diabetestalk.net

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Oral Health?

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Oral Health?

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. Unless it is well-managed, diabetes can cause blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and other health problems including gum disease and tooth loss. And oral health issues can also raise your risk of developing diabetes, and make it more difficult to control the disease. November is American Diabetes Month, a time to raise awareness about diabetes and encourage people to make healthy changes that can lower their risk of diabetes or help them better control the disease. Positive lifestyle changes include eating well, exercising regularly, and good oral health care. Diabetes and Your Teeth People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing oral health problems, such as gingivitis (early stage gum disease) and periodontitis (serious gum disease). This is because diabetes can cause blood vessels to thicken, reducing their ability to remove waste products and deliver nourishment and oxygen to body tissues, including the gums. The good news is that if your blood glucose levels are well- controlled, your risk of serious oral health complications is similar to those of people without diabetes. And good oral health can also help you manage your diabetes. Serious gum disease may make it more difficult to manage blood glucose levels and can speed the progression of diabetes. It’s important for you to maintain your oral health with careful at-home hygiene routine and regular dental checkups and cleanings. And, according to the American Diabetes Association, research has also suggested that having gum disease may result in a higher chance of developing diabetes. That’s because serious gum disease may have the ability to affect glucose levels in the blood. Avoiding Diabetic Dental Problems Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases that lead to high levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia), which is caused when the body does not make any or enough insulin, or does not use insulin well. Because diabetes is a relatively common condition, practicing dentists are likely to encounter it frequently. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the beta cells in the pancreas create little to no insulin, and accounts for 5% to 10% of all diabetes cases. In contrast, Type 2 diabetes accounts for 85% to 90% or more of diabetes cases and is one of the commonest chronic diseases, characterized by decreased response of target tissues to insulin, dysregulation of insulin production, or a combination of both. As with any patient, the dentist should review the patients medical history, take vital signs, and evaluate for oral signs and symptoms of inadequately controlled diabetes, which may be common. Oral manifestations of uncontrolled diabetes can include: xerostomia; burning sensation in the mouth; impaired/delayed wound healing; increased incidence and severity of infections; secondary infection with candidiasis; parotid salivary gland enlargement; gingivitis; and/or periodontitis. Although patients with diabetes usually recognize signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia and self-intervene before changes in or loss of consciousness occurs, staff should be trained to recognize the signs and treat patients who have hypoglycemia. In such cases, a glucometer should be used to test patient blood glucose levels, and every dental office should have a protocol for managing hypoglycemia in both conscious and unconscious patients. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases that leads to high levels of blood glucose and is caused when the body does not make Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes and Oral Health November is American Diabetes Month. Did you know that diabetes can increase your risk of dental disease and other symptoms that show up in your mouth? One in five cases of total tooth loss is linked to diabetes, according to the Journal of the American Dental Association. How does diabetes affect your oral health? Gum disease affects 22 percent of diabetics. According to MouthHealthy, patient website for the American Dental Association, people with diabetes are at a higher risk for gum problems because of poor blood sugar control. Have you ever noticed a cold sore or a cut in your mouth that doesn’t quite seem to go away? Poor control of blood sugar can keep injuries from healing quickly and properly. Studies show that some people with diabetes have less saliva, so you might find yourself feeling parched or extra thirsty. Fight dry mouth by drinking water. You can also chew sugarless gum and eat healthy, crunchy foods to get saliva flowing. This is especially important because extra sugar in your saliva, combined with less saliva to wash away leftover food, can lead to cavities. Diabetes also affects your immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to infection. One common issue among people with diabetes is a yeast infection called oral thrush. The yeast thrive on the higher amount of sugar found in your saliva, and it looks like a white layer coating your tongue and the insides of your cheeks. Thrush is more common in people who wear dentures and can often leave a bad taste in your mouth. The good news is you can take charge of your health today. Controlling your blood sugar, brushing, flossing and visiting your dentist regularly can go a long way to help decrease the likelihood of developing these diabetes-related mouth issues. For more inf Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

