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How Do You Treat Type 3 Diabetes?

Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes: Natural Treatments That Work

Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes: Natural Treatments That Work

The human body is an exceptionally delicate mechanism. All of its parts are beautifully interconnected, and even the tiniest of details is crucial for the big picture. For example, a single cell can either kill (like during cancer) or save (like during immune responses to infections) you through a series of complex processes. And, in turn, these processes are also intertwined. One change leads to another. One condition always brings forth something else. This truth often results in unbelievable findings that shake the scientific world to its very core, and here you will discover one of such breakthrough. A discovery that may change forever the way we see some of the most dreadful conditions of the modern era: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Let’s take a look at the numbers and trends, as they are the best way to illustrate what’s happening. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the global prevalence of obesity has more than doubled since 1980. In 2014 more than 1.9 billion adults had excess weight, and 600 million of them were obese. And don’t get me wrong, this is not a matter of looks, but strictly of health. Innocent (often even cute) at first sight, excess weight takes a terrible toll on the body. It increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases (heart attack and stroke in particular) and certain forms of cancer, but what’s even more important in the light of our discussion today is that, untreated excess weight almost inevitably results in diabetes. Throughout the last decades, the global prevalence of diabetes in men has increased more than twofold (from 4.3% in 1980 to 9.0% in 2014), and the same tendency in women isn’t much better (from 5.0% in 1980 to 7.9% in 2014). Of course, some countries do a better job in preventing the condi Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 3 Diabetes Symptoms

Why is Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) sometimes called “Type 3 diabetes?” What are the symptoms, and how can it be prevented? Alzheimer’s is a progressive brain disease. People who have this condition gradually lose memory and mental focus. They may have emotional and behavioral changes that put a great load on their families. The course of Alzheimer’s disease varies dramatically. Some people become severely disabled and die from it. Others may experience only a mild slowing of brain function. What causes Type 3 diabetes? How might diabetes cause Alzheimer’s symptoms? Gary Small, MD, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and author of The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program said that high blood sugars cause inflammation throughout the body and brain. Chronic inflammation has been linked with two brain changes typical of Alzheimer’s disease. In Alzheimer’s, clumps of protein called beta-amyloid plaques form between the brain cells and may block communication. Researchers have discovered that many people with Type 2 diabetes have beta-amyloid deposits in their pancreas like the ones found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. Tau tangles are twisted-up proteins that form within nerve cells of people with Alzheimer’s, interfering with cell function. We don’t know what causes this nerve damage, but studies done at Brown University and the University of Pennsylvania indicate that insulin resistance, the core of Type 2 diabetes, is a big part of it. Insulin resistance may deprive brain cells of glucose they need to function, causing damage. On Verywell.com, health writer Esther Heerema, MSW, said, “The brains of those with Alzheimer’s disease who did not have diabetes showed many of the same abnormal Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes Attacks Your Brain?

Type 3 Diabetes Attacks Your Brain?

Most of us have heard about type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but Type 3 diabetes barely puts a blip on the radar. Although discovered in 2005, this new condition is just beginning to pop up on the headlines of today’s science and medical news journals. Lay people still have a lot to learn. When it comes to type 3 diabetes, Wikipedia doesn’t even have the answers. The relatively new discovery of the disease leaves people concerned about their health searching for answers. Read on for a quick primer on diabetes mellitus 3 and how it may be affecting your health or the health of your loved ones. Type 3 Diabetes: What is it? During a study conducted at the Rhode Island Hospital and Brown Medical School, researchers made a groundbreaking discovery: the hormone insulin was not just produced by the pancreas as previously thought. After careful study of their subjects, the researchers discovered that the brain was also responsible to producing small amounts of insulin. This discovery led to several more important revelations. One of those revelations was the discovery of insulin’s effect on the brain. One of those effects on the brain is the development of diabetes mellitus 3. Type 3 diabetes is a condition where the brain does not produce enough insulin. In the absence of insulin, the brain is affected much the way the body is in type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In fact, diabetes mellitus 3 only occurs in people who have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes already. Type 3 Diabetes: Alzheimer’s in Disguise Diabetes mellitus 3 is also known as brain diabetes. This is because the brain requires insulin to form new memories. Receptors on the brain’s synapses help facilitate the communication that creates new memories. The insulin produced by the brain wards off amyloid beta-derived dif Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus In Chronic Pancreatitis

