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How Do You Treat Diabetes Fatigue?

Diabetes Fatigue Due To Emotional Toll Of The Disease | Prevention

Diabetes Fatigue Due To Emotional Toll Of The Disease | Prevention

If you have diabetes and youre tired all the time, dont just chalk the fatigue up to your fluctuating blood sugar. Turns out that the emotional toll of dealing with diabetes can be whats behind your fatigue, according to a new study published in The Diabetes Educator. And you dont have to just take it. Researchers from the University of Illinois College of Nursing measured the blood sugar levels of 83 diabetic women over the age of 40, and also asked them general questions about their health. Instead of shifting blood sugar levels being linked with fatigueas is often assumed by doctorsother factors, like depression and BMI, were shown to be greater indicators of whether women felt constantly tired. More from Prevention: The Problem With Being Tired All The Time "People have always assumed blood sugar is the cause of fatigue," says lead study author Cynthia Fritschi, RN, PhD. "It really isn't. Stress, depression, sleepall of these play a bigger factor in fatigue than blood sugar or blood glucose. Heres the problem: Being tired makes you less likely to do what you need to do to keep your diabetes in check, like exercising and eating healthy meals. And doctors dont typically pick up on these lifestyle issues. "People want to know why they're lacking that get-up-and-go, but doctors don't ask how are you feeling? how are you sleeping? how is your daytime activity? says Fritschi. Heres how to make sure your fatigue is being addressed: Be specific. When discussing symptoms with your doctor, state the outcome as well, says Fritschi: Because I'm tired, I'm not able to do x, y and z. "It helps your doctor see that your fatigue is not just a symptom; it's keeping you from taking care of yourself." Take your own health inventory. "Think of the things you can control," says Fritsch Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Why Am I Always Tired?

Diabetes: Why Am I Always Tired?

Living with diabetes can be tiring – not only from the actual disease, but also from managing the condition in general. Diabetes can be an inconvenience to live with, to say the least. Apart from limiting your dietary restrictions and increasing your risk of developing other serious health issues, it can lead to constant and extreme fatigue. Why am I tired? Diabetes-related fatigue is very common and can be due to a number of reasons. Diabetes symptoms themselves High blood sugar levels can cause a lot of extra and unnecessary strain on the body, both mentally and physically. Responsibilities of managing diabetes daily Making sure that your blood sugar levels are in check, looking out for sugar in food, and keeping well hydrated might not seem like much at first. Considering that this is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to managing diabetes, it can become very tiring to manage it properly. Read about 6 Simple Steps to lower Blood Sugar Levels after a Meal Ineffective diabetes management – When your diabetes is not managed properly, the effects of the symptoms can get to you and it might leave you down on energy and feeling fatigued. Underlying conditions – A common underlying condition that accompanies diabetes is depression, which is known to lead to severe fatigue and sleeplessness. What can I do about it? The most important thing to do when trying to fight off diabetic fatigue is to manage your diabetes symptoms properly. To do this, use these 3 simple tips as guidelines… Pin-Point The Cause of Your Diabetic Fatigue: Fatigue might by caused by a number of reasons, and the reason might often be more subtle than you think. It can be anything from an inconsistent meal schedule where you skip meals and then run out of energy, to drinking coffee too late Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

