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How Does An Endocrinologist Help People With Diabetes?

What Does Endocrinologist Treat

What Does Endocrinologist Treat

. Endocrinologists treat people who suffer from hormonal imbalances, typically from glands in the endocrine system or certain types of cancers. Sep 12, 2016 Endocrinologists help patients with conditions like hormonal imbalances, diabetes, and more. Mar 12, 2010 If she doesn't have one or the OB/GYN doctor just wants to put her on birth control pills and doesn't want to do any testing on why she is not having a period, I think it's worthwhile seeing an endocrinologist. In these cases, an endocrinologist is necessary to ensure all possible treatment avenues are pursued. Nov 24, 2017 A diabetologist is a physician who only treats patients with diabetes. A hormone A gland does not produce enough of its hormones. Endocrinology is the field of hormone-related diseases. An endocrinologist is a doctor who specializes in treating diabetes and other diseases of the "endocrine system" — the body's system of glands that produce hormones Many people think that the best doctor to treat every thyroid condition is an endocrinologist. An endocrinologist can diagnose and treat hormone problems and the complications that arise from them We offer pain free anti-aging treatment for patients in New Jersey and the surrounding areas. Find doctors with specialty from WebMD Physician Directory Obstetrics and Gynecology Explore obstetric and gynecologic care at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota There is controversy over whether to treat patients with mild hypothyroidism. The overall goal of treatment is to restore the normal balance of hormones found in a patient's Oct 12, 2017 An endocrinologist specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of conditions related to hormone imbalances and problems. Only you know how you feel and what you're willing and able to do. The major endocrine glands a Continue reading >>

Why This Endocrinologist Hates Diabetes

Why This Endocrinologist Hates Diabetes

[HD: The following post started out titled “Ketogenic Diet – Diabetes Cure?” I initially intended to write a post primarily about the effects of a ketogenic diet on diabetes. But, my preamble about why I don’t like treating diabetes turned out to be way too long (shocker, right?), so I present it to you now as a standalone post. That means you’ll have to wait a little longer for the ketogenic diet article, which I think will be engaging for anyone with an interest in this field, even if you don’t plan to adopt that eating strategy. At the end of the post today, I’ve included a sneak peek at Part 2. Must have been feeling generous today…] I’m going to share a secret with you: I do not enjoy treating diabetes. In fact, I downright dislike it, and I’ve grown my practice in other areas of Endocrinology to the point where diabetes comprises only a small part of my practice. Before you jump all over me about how diabetics are people too, let me make it clear that I don’t dislike my patients with diabetes. In fact, some of my favorite patients are diabetics I’ve been treating for years. After years of these folks dealing with the disease, I don’t always have new advice to offer at an office visit, so we’ll often spend half the time shooting the breeze about our lives. I find that thoroughly enjoyable. So why do I prefer to avoid treating diabetes? I’ll get to the more substantive reasons in a moment, but first we need to talk about the logistical aspects of managing diabetes that make it difficult. Even if diabetics comprise only 20% of one’s practice, they will consume 80% of the practice’s resources. Again, I’m not blaming the people with diabetes, but it is what it is. Take a look at just a slice of what goes into managing diabetes: We (p Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Most people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you have type 2, you might have one or both of the following problems: Your cells don’t use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. Your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin. This is called insulin deficiency. Often when type 2 diabetes is first diagnosed, the problem is insulin resistance. But as the disease progresses, the pancreas may also produce less insulin. Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 usually comes on gradually. Type 2 diabetes is treated with a combination of diet, exercise, and oral medications (pills). In some cases, injections of insulin or other medications are needed to help control blood glucose levels. Uncontrolled diabetes can result in catastrophic health problems including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nervous system disease, amputations, dental disease, and pregnancy complications. In people with diabetes, high blood glucose can cause two problems — both of which can result in foot problems. You may have one or both of these: Nerve damage (neuropathy). Nerve damage from high blood glucose usually begins in the hands and feet. It can cause painful symptoms — tingling, aching, or throbbing — but it can also reduce sensation. If you can’t really feel cold, heat, or pain in your feet, it’s easy to ignore an injury or infection. And unfortunately, in people with diabetes, even a small blister or stubbed toe can become serious. Poor circulation. High blood glucose can damage your blood vessels and reduce blood flow to your feet. This means that injuries take longer to heal. Over time, poor circulation in your feet can even change the shape of your feet and toes. This can cause problems with the way you walk. Sometimes — but not always — symptoms are t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