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus In Chronic Pancreatitis

Go to: INTRODUCTION Chronic pancreatitis is a disease characterized by pancreatic inflammatory and fibrotic injury resulting in irreversible parenchymal damage. Progressive nutrient maldigestion and disturbance of the timing and the interactions between nutrient digestion and absorption is observed and may lead to severe metabolic derangements. Glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus are observed quite frequently in the course of the disease[1,2]. Development of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis mainly occurs due to the destruction of islet cells by pancreatic inflammation. Additionally, nutrient maldigestion leads to an impaired incretin secretion and therefore to a diminished insulin release of the remaining beta-cells[3]. In contrast to the autoimmune mediated destruction of the beta-cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus, glucagon secreting alpha-cells and pancreatic polypeptide secreting pancreatic polypeptide-cells are also subject to destruction in chronic pancreatitis leading to a complex deranged metabolic situation. Diabetes mellitus secondary to pancreatic diseases (such as chronic pancreatitis) is classified as pancreatogenic diabetes or type 3c diabetes mellitus according to the current classification of diabetes mellitus (Table 1)[4,5]. Whereas the awareness of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is rather good, type 3c diabetes mellitus, however, is a condition rarely considered in everyday practice. Yet, recent data on type 3c diabetes mellitus show that it might be more common than generally thought. Studies also suggest that this important condition might be consistently under- and misdiagnosed[6,7]. Due to the complex pathophysiology of type 3c diabetes mellitus it bears clinical and laboratory features which are very distinct from both type 1 an Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes -- Diagnosis And Treatment

Understanding Diabetes -- Diagnosis And Treatment

Your doctor may suspect you have diabetes if you have some risk factors for diabetes, or if you have high levels of blood sugar in your urine. Your blood sugar (also called blood glucose) levels may be high if your pancreas is producing little or no insulin (type 1 diabetes), or if the body is not responding normally to insulin (type 2 diabetes). Getting diagnosed begins with one of three tests. in most cases, your doctor will want to repeat a test that is high in order to confirm the diagnosis: A fasting glucose test is a test of your blood sugar levels taken in the morning before you have eaten. A level of 126 mg/dL or higher may mean that you have diabetes. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) entails drinking a beverage containing glucose and then having your blood glucose levels checked every 30 to 60 minutes for up to 3 hours. If the glucose level is 200 mg/dL or higher at 2 hours, then you might have diabetes. The A1c test is a simple blood test that shows your average blood sugar levels for the past 2-3 months. An A1c level of 6.5% or higher may mean you have diabetes. Your doctor may also suggest a zinc transporter 8 autoantibody (ZnT8Ab) test. This blood test -- along with other information and test results -- can help determine if a person has type 1 diabetes instead of another type. The goal of having the ZnT8Ab test is a prompt and accurate diagnosis and that can lead to timely treatment. Diabetes is a serious disease that you cannot treat on your own. Your doctor will help you make a diabetes treatment plan that is right for you -- and that you can understand. You may also need other health care professionals on your diabetes treatment team, including a foot doctor, nutritionist, eye doctor, and a diabetes specialist (called an endocrinologist). Treatment Continue reading >>

Alzheimer’s New Name: Type 3 Diabetes

Alzheimer’s New Name: Type 3 Diabetes

When news about a startling new insight into the cause of Alzheimer’s disease first emerged in 2005, it was highly speculative. But now the evidence for it has become very strong: Alzheimer’s is a form of diabetes, and the name being given to it is type 3. In Alzheimer’s, proteins called beta amyloid plaques begin replacing normal brain cells, eventually leading to the classic symptoms of the disease, including disorientation, and loss of memory and aspects of personality. How the plaques develop had been a mystery until the early 2000s, when Brown University neuropathologist Suzanne de la Monte began experimenting with blocking the path of insulin in lab rats’ brains. When she did, the animals began exhibiting the symptoms of Alzheimer’s. She concluded that a lack of insulin could be a crucial factor in allowing the plaques to develop. In short, the onset of Alzheimer’s could be considered a form of diabetes, specific to the brain. Insulin resistance, the defining symptom of type 2, is equivalent in the case of Alzheimer’s to lack of insulin. Since we know that type 2 is developed partly as a result of bad diet—heavy carbs, high sugar, processed foods—one of the preventative measures that healthcare providers may soon begin advising people at genetic risk of Alzheimer’s is to go on a type 2 diet. There’s also believed to be an association with diabetic neuropathy, which slowly destroys nerve tissue through glucose-induced inflammation. If so, type 2s may run a higher risk of effects on their spinal cords and brains since neuropathy is a typical accompaniment to the condition. Alzheimer’s would be one obvious spillover. The Other Diabetes Adding a designation to diabetes is nothing new historically. When the disease was first decisively diagnosed Continue reading >>

What Exactly Is Type 3 Diabetes?

