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How Do You Wash Your Feet With Diabetes?

Foot Care

Foot Care

People with diabetes have to take extra care of their feet. You should have a foot exam by your doctor every year. If you notice any changes such as loss of feeling, changes in the shape of your feet, dry skin, callouses or foot ulcers then call your doctor to have your feet checked. Check your feet every day Look at your bare feet for red spots, cuts, bruises, swelling, or blisters. If you cannot see the bottoms of your feet, use a mirror or ask someone for help. Wash your feet every day Dry them carefully, especially between the toes. Keep your skin soft and smooth Rub a thin coat of skin lotion over the tops and bottoms of your feet, but not between your toes. Trim toenails when needed Trim your toenails straight across and file the edges with an emery board or nail file. Wear shoes and socks at all times Never walk barefoot. Wear comfortable shoes that fit well and protect your feet. Check inside your shoes before wearing them. Make sure the lining is smooth and there are no objects inside. Protect your feet from hot and cold Wear shoes at the beach or on hot pavement. Dont put your feet into hot water. Test water before putting your feet in it just as you would before bathing a baby. Never use hot water bottles, heating pads, or electric blankets. You can burn your feet without realizing it. Keep your feet warm Keep the blood flowing to your feet Put your feet up when sitting. Wiggle your toes and move your ankles up and down for 5 minutes, 2 or 3 times a day. Dont cross your legs for long periods of time. Dont smoke. Be more active Use them. A brisk walk every day is good for you. Get started now Begin taking good care of your feet today. Set a time every day to check your feet. Continue reading >>

Ankle And Foot Specialty Clinics | Diabetic Foot Care In Sandusky

Ankle And Foot Specialty Clinics | Diabetic Foot Care In Sandusky

According to the American Diabetes Association, 9.3% of Americans have diabetes, a disease affecting the way the human body processes glucose. Over an extended period of time, high glucose levels can damage the nervous system, reducing sensation in the feet. Due to the suppression of the immune response and reduced blood flow to the feet in diabetics, the body may be unable to heal wounds you suffer to your feet. As sensation has already been reduced, if you arent checking your feet regularly, you may not realize your feet are injured until its too late. If left untreated, bacterial infections can lead to gangrene, which may require amputation to ensure that the infection does not spread to other parts of the body. There are some simple precautions you can take to keep your feet healthy as a diabetic. Keep your feet moisturized (but no lotion between the toes, as moisture here can create conditions friendly to fungal infection). Encourage circulation in your feet by wiggling your toes and changing positions regularly. Meet regularly with your trusted podiatrist. If you suffer from diabetes, it is crucial that you ensure foot health by working with your podiatrist to reduce the likelihood of infection and quickly treat any infection that arises. Contact us today to learn how we can help you protect your feet for a lifetime. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Tips | Joslin Diabetes Center

Diabetic Foot Care Tips | Joslin Diabetes Center

4 Tips For Foot Care When You Have Diabetes The experts at the Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Foot Center provide superior, cutting-edge care to patients with diabetes, and can help reduce your problems and improve the long-term health of your feet. For people with diabetes, practicing proper foot care is an important step towards successful diabetes management. According to Joslin Clinic's Dr. Richard A. Jackson, one in four people with diabetes will develop foot complications. That means that making foot care a part of your daily diabetes regimen is essential for avoiding serious complications such as neuropathy, vascular disease, and injury. When it comes to implementing a comprehensive foot care plan, a little effort goes a long way in preventing problems. Inspect. Check your feet two times a day, ideally in the morning and at night before you go to bed. Look for anything out of the ordinary, such as areas of redness, blisters, or cuts. If you discover a wound, treat it and cover it with a bandage immediately. Pay close attention to the wound during subsequent foot inspections to be certain it is healing properly. Protect. Washing your feet every day with mild soap in tepidnot hotwater is your first line of defense against problems with your feet. After washing, dry your feet thoroughly and apply a lotion made for people with diabetes, or one that your doctor has approved. Moisturizing your feet will protect against the creation of fissures in the skin, which can serve as a breeding ground for infection. Prevent. Elevated blood glucose (blood sugars) puts people with diabetes at risk for neuropathy, or nerve damage, which can cause loss of sensation in the feet, leading to other serious complications. Good control will help you prevent these complications. You can al Continue reading >>