5 Questions With A Diabetes Physician Who Has Type 1

5 Questions With A Diabetes Physician Who Has Type 1

Because of his type 1 diabetes diagnosis at 5 years old, endocrinologist Scott Soleimanpour devoted his career to those with the condition. A childhood diagnosis led to a life’s work for one U-M physician. “I remember being 5 years old at a family wedding and becoming super thirsty,” says Scott Soleimanpour, M.D., assistant professor of endocrinology at the University of Michigan Health System. “I mean, imagine the worst thirst you could ever have. Like you’re out in the desert, and then multiply that times 10.” Soleimanpour didn’t know what his thirst meant at the time. But that day would significantly alter his life forever. His parents realized something was incredibly wrong, and Soleimanpour’s father, a physician, sought medical treatment for his son. After a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, Soleimanpour spent two weeks in an intensive care unit as a medical team worked to get his sugars under control and to place him on insulin treatments. “They told me I have a lazy pancreas, and it isn’t making enough insulin,” Soleimanpour says. “It was a life-changing event that put me on the path to working with diabetes. I wanted to help people also suffering with this condition.” We sat down with Soleimanpour to learn more about being a diabetes researcher and physician affected by the disease, and how he uses his personal experiences to help others with diabetes. Soleimanpour: At the young age of my diagnosis, I saw dynamic teams of endocrine doctors, educators, nurses, etc. It also helped that my parents were always interested in the latest scientific advances. I decided to go medical school and wanted to be a pediatric diabetes doctor. I had an advisor at the time that presented me with a research opportunity and said, “Do you want to look for a c Continue reading >>

Experts Recommend Two-pronged Approach To Treating Prediabetes

Experts Recommend Two-pronged Approach To Treating Prediabetes

According to the most recent data compiled by the CDC, 57 million U.S. adults have prediabetes, a figure that has reached pandemic levels. “In an ideal world, you want to diagnose high-risk people early in order to prevent progression to full-blown diabetes and its associated complications,” Glenn Matfin, MD, clinical associate professor at New York University and senior staff physician at the Joslin Diabetes Center, told Endocrine Today. Whether prediabetes progresses to diabetes depends on a number of variable factors, including lifestyle changes, genetics and treatment practices, which have some physicians supporting the use of medication and others vehemently against it. “We draw lines in order to differentiate between normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes and diabetes, but it is an interlinked, continuous chain,” Matfin said. “The clock is ticking, and the health risks rise significantly as prediabetes goes untreated.” To examine the current state of prediabetes treatment, Endocrine Today spoke with a number of experts to best understand how lifestyle and pharmacological approaches should be utilized to reverse glucose functions to normal levels. The issue is also examined from a financial aspect, as the ability to keep patients with prediabetes from turning into patients with diabetes translates into hundreds of millions of dollars saved in health care costs. Ralph DeFronzo, MD, and diabetes experts discuss preferred therapeutic approaches for people with prediabetes. Perhaps due to its subtle set of symptoms, the identification and diagnosis of patients with prediabetes has proved to be a challenge. Research has shown that although 30% of the U.S. population had prediabetes in 2005 to 2006, only 7.3% were aware that they had it. A consensus from diabe Continue reading >>