What Exactly Is Type 3 Diabetes?

According to Dr. Mark Hyman, a well-known physician/author who focuses on diabetes, heart disease and diet, “10% of 65 year olds, 25% of 75 year olds and 50% of 85 year olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.” Along with diabetes and obesity, it is a global epidemic. Alzheimer’s is the top form of dementia and now the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that is progressive, often starts with forgetfulness and confusion, in which the brain’s nerve cells degenerate. It can then affect personalities, moods and language leading to behavior issues in the patient. It is not considered “natural aging.” There is gene involvement but only 5% of cases are directly related to genes. The main causes seem to involve oxidative stress as well as systemic inflammation. Some of it is aging but it also encompasses lifestyle which contributes to brain health. “The medical community has yet to identify a specific cause and there is no effective long term treatment.” Scientists have been referring to Alzheimer’s as type 3 diabetes since 2005 since “people with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s.” The connection seems to be insulin resistance which also relates to lifestyle. According to The Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology “currently there is rapid growth pointing toward insulin resistance as mediators of Alzheimer’s neuro-degeneration.” Experts at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health conclude that insulin resistance can be reduced by “limiting added sugars, refined carbohydrates and processed foods while eating balanced meals that focus on lean proteins, non-starchy above ground vegetables, pulses[beans], and remaining physically active.” These recommendatio Continue reading >>

How Do I Lower My Blood Glucose To Prevent Diabetes And Prediatebes?

How Do I Lower My Blood Glucose To Prevent Diabetes And Prediatebes?

Regular exercise can help you lose weight and increase insulin sensitivity. Increased insulin sensitivity means your cells are better able to use the availablesugar in your bloodstream. Exercise also helps your muscles use blood sugar for energy and muscle contraction. If you have problems with blood sugar control, you should routinely check your levels. This will help you learn how you respond to different activities and keep your blood sugar levels from getting either too high or too low. Good forms of exercise include weight lifting, brisk walking, running, biking, dancing, hiking, swimming and more. 2. Control your carb intake Your body breaks carbs down into sugars (mostly glucose), and then insulin moves the sugars into cells. When you eat too many carbs or have problems with insulin function, this process fails and blood glucose levels rise. However, there are several things you can do about this. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends controlling carb intake by counting carbs or using a food exchange system . Some studies find that these methods can also help you plan your meals appropriately, which may further improve blood sugar control. Many studies also show that a low-carb diet helps reduce blood sugar levels and prevent blood sugar spikes. What’s more, a low-carb diet can help control blood sugar levels in the long run. 3. Increase your fiber intake Fiber slows carb digestion and sugar absorption. For these reasons, it promotes a more gradual rise in blood sugar levels. There are two kinds of fiber: insoluble and soluble. While both are important, soluble fiber specifically has been shown to lower blood sugar levels . Additionally, a high-fiber diet can help manage type 1 diabetes by improving blood sugar control and reducing blood sugar lows Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes

Type 3 Diabetes

Type 3 diabetes is a proposed term for Alzheimer's disease resulting in an insulin resistance in the brain. The categorization is not embraced by the medical community, though a limited number of published reviews have forwarded putative mechanisms linking Alzheimer's and insulin resistance.[1][2][3][4] The term has been widely applied within alternative healthcare circles. Other instances of the term: Type 3c (Pancreatogenic) Diabetes is a form of diabetes that relates to the exocrine and digestive functions of the pancreas.[5] See also[edit] Diabetes mellitus#Classification [edit] Continue reading >>