What exactly is fatigue? Is it just being tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep? The answer is no. Fatigue is excessive tiredness that makes carrying out simple tasks difficult and interferes with one or more life functions. Sounds terrible, doesn’t it? Well imagine having a chronic illness along with the fatigue. Diabetes and fatigue have a strong relationship, and it can make a person’s life very difficult. The following article will discuss the relationship, along with ways to beat and reduce the risk of living with diabetes and fatigue. What is diabetes fatigue? As it was mentioned above, diabetes fatigue is an extreme tiredness that individuals with diabetes can experience. It is a tiredness that disrupts a person’s life and makes it difficult to function. It is very common, and studies have shown that 85% of those with diabetes experience fatigue. Some signs of fatigue include: Dizziness Irritability Headache Inability to concentrate Problems remembering things Blurry vision Slowed reflexes and muscle weakness Is feeling fatigue a sign/symptom of diabetes? Feeling fatigued is definitely a symptom of diabetes. However, fatigue can also be a sign or symptom of many other diseases, so it is important that you talk to your doctor about any problems that you are having. I advise reading the following: Reactive hypoglycemia, a term used to define the crash that a person gets after eating a lot of sugar and carbs, can be an early sign of diabetes. In order for the body to use the sugars and carbs that are consumed for fuel, each molecule must be paired with insulin to get into the cell. If there isn’t enough insulin available, then the sugar molecules stay in the bloodstream and cause high blood sugar. What happens is that over time, eating Continue reading >>

8 Clever Ways To Beat Diabetic Fatigue

8 Clever Ways To Beat Diabetic Fatigue

Feeling fatigued? For people with diabetes, tiredness can be one of the early symptoms. Still tired when waking up in the morning? Never feeling rested? Lets see how someone with diabetic fatigue can get back their energy 8 Simple tips for dealing with diabetic fatigue While these tips may be different, they all strive to achieve the same goal: Balancing blood sugar levels. When the balance is restored to the blood sugar levels, it helps to fight diabetic fatigue at its root cause. When trying to get blood sugar levels stable, Manna Blood Sugar Support is an excellent way to boost your efforts. But lets look at all the things you should do in combination with each other for the best results Move more, and you get more energy. People who take a brisk, daily 30-minute walk are less tired than idle people. Choose an activity you like, whether its Zumba, tennis, walking, gardening, or swimming. Do it for at least 30 to 60 minutes a day. If you cant spare that much time at once, sneak in shorter (10-minute) periods of exercise whenever you can. As long as it adds up to 30-60 minutes per day, thats what counts. Wear a pedometer so you know how many steps youre taking each day. Try to add 500 steps a day until you reach at least 10,000 daily steps. To keep your blood sugar level steady, eat three healthy meals and a snack during the day. Include healthy carbohydrates from fruits and vegetables and whole grains, as well as lean protein from sources such as beans, tofu, fish, or skinless chicken breasts. (See the Manna Diet in the free e-book) Avoid caffeine, especially late in the day. Caffeine can keep you awake and disrupt sleep. It can also make it harder to control your blood sugar if you overdo it. B vitamins help nerve health. If you have nerve problems from diabetes, ma Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the commonest and most disabling diabetes symptoms. Exhaustion can disrupt and interfere with all aspects of daily living. What causes diabetes fatigue, and why is it so common? First, diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. • High blood glucose makes your blood “sludgy,” slowing circulation so cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need. • Low sugars levels also cause fatigue, because when blood sugar is low, there is not enough fuel for the cells to work well. • In addition, high blood glucose can cause fatigue through inflammation. Blood vessels get inflamed by the sugar. When this happens, according to new research, immune cells called monocytes come into the brain, causing fatigue. Other medical conditions can also cause fatigue, like… • Anemia, or low red blood cell counts. • Low thyroid (“hypothyroidism”) — people with diabetes are more likely than others to have thyroid problems. If your thyroid level is low, you are likely to feel tired, sleepy, and depressed. • Low testosterone levels, especially in men. Men with diabetes are much more likely to have low testosterone. • Infections: People with diabetes often have infections they don’t know about. Infections take energy to fight, which can cause fatigue and raise blood sugar levels. A common source is urinary tract or “bladder” infections. They often hurt, but sometimes have no symptoms, except for the fatigue. • Undiagnosed heart disease: If you get tired after tasks that you used to sail through, it could be time to for a heart check-up. • Medication side effects: Many drugs for diabetes, blood pressure, depression, pain, and other issues can cause fatigue. Read labels, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Then there are Continue reading >>

Extreme Tiredness (fatigue)

Extreme Tiredness (fatigue)