General Care Of The Diabetic Foot

General Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetic foot problems are a major health concern and are a common cause of hospitalization. Most foot problems that people with diabetes face arise from two serious complications of the disease: nerve damage and poor circulation. The lack of feeling and poor blood flow can allow a small blister to progress to a serious infection in a matter of days. Chronic nerve damage (neuropathy) can cause dry and cracked skin, which provides an opportunity for bacteria to enter and cause infection. The consequences can range from hospitalization for antibiotics to amputation of a toe or foot. For people with diabetes, careful, daily inspection of the feet is essential to overall health and the prevention of damaging foot problems. Never walk barefoot. The nerve damage decreases sensation so you may not notice that little pebbles or objects have gotten stuck in your foot. This can lead to a massive infection. Always wearing shoes or slippers reduces this risk. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. Test the water temperature with your hand first. Do not soak your feet. When drying them, pat each foot with a towel rather than rubbing vigorously. Be careful drying between your toes. Use lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist. This prevents dry skin cracks and decreases the risk of infection. Do not put lotion between the toes. Trim your toe nails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, see your doctor. Good nail care is important in preventing infections. Do not use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads, or sharp instruments on your feet. Do not put your feet near radiators or in front of the fireplace. Always keep your feet warm. Wear loose socks to bed. Do not get yo Continue reading >>

How To Take Care Of Your Feet When You Have Diabetes

How To Take Care Of Your Feet When You Have Diabetes

de la Cruz, Gloria J. RN; Valente, Sharon RN, PhD; Brosnan, Joan RN, PhD IF YOU HAVE DIABETES, you could also have foot problems, including sores that won't heal. These can lead to dangerous infections and even amputation. Here's how to protect your feet and prevent serious problems. Why does diabetes hurt my feet? Diabetes can damage blood vessels, so your feet might not get the supply of blood they need for health and healing. And because diabetes can also damage nerves, you may not feel the pain or irritation that would normally warn you of a sore. If you have diabetes, you might not feel simple things that can hurt your feet, such as lumpy socks or shoes that are too tight. Irritation that goes on day after day can cause a sore that may become infected and that won't heal easily. How your health care provider can help The American Diabetes Association recommends that you have your feet examined at least once a year—more often if you have risk factors for foot problems, such as: being a man being older than 40 having diabetes for 10 years or more having poor blood surgar control smoking being overweight using alcohol more than twice a week or drinking too much having poor circulation having heart, eye, or kidney problems. When you see your health care provider for checkups, always take off your shoes and socks—even if she forgets to ask you. This will remind her to check your feet every time. Your health care provider may use a thin wire called a monofilament to test for loss of feeling (neuropathy) in your feet, especially on the soles of your feet. She'll brush this wire against your foot while you're not looking and ask you to tell her if you feel anything. If you have neuropathy, she'll use this test to check your feet at every visit. At home, you can test yo Continue reading >>

Foot Care And Diabetes

Foot Care And Diabetes

A small cut on a toe once sent Stella Anderson* to the emergency room. Most people would have just slapped a band-aid on the "injury" and forgotten about it. But most people don't have diabetes. Unlike people with normal blood sugar, diabetics need to examine their feet daily for the slightest injury. Since diabetes can cause neuropathy -- nerve death or damage -- a small cut could go undetected and lead to serious infection. After living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years, Anderson knew she had to be careful. The disease had already killed many nerves in her feet, which meant she couldn't feel scrapes, cuts, blisters, or other sores. "I always joked that somebody could cut off my toes, and I'd never feel it," Anderson says. Worse, the disease had harmed her circulation, so that the blood flow to her feet had slowed to a trickle. As a result, even the most trivial sores would be slow to heal. Anderson usually checked her feet after her morning shower, but she let the chore slide during a hectic week. She never noticed the small cut on her toe. By the time she saw a thin red streak running from her foot to her ankle, an infection was already raging. It took a trip to the emergency room and intravenous antibiotics to save her foot. What are diabetes-related foot problems? Anderson still walks on two feet, but many people with diabetes aren't so fortunate. Every year, about 80,000 diabetics lose a leg, foot, or toes. And in almost every case, this catastrophic injury had very humble beginnings. If diabetes has already dulled the sensations and slowed down circulation in your feet, just about any break in the skin can turn into a dangerous, festering wound. It may start with a callus, a small blister, a corn, a cut, or a scrape. Often, these seemingly trivial problems turn i Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Proper Foot Care | Learn More!

Type 1 Diabetes And Proper Foot Care | Learn More!