About Diabetes Type 3

About Diabetes Type 3

Diabetes Type 3—which is regarded as “brain” specific diabetes—is a dangerous diabetes hybrid that was first discovered in 2005. A study, which was conducted at Brown University Medical School, suggests the brain produces insulin in a way that’s similar to the pancreas. A problem with insulin production in the brain is thought to result in the formation of protein “plaque”—not unlike that which is found among suffers of Type 1 (insulin-dependant) and Type 2 diabetes (insulin-resistant). But in the case of diabetes Type 3, plaque appears in the brain and leads to memory loss and problems forming memories. Video of the Day When it comes to the body, insulin is responsible for helping to convert food to energy. The brain uses insulin, too, but it’s thought insulin’s primary purpose in the brain is to form memories at synapses (the spaces where cells in the brain communicate), notes Time.com. Neurons save space for insulin receptors; insulin makes way for memories to form. In order for the brain to keep making more brain cells, it needs insulin. When insulin receptors flee—as is the case with sufferers of diabetes Type 3—the brain does not receive the energy it needs to form memories. Alzheimer’s Connection According to a research team at Northwestern University, insulin may prevent or slow memory loss among those with Alzheimer’s disease by protecting the synapses that form memory. Those with the disease tend to have lower insulin levels and are insulin-resistant. The team found that the reason memory fails when insulin shortage occurs is because amyloid beta-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs) destroy the receptors in the brain that typically are reserved for insulin, thus making the receptors insulin-resistant. Without the space for insulin, re Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is Insulin Resistance?

IInsulin resistance — also known as syndrome X — happens when your body can no longer use insulin effectively to manage the amount of sugar you’re taking in from carbohydrates like white bread, pasta and cookies. Here’s what happens: 1. Simple carbs are broken down by your digestive system into sugar, or glucose. 2. Your body releases insulin to signal your cells to take in glucose from carbs. 3. If you eat too many simple carbs, you take in more sugar than your body needs, which leads to excess amounts of glucose. 4. Your body then churns out more and more insulin as it tries to get the glucose out of your blood and into your cells. 5. Soon, you produce too much insulin and your cells stop responding to it — now you are insulin resistant. 6. You will notice symptoms of insulin resistance such as obesity, high blood pressure and high cholesterol but you may not connect them to the real root of the problem. If this pattern continues, your insulin resistance will put you on the path to prediabetes, followed by type 2 diabetes and all the other health issues that go along with it. Insulin resistance in women Insulin resistance is extremely common though many women are still shocked to learn they already have it, or even prediabetes. Experts estimate that more than 80 million of us already have insulin resistance though we believe the percentage is much higher among perimenopausal women. Since insulin is one of the “major” hormones, it affects other “minor” hormones and how they behave. When insulin is imbalanced, it impossible for your body to balance its minor hormones, including estrogen, progesterone and testosterone, until healthy insulin metabolism is restored. So if you have hot flashes and other perimenopause symptoms, and you are insulin resistant Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes: The Alarming Link Between Alzheimer’s And Diet

Type 3 Diabetes: The Alarming Link Between Alzheimer’s And Diet

If you haven’t heard of it, type 3 diabetes is what many specialists are now calling Alzheimer’s disease. The name covers the belief that Alzheimer’s results from insulin resistance of the brain. Alzheimer’s is a cruel, degenerative condition that devastates millions of lives around the world. And unfortunately, it’s only increasing in prevalence; as of 2016, 1 in 9 people over the age of 65 have Alzheimer’s. Surprisingly, the number of individuals aged 65 and over with the condition is expected to triple by the year 2050 (1). Could abnormal blood glucose regulation play a role? This article takes a look at the metabolic theory of type 3 diabetes, and how we might be able to prevent (or potentially halt) the condition. What is Type 3 Diabetes? Type 3 diabetes—or Alzheimer’s disease—is a chronic condition in which brain neurons slowly degenerate and die (2, 3). As a result, we see progressive memory loss and rapid declines in cognitive ability (4). I’ve personally seen the terrible effects of Alzheimer’s. As a young boy, I remember seeing my great grandfather hospitalized with late-stage Alzheimer’s. And then from the start of my late teenage years, I saw my granddad—a strong, well-built man—slowly succumb to the disease. Sadly, the condition can hit anyone. Someone being physically fit or having an intelligent mind is not relevant; the disease doesn’t discriminate, and it takes no prisoners. A Cruel Condition Experiencing a slow deterioration, patients eventually lose the ability to interact with their environment, communicate, and even remember their family. Ultimately, Alzheimer’s disease is fatal, and patients usually die from a resulting complication such as pneumonia (5). Worse still, it’s not only the patient that suffers. Alzheim Continue reading >>

How Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Cured?

How Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Cured?

