Digestive Problems Needs 3-In-1 Digestive Formula Do you know that digestive problems are relatively common... Visit to "Learn a Little-Known, But 100% Scientifically-Proven Way To ERASE Your Diabetes in 3 SHORT weeks... " The effects of diabetes on the body can be awful. They... The effects of sugar can take your body down a vicious cycle known as metabolic syndrome. UC Davis' Kimber Stanhope altered the diets of a group of volunteers for her study. Instead of her... Heart and circulatory system blood sugar your circulatory, system, the highway of life diabetes. Malnutrition and type 2 diabetes on the circulatory system. Googleusercontent search. Diabetes... This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here Voice... Probiotics & Digestive Enzymes: 3-in-1 Digestive Formula Helps Diabetic Individuals With Digestive Issues Do you understand that digestion issues are fairly common among individuals with diabetes?... View full lesson: Beneath your ribs, you'll Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

On this page: Every day, two more Australian children and as many as six Australians of all ages develop type 1 diabetes, which makes it one of the most common serious diseases among children. Diabetes is a condition of the endocrine system (the system of glands that delivers hormones). To use glucose (blood sugar) for energy, the hormone insulin needs to be secreted by the pancreas, a gland located in the abdomen. A person with type 1 diabetes is unable to produce insulin. Treatment involves closely monitoring blood sugar levels, modifying diet and taking daily injections of insulin. Type 1 diabetes can affect anyone, but is more common in people under 30 years and tends to begin in childhood. Other names for type 1 diabetes have included juvenile diabetes and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Approximately one in every ten Australians with diabetes has type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is much more common in Australia than in other countries. The pancreas and type 1 diabetes The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates into glucose. This simple sugar is then transported to each cell via the bloodstream. The pancreas secretes the hormone insulin, which allows the glucose to migrate from the blood into the cells. Once inside a cell, the glucose is ‘burned’, along with oxygen, to produce energy. The pancreas of a person with type 1 diabetes doesn’t make enough insulin to keep blood glucose normal. Without insulin, the glucose remains in the bloodstream at high levels. The body recognises the problem and tries to provide the cells with other sources of fuel, such as stored fats. Extensive fat burning can release by-products called ketones, which are dangerous in high amounts. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes The symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: excessive t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gastrointestinal Issues

Diabetes And Gastrointestinal Issues

Gastrointestinal disorders occur more often in those with diabetes. In fact, at some point in their life, those with diabetes will develop a GI problem such as ulcers, gallstones, IBS or another GI disorder. Upwards of 75% of diabetes patients report to their doctors experiencing GI symptoms. Overlooked or Misdiagnosed While many experience these symptoms the diagnosis is not always the same and oftentimes is misdiagnosed initially. The entire gastrointestinal tract can be damaged and affected by diabetes starting at the mouth to the esophagus all the way through to the anorectal area. Because of the complex nature of GI symptoms and the area of the gastrointestinal tract that they cover, this leads to issues in diagnosing and treating GI conditions in diabetes patients. I advise reading the following articles: Previously GI conditions were not associated with diabetes. This also lead to misdiagnosis, overlooked conditions or even improper treatments. New research has begun to suggest otherwise, which is leading to an increase in GI issues and conditions in diabetes patients. Blood Sugar Control and its Correlation to Gastrointestinal Conditions Acute and chronic periods of high blood sugar can lead to GI complications. And as with other diabetes complications, poor blood sugar control is usually associated with more severe GI issues. Those with retinopathy and neuropathy should be tested to check for GI conditions. Dysfunction in how the neurons supply the enteric nervous system in the body can lead to GI complications. Similar to how nerves in the feet lead to neuropathy, the body’s intestinal nerves can also lead to enteric neuropathy. This type of neuropathy is known as autonomic neuropathy which can lead to an abnormality in how the body secretes and absorbs nutr Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: Causes And Effects

Gastroparesis: Causes And Effects

A number of times throughout this book, you’ve come across the terms “delayed stomach-emptying” and “gastroparesis.” As I explained in Chapter 2, elevated blood sugars for prolonged periods can impair the ability of nerves to function properly. It’s very common that the nerves that stimulate the muscular activity, enzyme secretion, and acid production essential to digestion function poorly in long-standing diabetes. These changes affect the stomach, the gut, or both. Dr. Richard McCullum, a noted authority on digestion, has said that if a diabetic has any other form of neuropathy (dry feet, reduced feeling in the toes, diminished reflexes, et cetera), he or she will also experience delayed or erratic digestion. Slowed digestion can be fraught with unpleasant symptoms (rarely), or it may only be detectable when we review blood sugar profiles (commonly) or perform certain diagnostic tests. The picture is different for each of us. For more than twenty-five years, I suffered from many unpleasant symptoms myself. I eventually saw them taper off and vanish after thirteen years of essentially normal blood sugars. Some of the physical complaints possible (usually after meals) include burning along the midline of the chest (“heartburn”), belching, feeling full after a small meal (early satiety), bloating, nausea, vomiting, constipation, constipation alternating with diarrhea, cramps a few inches above the belly button, and an acid taste in the mouth. GASTROPARESIS: CAUSES AND EFFECTS Most of these symptoms, as well as effects upon blood sugar, relate to delayed stomach-emptying. This condition is called gastroparesis diabeticorum, which translates from the Latin as “weak stomach of diabetics.” It is believed that the major cause of this condition is neuropath Continue reading >>

How Can Autoimmune Diseases Affect The Digestive System?

How Can Autoimmune Diseases Affect The Digestive System?

Although autoimmune diseases (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, lupus, multiple sclerosis) are not technically "digestive disorders", we must mention them because not only are they prevalent among millions of women today, but they are conditions that can indeed cramp a digestive style. Anyone who suffers from an autoimmune disorder has a system that, for whatever reason, is attacking itself. Such a hostile environment does not bode well for the digestive tract that aims to achieve nutrient and energy balance. It's common for people with an autoimmune disease to simultaneously suffer from food intolerances and digestive disorders that require unique attention to diet. Continue reading >>

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