People with diabetes have a higher risk of tooth and gum problems. It is important to look after your oral health and control your blood glucose levels to prevent gum disease. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Quit smoking. On this page: People with diabetes who have irregular blood glucose levels have a higher risk of tooth problems and gum disease than people without diabetes. This is because they have lowered resistance to infection and may not heal as easily. If you are living with diabetes, you need to pay particular attention to your oral health and dental care, as well as controlling your blood glucose levels. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Diabetes is a common disease among Australians, affecting almost 1.5 million people (around 7.6 per cent of the population). The first signs and symptoms of diabetes can occur in the mouth, so paying attention to your oral health can also lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. The most common oral health problems affecting people with diabetes are: periodontal (gum) disease gum abscesses tooth decay fungal infections such as thrush lichen planus (an inflammatory, autoimmune skin condition) mouth ulcers taste disturbances a dry, burning mouth (low saliva levels). Diabetes and periodontal (gum) disease Periodontal (gum) disease is caused by an infection that destroys the bone surrounding and supporting your teeth. This bone holds your teeth into your jawbone and allows you to chew comfortably. Bacteria and food debris called dental plaque is essential for gum disease. If left on teeth and gums, plaque hardens to form calculus or tartar. The plaque and calculus irritate the gums around teeth so they become red, swollen a Continue reading >>

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that can affect the whole body — your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart, and other important systems in the body. It can also affect your mouth. People with diabetes face a higher than normal risk of oral health problems. Why are people with diabetes more likely to develop oral health problems? The link between diabetes and oral health problems is high blood sugar. If blood sugar is poorly controlled, oral health problems are more likely to develop. This is because uncontrolled diabetes weakens white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against bacterial infections that can occur in the mouth. Just as studies have shown that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of major organ complications of diabetes — such as eye, heart, and nerve damage — so to can diabetes control protect against the development of oral health problems. Specifically, what are some of these oral health problems? Dry mouth: Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease saliva flow, resulting in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay. Gum inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontitis: Besides weakening white blood cells, another complication of diabetes is that it causes blood vessels to thicken. This slows the flow of nutrients to and waste products from body tissues, including the mouth. When this combination of events, the body loses its ability to fight infections. Since periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, people with uncontrolled diabetes might experience more frequent and more severe gum disease. Poor healing of oral tissues: People with uncontrolled diabetes do not heal quickly after oral surgery or other dental procedures because blood flow to the treatment site can be damaged. Thrush: People with diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Resize font A- A A+ Diabetes and Oral Health During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes–14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial Continue reading >>

How To Keep Your Mouth Healthy

How To Keep Your Mouth Healthy

If you have diabetes, you’re more likely to have oral health problems like cavities and gum disease. If you have diabetes and you're over 50, your risk is even higher. That's because dental problems and age go hand in hand, whether or not you have diabetes. The good news is that controlling your diabetes will go a long way toward protecting your teeth and gums. And that, in turn, will also help you manage your diabetes. If you have diabetes, keep an eye out for these oral health conditions -- especially if you've already reached the half-century mark. Gingivitis Gum disease is the most common oral health problem among people with diabetes. The first stage of gum disease is called gingivitis. This is when bacteria cause your gums to bleed, turn red, and feel sore. Bacteria love to feast on sugar, turning it into tooth-damaging acid. Uncontrolled diabetes means more sugar in your saliva, and that means a free banquet for bacteria. As bacteria gather, they combine with saliva and pieces of leftover food to form plaque. When it builds up, it leads to tooth decay and gum disease. Regular brushing and flossing, as well as rinsing with antiseptic mouthwash will get rid of it and stop gingivitis in its tracks. Periodontitis If left untreated, gingivitis can turn into periodontitis, a more serious type of gum disease that erodes the bone and tissues that support your teeth. In the worst case, you might lose your teeth. If you don’t floss and brush regularly, bacteria and plaque can build up on your teeth. That causes your gums to pull away from them. It creates pockets where bacteria dig in and wage war on more and more parts of your mouth, including bones. Periodontitis can't be reversed and can't be treated with brushing and flossing alone. Your dentist will have to get in Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Did you know that trouble keeping your blood sugars in control could lead to an infection? That infection could be in your gums. That’s right. People with diabetes have a higher incidence of gum disease or periodontal disease than people without diabetes. In this article, we will look at the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. We will look at what it is, what are the prevention and treatment options available, some other oral problems that are also linked to diabetes, and more. Just like high blood glucose makes it easier for you to get an infection in other places in your body, high blood glucose levels also make it easier to get a gum infection, or other infection in your mouth. Decaying teeth and poor oral habits contribute to periodontal disease, as does smoking. We will take a look at all of that here. First, let’s see why Martin contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Martin was interested in learning more about his high blood sugars and their effects on his teeth. He had been trying to get his blood sugar levels down, but nothing he seemed to do with diet, exercise, or medications helped in aiming his target range for blood sugars or in an A1C range that he was comfortable with. He was due to pay a visit to his dentist since his last visit was over a year ago. Martin’s dentist told him that he was at the start of a periodontal disease, and in addition, he had a gum infection. He wondered if the infection in his gums may be a reason for why he was unable to keep his blood glucose in a good range. An infection anywhere in your body could be a reason for unruly blood glucose. Let’s see if we can answer Martin’s question in depth. What is periodontal disease? Periodontal disease is an infection that develops of the gum, and underlying bone, that holds the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health Problems