Type 1 Diabetes and Proper Foot Care | Learn more! Posted by ADW Diabetes | Aug 20, 2014 | Type 1 | 0 | Proper foot care is essential for people with type 1 diabetes. Patients with diabetes may be prone to neuropathy, peripheral artery disease and other related complications. Discover simple ways to take care of your feet that help you to avoid possible problems. Check your own feet daily prior to washing them. Make sure to use a mirror if you can not physically see the soles of your feet. Never pop blisters or do your own minor surgery. Keep your feet clean at all times. Wash and dry them each day. Use a mild soap and warm water. Pat them dry with a soft towel and never rub your feet. Dry properly between the toes. Make sure they are totally dry then apply lotion to help prevent cracking especially on the heel. Avoid putting lotion in the areas between your toes. Use powder between the toes to reduce perspiration. During routine medical examinations, take off your shoes and socks so the doctor can check your feet. They will check for cuts, sores, scratches, blisters, dry skin, redness, tenderness, hot spots, fungus, calluses, corns and ingrown toenails. Consult a special foot doctor called a podiatrist if you have problems or concerns. The best time to clip your toenails is after a bath or shower when they are the softest. Cut them straight across then smooth the edges with a nail file. Never cut your cuticles or the areas near the corners of your toes. A podiatrist can cut your toenails about every 3 months if you are anxious, have poor vision, decreased circulation or nerve problems. You are entitled to see a podiatrist if you have Medicare or a Medicare Advantage plan. You are also entitled to a new pair of diabetes friendly shoes each year thru your podiatrist. Al Continue reading >>

5 Summer Foot Care Tips For Adventurous Diabetics

5 Summer Foot Care Tips For Adventurous Diabetics

5 Summer Foot Care Tips for Adventurous Diabetics 5 Summer Foot Care Tips for Adventurous Diabetics July 29, 2016by Advanced Tissue 00 These foot care tips for diabetics will help you be ready for your next adventure. Seasonal changes bring potential medical problems for diabetics that can impactskin health and blood circulation. During winter, for example, foot care for diabetics should involve moisturizing your feet and lower legs daily with petroleum jelly or another appropriate skin lotion to prevent your skin from becoming dehydrated. When a diabetics skin becomes dehydrated, splitting and cracking of skin could expose underlying dermal layers containing capillaries. Broken capillaries allow easy entry for infection-causing bacteria, which can develop into hard-to-heal wounds. The following tips offer insight on improved foot care for diabetics that will help you be prepared to actively participate in outdoor activities no matter what the season. Peripheral vascular disease is a common problem affecting many diabetics when your feet do not receive enough oxygen as a result of impaired circulation . Diabetic foot ulcers may also emerge on the soles of the feet in areas where the skin is subject to extreme pressure. As skin integrity deteriorates under constant pressure, an open sore may develop into an ulcer unless treated immediately using high quality foot care products for diabetics . Diabetic foot ulcers tend to occur more frequently during summer when constantly sweating feet attract and perpetuate fungal pathogens responsible for athletes foot. 5 Tips to Keep Your Feet Happy and Healthy In addition to adhering to a diabetic-friendly diet and drinking plenty of water while outside enjoying the sun and fresh air, these foot care tips for diabetics will help you Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Steps For Foot-washing - Topic Overview

Diabetes: Steps For Foot-washing - Topic Overview

Because you have diabetes , you need to wash your feet carefully each day. Post this list of proper foot-washing steps in your bathroom. Use warm (not hot) water. Check the water temperature with your wrists, not your feet. Wash all areas of your feet, especially the underside of your toes and between them. Use a mild soap. Pat your feet dry. Don't rub the skin on your feet. Dry carefully between your toes. If the skin on your feet stays moist, bacteria or a fungus can grow, which can lead to infection. Apply lanolin or other moisturizing skin cream to keep the skin on your feet soft and to prevent calluses and cracks. But do not put the cream between your toes. Clean underneath your toenails carefully. Do not use a sharp object to clean underneath your toenails . If you can't see well, have someone do this for you or have your foot specialist do it regularly. Trim and file your toenails straight across. Trimming them straight across instead of rounding them will help prevent ingrown toenails. Use a nail clipper, not scissors. Use an emery board to smooth the edges. Do not use a sharp-pointed file or stick to clean around the nail. If you can't see well or if your nails are thick, split, or yellowed, have them trimmed by your doctor or a foot specialist (podiatrist). Use a pumice stone to prevent calluses only if your doctor has shown you how to use it properly. Do not use strong antiseptic soaps, chemicals (such as Epsom salt ; iodine; or corn, callus, or wart removers), or perfumed skin lotions on your feet. Do not cut or pick at the skin (cuticles) around your toenails. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor.Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on thisinformation. 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwi Continue reading >>