Curing Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is easy. In fact, it is so easy to correct that I cannot understand why it is a problem. I guess it is easier to take a pill than put in the effort needed to cure yourself. For the past three years, I have been preaching the cure, hoping someone would hear. To cure yourself of type 2 diabetes, all you have to do is give up flour and sugar. Read all labels and if flour and/or sugar is listed, don’t use it. I am making an assumption that you have not allowed your diabetes to go on so long that it has destroyed some of your vital tissue. If it has gone that far, it may be too late and you will have to take medication for the rest of your life. Three months after I gave up flour and sugar, I lost weight, I no longer had to take high blood pressure medication, my triglycerides went from 330 to optimal, my cholesterol became optimal, my A1C went to 5.7, I no longer had type 2 diabetes and I was no longer insulin resistant. It has been three years and my health continues to improve. During these three years, I continued to improve my diet. Currently, I try to maintain 70% of my food intake is from vegetables and fruit. 15% of my diet is from protein, and 15% from fat. I no longer use liquid oils, I use saturated fat. Mostly from coconut oil and bacon grease. I avoid all man-made or man-altered carbohydrates. Exercise is also important. I am retired, so, I do not have a problem with getting an hour of exercise each day. I do Calisthenics and some jogging. Three years ago, I was having problems with arthritis. Each day, just sitting was a problem. To avoid knee pain when sitting at the kitchen table, I would position my butt over the chair and let my body fall into the chair. It also hurt my knees to get into the car and then it hu Continue reading >>

Treating ‘type 3 Diabetes’ Of The Brain With Insulin And Drugs–have Researchers Gone Completely Crazy?

Treating ‘type 3 Diabetes’ Of The Brain With Insulin And Drugs–have Researchers Gone Completely Crazy?

After several years of studying and observing people involved in the world of diet, nutrition, and health, I’ve come to one grim conclusion–the more we learn about what truly makes us sick and unhealthy, the less willing we are to apply those lessons to the very people who would stand to benefit from them the most. The latest example of this all-too-common occurrence comes to us today courtesy of a Reuters new story about a new study that identifies a relatively new form of diabetes of the brain known as “Type 3 diabetes.” I first blogged about this term in September 2007 when I interviewed low-carb neurosurgeon Dr. Larry McCleary about his book called The Brain Trust Program. But as you will quickly see, the conclusion of the researchers in this study is FAR different from what Dr. McCleary would ever advocate (I’ll be featuring an engaging interview with him on February 19, 2009 at my podcast show). According to the study published in the February 2009 of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, lead researcher Dr. William L. Klein, Professor of Neurobiology & Physiology and of Neurology at the Evanston, IL-based Northwestern University, and his team concluded that insulin protects the brain from toxic proteins that lead to Alzheimer’s disease which they acknowledge is indeed this “Type 3 diabetes” of the brain. They added that treating the neurologically-diseased and Alzheimer’s patients with insulin and a diabetic prescription medication called Avandia can improve brain function and should be used as a routine treatment option for people suffering from these conditions. Whoa whoa whoa, wait just a minute! Why would we want to be pumping insulin and diabetes drugs into people who dealing with a terrible disease like Alzheimer’s when pr Continue reading >>

Could A Diabetes Drug Help Beat Alzheimer's Disease?

Could A Diabetes Drug Help Beat Alzheimer's Disease?

Most of the 20 million people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the U.S. take metformin to help control their blood glucose. The drug is ultrasafe: millions of diabetics have taken it for decades with few side effects beyond gastrointestinal discomfort. And it is ultracheap: a month's supply costs $4 at Walmart. And now new studies hint that metformin might help protect the brain from developing diseases of aging, even in nondiabetics. Diabetes is a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, but using metformin is associated with a dramatic reduction in their incidence. In the most comprehensive study yet of metformin's cognitive effects, Qian Shi and her colleagues at Tulane University followed 6,000 diabetic veterans and showed that the longer a patient used metformin, the lower the individual's chances of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and other types of dementia and cognitive impairment. In line with some of the previous, smaller studies of long-term metformin use, patients in the new study who used the drug longer than four years had one quarter the rate of disease as compared with patients who used only insulin or insulin plus other antidiabetic drugs—bringing diabetics' risk level to that of the general population. The findings were presented in June at the American Diabetes Association's Scientific Sessions meeting. Even in the absence of diabetes, Alzheimer's patients often have decreased insulin sensitivity in the brain, says Suzanne Craft, a neuroscientist who studies insulin resistance in neurodegenerative disease at the Wake Forest School of Medicine. The association has led some people to call Alzheimer's “type 3 diabetes.” Insulin plays many roles in the brain—it is involved in memory formation, and it helps to keep synapses Continue reading >>

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