Diabetes And Oral Health Problems

Is There an Association Between Gum Disease and Diabetes? For the nearly 21 million Americans that have diabetes, many may be surprised to learn about an unexpected complication associated with this condition. Research shows that there is an increased prevalence of gum disease among those with diabetes, adding serious gum disease to the list of other complications associated with diabetes, such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. Is There a Two-Way Street? Emerging research also suggests that the relationship between serious gum disease and diabetes is two-way. Not only are people with diabetes more susceptible to serious gum disease, but serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. Research suggests that people with diabetes are at higher risk for oral health problems, such as gingivitis (an early stage of gum disease) and periodontitis (serious gum disease). People with diabetes are at an increased risk for serious gum disease because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection, and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums. The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health states that good oral health is integral to general health. So be sure to brush and floss properly and see your dentist for regular checkups. If I Have Diabetes, am I at Risk for Dental Problems? If your blood glucose levels are poorly controlled, you are more likely to develop serious gum disease and lose more teeth than non-diabetics. Like all infections, serious gum disease may be a factor in causing blood sugar to rise and may make diabetes harder to control. Other oral problems associated to diabetes include: thrush, an infection caused by fungus that grows in the mouth, and dry Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health?

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health?

It is estimated that up to 20 million people have diabetes, but only two-thirds of these individuals are diagnosed. Studies have shown that diabetics are more susceptible to the development of oral infections and periodontal (gum) disease than those who do not have diabetes. Oral infections tend to be more severe in diabetic patients than non-diabetic patients. And, diabetics who do not have good control over their blood sugar levels tend to have more oral health problems. These infections occur more often after puberty and in aging patients. How are gum disease and diabetes related? Because diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection, the gums are at risk for gingivitis, an inflammation usually caused by the presence of bacteria in plaque. Plaque is the sticky film that accumulates on teeth both above and below the gum line. Without regular dental check-ups, gum disease may result if gingivitis is left untreated. It also can cause inflammation and destruction of tissues surrounding and supporting teeth, gums, bone and fibers that hold the gums to the teeth. What other types of problems could I experience? Diabetics may experience burning mouth syndrome and fungal infections, such as thrush and oral candidiasis. Dry mouth (xerostomia) also may develop, causing an increased incidence of decay. To prevent problems with bacterial infections in the mouth, your dentist may prescribe antibiotics, medicated mouth rinses and more frequent cleanings. How can I stay healthy? Make sure to take extra good care of your mouth and have dental infections treated immediately. Diabetics who receive good dental care and have good insulin control typically have a better chance at avoiding gum disease. Diet and exercise may be the most important changes that diabetics can make to im Continue reading >>

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Diabetes affects almost 26 million Americans, which is more than 8 percent of the U.S. population. The condition often requires them to make lifestyle changes, including what they eat, how they exercise and the medications they take. It also requires them to change the way they take care of their teeth and gums. About one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal disease which is causing the gum tissue and bone around the teeth to break down, according to the National Institutes of Health. People with poorly-controlled diabetes had a 2.9 times increased risk of developing periodontitis than non-diabetics, according to a large study published in 2002. The same study found people with well-controlled diabetes had no significant increase in the risk of periodontitis. There are several reasons why poorly-controlled diabetes can increase your chance of getting periodontal disease, said Dr. Dale Nash, a dentist at Coast Dental Wesley Chapel. In the past decade, Dr. Nash has seen an increase in the number of patients with diabetes. "People with diabetes are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection," Dr. Nash said. "Diabetics have high blood sugar, which basically coats the immune-fighting cells and affects the blood supply to many areas of the body including the patient’s mouth." Here’s how it works: The poor circulation affects the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the gums, called the gingiva, and the cells in your mouth that help fight off infection. If the gums can’t get the nutrients they need, then it’s harder to fight infection. Also, poor circulation means the blood can’t carry away bad bacteria effectively. Research shows the functions of immune cells in poorly-controlled diabetics are altered in other ways.(1) One kind o Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health?