Why Family Doctors Refer Patients To An Endocrinologist

Why Family Doctors Refer Patients To An Endocrinologist

Many Diabetics, Thyroid Patients and Others with Endocrine-Based Diseases and Conditions Don’t Really Know Their Disease or Treatment Options It is surprising in today’s world of advanced medicine that so many patients with diabetes, thyroid disease and other endocrine disorders don’t understand their disease or their treatment. While a family physician or OB/GYN is knowledgeable and capable of managing these conditions, patients can better benefit from more specialized attention beyond that offered from a comprehensive, routine exam. Many of these conditions are life long and require a more focused approach that incorporates the ever-changing world of medicine and treatment options. Thus, while primary care providers are highly trained in all areas of medicine, many refer patients to endocrinologists. Many disorders associated with the endocrine system involve other systems in your body. In addition to diabetes and thyroid problems, endocrinologists are specially trained to diagnose and treat conditions such as metabolic disorders, hypertension, osteoporosis and the over or underproduction of hormones. Having a more in-depth knowledge of the pathophysiology and treatment modalities, endocrinologists can optimize patient outcomes, as they are well versed in the most recent clinical data and medication options. A treatment schedule and regular follow-ups are necessary to efficiently monitor blood work, physical changes, the effects of the medications and evaluate the risks for potential adverse side effects. Additionally, an endocrinologist is able to offer lifestyle recommendations which result in a more balanced and enhanced quality of life. By seeing an endocrinologist, patients may avoid spending thousands of dollars in doctor visits and hospitalizations. There Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To See An Endocrinologist If You Have Diabetes

5 Reasons To See An Endocrinologist If You Have Diabetes

Last fall I didn’t want to go to my endocrinologist because I was worried about the possible results of my latest A1C test. Seemingly 5 pounds heavier than my last visit, I had no interest in being weighed. Although I fully know how important it is to take your blood sugar regularly when you have diabetes, I hadn’t been doing so, and when I did test it, I didn’t like what I saw. There were mornings when I woke to a spike in my glucose or late afternoons when, after skipping lunch, it dropped too low. If only I had exercised more. Or eaten fewer carbs. Or not stressed out about every little thing. I was ashamed that I hadn’t worked harder. How had I fallen so off track? What would my doctor think of me? The Benefits of Seeing an Endocrinologist for Diabetes Of course, endocrinologists who specialize in diabetes care aren’t there to judge patients. Their job is to go over your blood tests, particularly your hemoglobin A1C readings, which tell you the two- to three-month average of your blood sugar level. They’re there to check your feet, to make sure your circulation is healthy; to take your blood pressure; to respond to any problems you may have encountered since the last visit; and to fine-tune your diabetes care. Despite this knowledge, when it comes to my hesitation to visit my doctor, I have a feeling I’m not alone. But no matter about these worries, Eileen Sturner, manager of diabetes and outpatient nutrition at Abington Jefferson Health in Pennsylvania, has one message for her diabetes patients: Keep the appointment. “Whether it's the dietitian, the primary-care physician, or the endocrinologist, we’re all here to help patients achieve good care,” Sturner says. “So even if from the patient’s perspective they are not achieving what they want Continue reading >>

Endocrinologist – Why See One?

Endocrinologist – Why See One?

There is more to treating diabetes than keeping your blood sugar levels healthy. Most people with diabetes have a health care team to help them manage. Discover why you may need to see an endocrinologist when you have diabetes. People with diabetes typically work with a health care team including a primary care physician, dentist, ophthalmologist, podiatrist, a diabetes nurse educator, fitness trainer and dietitian. Another person who may be part of your health care team is an endocrinologist. An endocrinologist has extra specialized training to diagnose and treat illnesses that affect your endocrine system, hormones and glands. Insulin is a central hormone the body needs to function and your pancreas is part of the endocrine system. Typically an endocrinologist treats people with diabetes, metabolic disorders, growth disorders, thyroid disease and other related conditions. Often your primary care physician will refer you to an endocrinologist if a specialist is required to help assist with your diabetes self-management program. Most people with type 1 diabetes are advised to see an endocrinologist especially when the condition is new and they are still learning. It may be difficult for the primary care physician to prescribe an insulin regime. People with type 2 diabetes may also be referred when they develop complications or have difficulty managing their condition. An endocrinologist can help you manage your diabetes in the best way possible. In certain situations, a general physician might not be completely comfortable caring for diabetes or could lack the resources to educate a patient. Endocrinologists provide patients with essential information about taking care of diabetes. This helps the patient to be well-trained and motivated to participate fully in their own Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors

Diabetes Doctors

A number of different healthcare professionals treat diabetes. A good first step is to talk to your primary care doctor about testing if you’re at risk for diabetes or if you begin experiencing symptoms associated with the disease. While you may work with your primary care doctor to manage your diabetes, it’s also possible to rely on another doctor or specialist to monitor your condition. Read on to learn about the different doctors and specialists who can assist in various aspects of diabetes diagnosis and care. Primary care physician Your primary care doctor can monitor you for diabetes at your regular checkups. Your doctor may perform blood tests to check for the disease, depending on your symptoms or risk factors. If you do have diabetes, your doctor may prescribe medication and manage your condition. They may also refer you to a specialist to help monitor your treatment. It’s likely that your primary care doctor will be part of a team of healthcare professionals who will work with you. Endocrinologist Diabetes is a disease of the pancreas gland, which is part of the endocrine system. An endocrinologist is a specialist who diagnoses, treats, and manages pancreatic diseases. People with type 1 diabetes are often under the care of an endocrinologist to help them manage their treatment plan. Sometimes, people with type 2 diabetes may also need an endocrinologist if they have trouble getting their blood glucose levels under control. Eye doctor Many people with diabetes experience complications with their eyes over time. These might include: You must regularly visit an eye doctor, such an optometrist or ophthalmologist, to check for these potentially serious conditions. According to guidelines from the American Diabetes Association, people with type 1 diabetes shou Continue reading >>

Should Everyone With Diabetes See An Endocrinologist?

Should Everyone With Diabetes See An Endocrinologist?

I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes by my primary-care doctor. Do I need to see a specialist? In general, if you have uncomplicated type 2 diabetes, your primary-care doctor can manage your diabetes care. But I do recommend, especially for new-onset diabetes, that you ask your primary-care doctor to refer you to one particular kind of specialist—a certified diabetes educator (CDE). Among other things, a CDE is specially trained to be able to advise you on lifestyle changes, such as proper nutrition and how much and what kinds of physical activity will help you manage your blood sugar and avoid diabetic complications. Having a CDE assist you with these and other time-consuming elements of treatment relieves some of the burden of care from your doctor, who is not likely to have as much time available during a regular office visit. That’s why a CDE needs to be a key part of your health-care team. Type 1 diabetes is a different story. Anyone who has type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder, should have an endocrinologist on his/her health-care team. An endocrinologist is able to oversee the tightly structured treatment program necessary to manage type 1 diabetes and deal with such things as high-tech insulin pumps, continuous glucose-monitoring devices and so forth. Some people with type 2 diabetes also should see an endocrinologist. See one if… • You’re having trouble controlling your blood sugar. • You and your primary-care doctor are finding it difficult to find the right mix of medications to control your blood sugar without worrisome side effects, including low blood sugar. • You need to take three or more insulin injections per day or use an insulin pump. Even if your type 2 diabetes doesn’t include the above challenges, it makes sense to cons Continue reading >>

Endocrinology Frequently Asked Questions

Endocrinology Frequently Asked Questions

In this section are answers to questions about endocrine-related diseases. There are separate sections for diabetes, weight management, pituitary problems and bone problems. Questions about Diabetes Questions about Pituitary Problems Questions about Bones What is hemoglobin A1c? This is a type of blood test. A hemoglobin A1c percentage is important because it is the only way to know how well patients are controlling their diabetes over time. Based on blood tests taken over a period of two or three months, doctors can estimate patients' average blood sugar levels. The goal for most diabetics is an A1c of less than 7%. This is roughly equivalent to an average blood sugar level of about 150 mg/dl. An A1c of 9% indicates an average blood sugar level of about 210 mg/dl. Here's how blood sugar works in the body. Glucose (blood sugar) circulates in the blood after food is absorbed in the intestine. A small amount normally combines with the hemoglobin molecule (A1c). Hemoglobin is the red-colored protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the rest of the body. It operates in direct proportion to the amount of glucose in the blood. The glucose remains with the hemoglobin molecule until the individual's red blood cells die - usually between two and three months. When the patient's blood is analyzed for hemoglobin A1c, the resulting value number provides an estimate of the level of glucose over that time period. How do I properly treat a low blood sugar reaction? Should I eat a chocolate bar to bring my sugar back up? Chocolate is not usually the best choice because the fat in it slows down the absorption of the sugar. Treat a low blood sugar reaction with some type of fast-acting sugar, such as glucose tabs, four ounces of juice, four ounces of nonfat milk or a half can of Continue reading >>

Why Should I See An Endocrinologist If I Have Diabetes?