Diabetic-related Athlete’s Foot

Diabetic-related Athlete’s Foot

Dry Skin or Athlete’s Foot? Diabetic Patients, Beware! Athlete’s foot is a common, fungal skin infection we see in our diabetic patients. A majority of cases begin between the toes and spread to the bottom of the feet. Anyone can get athlete’s foot, but it is more severe for a diabetic. Naturally, patients with diabetes have a weaker circulatory system along with an impaired immune system. This causes a higher risk for infection. Athlete’s foot is a concern for diabetics because their skin lacks hydration, making dry skin prominent. Athlete’s foot is caused from fungus growing on the top layer of your skin. It is contagious and you can get it from touching the affected area of a person who has it, and more commonly, from contaminated surfaces such as damp floors in public showers or locker rooms. Many diabetics confuse athlete’s foot as being dry skin on their feet. Because athlete’s foot has similar characteristics to dry skin such as peeling, cracking redness, blisters, breakdown of the skin, itching and burning, it is understandable as to why these two conditions can be confused. If untreated, athlete’s foot can lead to a severe bacterial infection of the foot and leg. Risk Factors Men are more susceptible than women Having athlete’s foot before An impaired immune system Living in a warm, damp climate More common in adults than children Depending on the severity of the fungus, athlete’s foot can lead to blisters, cracked skin and open wounds. With a diabetic foot, a wound as minor as a blister can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, which causes healing time for injuries to be slower. Diabetes also enables infections to spread quickly, which is a concern as it is one of the most common complications of the diabetic foot. If an in Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? 10 Ways To Protect Your Feet!

Have Diabetes? 10 Ways To Protect Your Feet!

1. Manage Your Diabetes Partner with your health care team to set and reach goals for managing your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Develop a diabetes self-management plan with your health care team to include maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, monitoring blood sugar and taking medication as directed. Quit or don’t start smoking. Among a number of other serious health complications, smoking can decrease blood circulation to the feet. 2. Inspect Your Feet Daily Examine feet for cuts, sores, cracks, red spots and infected toenails every day. It’s possible you may have foot problems without feeling pain in your feet. Those that may have trouble seeing or reaching their feet can use a mirror or ask for the help of a doctor, family member or caregiver. Call your doctor if you notice pain or loss of feeling in your feet; changes in the shape of your feet or toes; and/or sores, cuts or ulcers on your feet that do not heal. 3. Wash Your Feet Daily Each day, wash your feet in lukewarm (not hot!) water. Be gentle with your feet by using a soft washcloth or sponge and a pumice stone where calluses tend to form. Dry feet by blotting or patting. Make sure to carefully dry between the toes. 4. Trim Toenails Regularly Trim toenails after washing and drying feet on a regular basis. If you can see, reach and feel your feet, trim toenails straight across. Do not cut toenails too short, as this could lead to ingrown toenails. Smooth corners with a nail file. If you can’t see, reach and feel your feet, ask for assistance from your doctor or caregiver. 5. Moisturize Your Feet Keep feet soft and smooth by applying a thin coat of moisturizing lotion or cream on the tops and bottoms of feet. To avoid fungal infection, do not apply lotion between toes. Instead, Continue reading >>

The Society Of Chiropodists And Podiatrists

The Society Of Chiropodists And Podiatrists

www.feetforlife.org Diabetes and your feet A guide to maintaining healthy feet for people with diabetes Many people with diabetes know that they have to take special care of their feet, but they perhaps don’t know why. Understanding how and why foot problems develop will help you to take action to prevent them. This booklet explains: • how diabetes can affect your feet and how you can: • prevent foot problems • keep your skin and toenails in great condition • look after your feet when you’re on holiday By understanding how your feet can change with diabetes and by learning how to spot those changes, you can take positive action to keep your feet healthy. This information is for anyone with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It will also help you whether you have had diabetes for a few months or many years. Your family, friends or your carer may also find it useful. The information in this booklet should not replace any information your health professional gives you. However, it can help you to understand what they tell you. Contents: How can diabetes affect my feet? 4 What signs should I look for? 7 What do these changes mean for me? 11 What changes to my feet am I checking for? 12 What can I do to prevent foot problems? 13 Why is preventing foot problems so important? 14 What can I do now? 15 How do I look after my feet? 16 How do I get started? 18 How do I look after my toenails? 19 Can I have beauty treatments? 20 What do I do when I’m on holiday? 21 What other help can I get to look after my feet? 22 Diabetes and your feet Diabetes and your feet • 3 www.feetforlife.org Over a long period of time high blood glucose levels can cause damage to different areas of your body and this includes your feet and legs. High blood glucos Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Feet Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetes And Your Feet Care Of The Diabetic Foot