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health?

By: Dr. Katherine Schrubbe Over 29 million Americans have diabetes...that’s over 9% of our population. These millions of people find ways to live with their symptoms and complications every day, including an increased risk of oral health issues. November is American Diabetes Month, but at Dental Associates we focus extra attention on our patients with diabetes throughout the entire year. Therefore, we’d like to take this opportunity to help you understand how diabetes affects your oral health, and also let you know how Dental Associates’ dentists help those with diabetes to effectively manage the disease. What is Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. Those with type 2 diabetes have insulin resistance, in which their bodies do not use insulin properly. Though their bodies try to produce extra insulin to make up for the deficiency, over time they are not able to keep up and cannot regulate their insulin levels. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Diabetes affects your mouth in a few ways: Diabetes weakens the gums. If there’s too much glucose in a person’s system, blood vessels can’t function properly. Since your mouth has millions of bacteria in it, those with diabetes can’t properly fight the bacteria, thus the gums will weaken and develop disease faster. Diabetes can lead to periodontal disease. Because blood vessels are impaired, the flow of nutrients and removal of body wastes are impaired and this will weaken the gums and bone making them more susceptible to infection; those with di Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health

According to the latest report by the World Health Organization, 422 million people around the world have diabetes. It remains to be one of the leading causes of death in the world. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you may know that the disease comes with alarming complications such as stroke, heart disease and kidney failure. It is also an important cause of blindness and amputation. Did you know that diabetics are also at special risk for periodontal or gum disease? 422 million people around the world have diabetes. It remains to be one of the leading causes of death in the world. How are diabetes and gum disease related? Diabetes reduces the bodys resistance to infection and slows down healing process. This is why oral infections tend to be more severe in people with diabetes. Moreover, people with uncontrolled diabetes tend to have more oral health problems. This is because uncontrolled diabetes impairs leukocytes (white blood cells), the bodys primary defense against infections. Diabetes also decreases salivary flow and increase salivary glucose levels the perfect setting for fungal infections such as thrush. What other types of problems could diabetics experience? Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) - a painful and often frustrating condition that may affect the tongue, the roof of the mouth, the gums, the inside of the, cheeks and the back of the mouth or throat. Also called burning tongue (or lips) syndrome, scalded mouth syndrome, it is often described as a burning sensation in the tongue, lips, palate or throughout the mouth. Dry mouth (xerostamia) Diabetes can reduce saliva flow which results in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, ulcers, infections and tooth decay. Thrush - an infection caused by fungus that grows in the mouth. Thrush produ Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes affects your body’s ability to utilize glucose, or blood sugar, for energy. Diabetes can cause many complications. These include nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and even blindness. Another common health complication is gum disease and other oral health problems. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at higher risk for gingivitis, gum disease, and periodontitis (severe gum infection with bone destruction). Diabetes affects your ability to fight off bacteria that can cause gum infections. Gum disease can also affect the body’s blood sugar control. Diabetes is associated with increased risk for thrush, a type of fungal infection. Additionally, people with diabetes are likely to have a dry mouth. This has been associated with increased risk for mouth ulcers, soreness, cavities, and dental infections. What the research says A 2013 study published in the journal BMC Oral Health looked at 125 people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers measured factors including missing teeth, the incidence of periodontal disease, and the amount of reported dental bleeding. The study found that a combination of the longer people had diabetes, the higher their fasting blood glucose, and the higher their hemoglobin A1C (a measurement of a person’s average blood sugar over three months), the more likely they were to have periodontal disease and dental bleeding. Those who did not report careful self-management of their condition were more likely to have missing teeth than those who did work to control their blood sugar levels. Some people with diabetes are at greater risk for oral health problems than others. For example, people who don’t maintain tight control over their blood sugar levels are more likely to get gum disease. Al Continue reading >>

More in diabetes