Why Should I See An Endocrinologist If I Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, seeing an endocrinologist is important because they specialize in diabetes and metabolism, and have the latest information on the issues that impact the disease. Watch as endocrinologist Reza Yavari, MD, describes his specialty. An endocrinologist is a physician who specializes in treating diseases of the hormone-producing glands. As insulin is a hormone, diabetes is considered a hormonal disorder. Endocrinologists also treat thyroid disease, pituitary disorders, high or low blood calcium, adrenal problems, and low testosterone or other sex hormone disorders. Some endocrinologists specialize in fertility issues, including the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome, a common condition in women of childbearing age that often coexists with prediabetes. In many areas of the country there is a shortage of endocrinologists, particularly given the rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetes. Most people with type 2 diabetes will not need to see an endocrinologist, but many people with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 who have had difficulty managing their blood sugar levels will benefit from seeing someone in this specialty. The Best Life Guide to Managing Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes Bob Greene has helped millions of Americans become fit and healthy with his life-changing Best Life plan. Now, for the first time, Oprah's trusted expert on diet and fitness teams up with a leading... Continue reading >>

Your Visit To The Endocrinologist: What To Expect

Your Visit To The Endocrinologist: What To Expect

After narrowing down your search for an endocrinologist, you have finally selected the one that you think will give you the best care for your diabetes. Diabetes is one of the most common conditions endocrinologists manage. You can work with your doctor to control this disease. You should write down any questions you have as preparation for your appointment. You should go to see an endocrinologist when you’re having problems controlling your diabetes. Your primary care physician may also recommend that you see a specialist for managing diabetes. Signs and symptoms that your diabetes isn’t well-controlled and may benefit from the expertise of an endocrinologist include: tingling in your hands and feet from nerve damage frequent episodes of low or high blood sugar levels weight changes vision problems kidney problems frequent hospital admissions because of diabetes A visit to the endocrinologist usually involves: a complete medical history a head-to-toe exam blood and urine tests an explanation of your management plan This is just a brief overview. Your appointment will start with a measurement of your height, weight, and vital signs, including blood pressure and pulse. They’ll probably check your blood sugar using a finger stick. Your doctor will want to check your teeth to ensure you don’t have mouth infections, and they will check the skin of your hands and feet to ensure that you aren’t developing sores or skin infections. They’ll listen to your heart and lungs with a stethoscope and feel your abdomen with their hands. Be prepared for questions about your current symptoms, family history, and eating habits. Your doctor will want to know how much you exercise you get and what your blood sugars typically run. It’s important to bring a record of your blood Continue reading >>

Value Of An Endocrinologist

Value Of An Endocrinologist

When you are facing a diagnosis of a hormonal condition, like diabetes or thyroid disease, your doctor may suggest you see an endocrinologist. You may be wondering why you need to see a specialist instead of simply sticking with your primary doctor. Here are some reasons why an endocrinologist will provide the level of support and care that you need with this diagnosis. An Endocrinologist is a True Specialist An endocrinologist is a specialist who has thoroughly studied hormonal conditions and knows the best possible treatments, even when conventional treatments do not work well. Unlike a family doctor or general practitioner, an endocrinologist studies hormones and hormonal diseases in depth, and this specialist will be able to provide the best possible treatment. Most general practitioners have the skills necessary to diagnose and treat basic hormonal conditions, but sometimes the help of a specialist is needed. An Endocrinologist Helps Non-Traditional Patients Some patients have diseases that progress as the textbooks say they should. The standard treatments work and they are able to manage their conditions with oral or injected medication with minimal disruption to their day-to-day living. Other patients find that conventional treatment does not work. They stick with the treatments religiously, but they achieve no results. In these cases, an endocrinologist is necessary to ensure all possible treatment avenues are pursued. Some patients need unique care due to other health conditions that affect their hormonal conditions. They may have a genetic condition, like cystic fibrosis, that affects the way their bodies react to treatments. The traditional-path patients may not see the value of an endocrinologist. Those who are in one of the latter categories, however, do. I Continue reading >>

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