Tweet In the medical world, extreme tiredness and exhaustion that doesn’t disappear with rest or sleep is known as fatigue and this can be a telling symptom of diabetes. Causes of fatigue There are many things that can cause you to fell fatigued. The most common and obvious is a lack of sleep. Most adults need between 6 and 8 hours of sleep a day, but this can vary quite a lot from person to person. It's also important to remember that most people require less sleep as they get older. Other common causes of fatigue include: Anaemia - a condition that occurs when you don't have enough red blood cells Cancer - most types of cancer cause fatigue to a certain degree Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - a condition that causes unexplained exhaustion and fatigue Depression - constant tiredness is a major indicator of depression or emotional stress Diabetes - sudden and extreme tiredness is one of the main symptoms of diabetes mellitus Infections - fatigue can be brought on by various infections such as the flu (influenza) Coeliac Disease - an autoimmune condition in which inflammation in the lining of the small intestine affects the body’s ability to absorb nutrients properly. Diabetes and fatigue With diabetes, fatigue is caused by a number of factors, including: High blood sugar levels, either from a lack of the insulin horomone or from insulin resistance, can affect the body’s ability to get glucose from the blood into cells to meet our energy needs People on stronger diabetes medication such as insulin, may also experience fatigue as a symptom of low blood glucose levels. Blood glucose testing can help to determine whether high or low sugar levels may be the cause of fatigue. Recognising fatigue Symptoms of fatigue include: A lack of, or no energy Difficulty in carrying out s Continue reading >>

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

No, it's not your imagination: Taking care of yourself when you have type 2 diabetes can be exhausting. Diabetes-related fatigue is common, and you may be feeling it from a variety of sources — your type 2 diabetes symptoms themselves, exhaustion from the responsibilities of managing diabetes daily, ineffective diabetes management, or even from other underlying conditions. Understanding Diabetes-Related Fatigue There are strong associations between diabetes and testosterone levels, kidney disease, and other health complications, all of which can cause you to become very tired, says Ronald Tamler, MD, medical director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. There’s also a link between diabetes and depression, he adds, and depression is a common cause of extreme fatigue. According to a study published in June 2014 in the journal Current Diabetes Report, depressive symptoms affect up to one-third of people with diabetes. The research also found that depression not only impairs quality of life but also adds to the difficulties experienced in diabetes self-management. "The research highlights a wide range of potential explanations for the association between diabetes and depression, which include having a sedentary lifestyle, eating a diet high in refined sugars, sleeping poorly, and experiencing brain dysfunction due to low and high blood sugars, as well as chronic inflammation that is associated with diabetes," says David Lam, MD, associate director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Other causes of fatigue from diabetes include cells being deprived of sugar, high blood sugar, dehydration from increased urination, loss of calories, and sleep apnea. Graham McMahon, bachelor of med Continue reading >>

Why Is My Diabetes Making Me So Tired?

Why Is My Diabetes Making Me So Tired?

Diabetes and fatigue are often discussed as a cause and effect. In fact, if you have diabetes, you’re more than likely going to experience fatigue at some point. However, there may be much more to this seemingly simple correlation. About 2.5 million people in the United States have chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). CFS is marked by ongoing fatigue that significantly disrupts everyday life. People with this type of extreme fatigue use up their energy sources without necessarily being active. Walking to your car, for example, can zap all your energy. It’s thought that CFS is related to inflammation that disrupts your muscle metabolites. Diabetes, which affects your blood sugar (glucose) and the production of insulin by the pancreas, can also have inflammatory markers. A wealth of studies have looked at the possible connections between diabetes and fatigue. It can be challenging to treat both diabetes and fatigue. However, there are numerous options that can help. You may first need to see your doctor to determine the exact cause of your fatigue. There are numerous studies connecting diabetes and fatigue. One such study looked at the results of a survey on sleep quality. Researchers reported that 31 percent of people with type 1 diabetes had poor sleep quality. The prevalence was slightly larger in adults who had type 2 diabetes, at 42 percent. According to another study from 2015, about 40 percent of people with type 1 diabetes have fatigue longer than six months. The authors also noted that the fatigue is often so severe that it impacts everyday tasks as well as quality of life. A 2013 study was conducted on 37 people with diabetes, as well as 33 without diabetes. This way, the researchers could look at differences in fatigue levels. The participants anonymously answer Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes— An Overview Of Current Understanding And Management Approaches