Diabetes has many effects on feet, and it is extremely important that any diabetic seek podiatric care. Diabetes is a syndrome (a set of symptoms which occur together) characterized mainly by an increase in sugar levels or a failure of the body to produce insulin to control its sugar levels. "It's essential that I take care of my feet." It is imperative that diabetics take special care of their feet. Bear in mind that, if you are diabetic, you need a doctor's care to protect your feet — and that this page is not intended as a substitute for a medical diagnosis or suggested course of treatment. Please see your doctor! Diabetes is a serious condition which can have many effects on the feet, including: (1) Nerve damage, resulting in numbness, extensive burning, pain, coldness, "pins and needles" or tingling while at rest. These nerves may actually affect the "position" sense, so that the joints or bones actually collapse with time. (2) Blocked blood vessels or decreased blood flow with fewer nutrients reaching the feet. Without proper nourishment, sores on the foot may not heal in the normal time period, or may be vulnerable to secondary problems such as infection. (3) Weakened bones, causing a shift in the foot, which may become deformed, changing the way the foot distributes pressure. (4) Collapsed joints, especially in the area of the arch. As a result, the arch can no longer absorb pressure. The surrounding skin may also begin to break down. (5) Blisters and Calluses. Diabetics are much more vulnerable to blister or callus formation, which generally stars as a warm or red spot caused by unrelieved skin pressure and the failure of the diabetic to feel the area. (6) Ulcers or sores more easily occur as a result of the breakdown of several layers of skin. These ulcers m Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot Problems And Foot Care

Diabetes: Foot Problems And Foot Care

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S People with diabetes are at risk for foot problems. This handout explains why these problems occur and what you can do to protect your feet. Why are foot problems so common in people with diabetes? In people with diabetes, high blood glucose can cause two complications — both of which can result in foot problems. You may have one or both of these: • Nerve damage (neuropathy). Nerve damage from high blood glucose usually begins in the hands and feet. It can cause painful symptoms — tingling, aching, or throbbing — but it can also reduce sensation. If you can’t really feel cold, heat, or pain in your feet, it’s easy to ignore an injury or infection. And unfortunately, in people with diabetes, even a small blister or stubbed toe can become serious. • Poor circulation. High blood glucose can damage your blood vessels and reduce blood flow to your feet. This means that injuries take longer to heal. Over time, poor circulation in your feet can even change the shape of your feet and toes. This can cause problems with the way you walk. Are foot problems really that serious? In people with diabetes, yes — foot problems can be very serious. In the worst cases, they can lead to deformed feet, wounds that won’t heal, and serious infections that require surgery. In fact, diabetes-related foot problems are a leading reason for leg and foot amputations. Fortunately, good care can lower your chance of serious problems. Following the steps outlined at right, you and your medical caregivers can work together to care for your feet. However, the most important things are those you do (and don’t do) on your own to protect your feet. See the next page for these do Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Feet

Diabetes And The Feet

Foot care is an ongoing issue for diabetics. Avoiding foot problems, dealing with minor issues before they become major, and preventing serious infections that could lead to amputation, are all concerns. For all the recent progress in wound care and intervention, prevention is still the best place to begin. Diabetes, over a period of time, can cause circulatory damage and neuropathy, both of which can affect condition of the feet. Because of impaired circulation, the body's ability to heal itself is diminished. Minor traumas, that might otherwise heal quickly, persist and can become infected. Diabetic neuropathy, nerve damage, can impair an individual's ability to detect foot problems. Because it doesn't hurt, you don't intervene, and small problems escalate into big ones. The best place to start is with your shoes and socks. Proper fit is essential! Do not compromise--you have too much to lose. Make sure the shoe is wide enough, and don't let it pinch your toes. Shoes that "breathe," (either leather or running shoes) are best. Avoid sandals, especially those with a thong between the toes. Socks should be seamless, athletic type, of cotton or one of the new fibers like "Thorlo". Before putting your shoes on (and after you take them off), inspect your feet. You are looking for anything out of the ordinary, anything that might escalate from irritant into infection. Be thorough! Blisters, bunions, corns, splinters, raw or discolored patches, ingrown toenails, even "athlete's foot" fungus can require action. Don't assume it will go away by itself! When in doubt, consult your podiatrist. Sight is not necessary to carry out daily foot inspections. Much can be revealed by feel and smell. You are looking for change, anything that shouldn't be there, or that wasn't there before. Continue reading >>

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