Fatigue In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes— An Overview Of Current Understanding And Management Approaches

Patients with type 2 diabetes commonly experience fatigue, which may be incapacitating and adversely affect self-care regimens.1–7 Fatigue is a perplexing problem for healthcare providers.8 Wessely suggests that because fatigue is a non-specific and universal symptom, chronic fatigue is challenging to diagnose and treat.9 Fatigue researchers do not have a standardized definition, measurement approach, or diagnostic criteria. Diabetes-related fatigue is assumed to correlate with alterations in glucose homeostasis, but few data support this hypothesis.3,7,10,11 Fatigue in type 2 diabetes is associated with higher body mass index (BMI),1,7,12 the presence of comorbid conditions,7,13 depression,7 physical inactivity,1,7,14 sleep disturbances,1,15,16 and elevated cytokines.3,10 Fritschi and Quinn recently provided a detailed review of the correlates of fatigue in diabetes, including conflicting findings regarding the relationship between fatigue and glycemic control.8 Type 2 diabetes is a disorder associated with chronic low-grade inflammation.17,18 Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, especially among obese patients, were linked to an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumour necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], interleukin-6 [IL-6]) from immune cells as well as increased acute phase reactants (e.g., C-reactive protein [CRP]). Pro-inflammatory cytokines and CRP were associated with high fatigue levels10,11,19,20 and depression and sleep disturbances in a variety of diseases.21–24 There is a considerable gap in the literature, however, about the treatment of fatigue secondary to type 2 diabetes. Anti-inflammatory therapies may ameliorate fatigue with type 2 diabetes. Thus, our disc Continue reading >>

Recovering From Diabetes Fatigue

Recovering From Diabetes Fatigue

Fatigue is so important. I was going to write a whole book about it, but I’m too tired. So what to do? Fortunately, it turns out there are many ways to overcome fatigue. That’s good news, because people with diabetes are often fatigued, and it’s disabling. As I discussed two weeks ago, blood sugar levels that are too high or too low will cause fatigue. Other diabetes-related causes are inflammation, lack of sleep, insulin resistance, infections, circulation problems, medication side effects, depression, and stress. Low thyroid and low testosterone levels also cause fatigue and are common in people with diabetes. So what to do depends partly on the causes. Still, many fatigued people would benefit from moving more. I know that sounds crazy. When you’re exhausted, who wants to exercise? But I’m not talking about vigorous training for a triathlon kind of exercise. I’m talking about treating yourself gently, and moving your body in ways that feel good. Studies show that gentle exercise reduces fatigue by up to 65%. Gentle exercise is actually more energizing than vigorous exercise, according to this University of Georgia study. It could be tai chi or qigong, water exercise, yoga, walking, or seated exercises, or anything else that feels good. I have a lake near me, where it’s fun to go watch the birds. Maybe you have a place like that to walk. Or a mall or something. Being completely sedentary makes you more tired. You get more out of shape, so it gets harder and harder to move. To feel better, you don’t even need formal exercise. Housework can be turned into a form of exercise just by concentrating on the movements as you do them, instead of stressing about how dirty everything is. Fatigue specialist Majid Ali, MD, says that exercise should be “slow, sust Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Diabetic Lethargy

How To Deal With Diabetic Lethargy

Bouts of sleepiness, especially after meals, are some of the most common and disabling symptoms of diabetes. However, there are many causes of lethargy, besides diabetes. So how do you know whether you have diabetic lethargy and, if you do have it, what can you do to combat it? Many diabetics feel, at times, extremely tired, fatigued or lethargic. Having periods when you feel so exhausted that you can only prevent yourself from falling asleep with great difficulty can seriously disrupt your daily life. This tiredness can be caused by blood glucose levels that are too high or too low. But it can also be due to a dozen or so other causes such as stress, overwork, lack of a good night’s sleep and so on. The glucose-insulin system Glucose, a simple sugar, is your body’s primary source of energy. In fact, your muscle cells need glucose all the time so you can talk, walk, run, read a book, think etc. When your food is being digested, glucose is released from your stomach into your bloodstream and carried to your muscle cells. At the same time, insulin, a hormone (type of chemical), is released into your bloodstream from your pancreas. Insulin is needed to enable the glucose to enter your muscle cells. To do this, the insulin attaches itself to receptors in the surface of the cells and causes the cell membranes to allow glucose to enter. The cells then use the glucose as fuel. Of course, if the receptors in your muscle cells are blocked by fat, the insulin will not be able to open them. This is the essential problem faced by type 2 diabetics and is the reason why the only way to beat your diabetes is to eat an extremely low-fat diet designed to unblock the cell receptors. Causes of diabetic lethargy Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Patients With Diabetes: A Review

Fatigue In Patients With Diabetes: A Review

Go to: Abstract Objective Fatigue is a common and distressing complaint among people with diabetes, and likely to hinder the ability to perform daily diabetes self-management tasks. A review of the literature about diabetes-related fatigue was conducted with an eye toward creating a framework for beginning to conduct more focused studies on this subject. A literature search containing the terms diabetes, fatigue, tiredness, and symptoms was conducted to search for literature that addressed diabetes-related fatigue. Diabetes presents many potential pathways for fatigue, but focused studies on this symptom are rare. Furthermore, research on diabetes-related fatigue is limited by fatigue's non-specific symptoms and because fatigue researchers have yet to agree on standardized definition, measurement or diagnostic criteria. Additionally, few diabetes randomized clinical trials included measurement of patient-reported outcomes, such as symptoms or health-related quality of life in their study designs, though one that did provided some the meaningful finding that symptom-focused education improved self-management practices, HbA1c levels, quality of life and symptom distress. Conclusion There is a need to standardized definition, measurement and diagnostic criteria of fatigue in diabetes. We present a model that can guide focused studies on fatigue in diabetes. The model capitalizes on the multidimensional phenomena (physiological, psychological, and lifestyle) associated with fatigue in diabetes. Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus, a major public health problem, affects approximately 6% of the world's adult population, and is increasing in epidemic proportions.1, 2 Among people with diabetes, fatigue is a pervasive and distressing complaint. Although fatigue also occurs in Continue reading >>

40% Of Type 1 Adults Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

40% Of Type 1 Adults Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Tiredness can seem like a chronic condition when managing Type 1 diabetes, but a new study finds Type 1s are prone to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, as well. A new study out of Holland suggests that people with Type 1 diabetes are much more likely to suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) than the average population, and it apparently has nothing to do with fluctuating glucose levels. The study, conducted by the Expert Center for Chronic Fatigue at Radboud University in Holland, found that 4 in 10 adult study participants with Type 1 diabetes suffered from CFS, compared with fewer than 1 in 10 in the control group of adults. The study results were published this August in Diabetes Care, a scientific journal of the American Diabetes Association. The researchers emphasized that CFS onset had nothing to do with glucose levels or bouts of hypoglycemia. Researchers had a subset of 66 participants with Type 1 diabetes wear a continuous glucose monitor, and those with fewer events of hypoglycemia actually were more likely to have symptoms of CFS. While the researchers found that depression and complications from diabetes made CFS more likely among the Type 1 population in the study, it’s difficult to draw many conclusions about the possible causes of CFS among people with diabetes. First recognized as a syndrome in 1994, CFS is still poorly understood, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CFS researchers are exploring everything from infection to stress as possible causes for the syndrome. Treatment is complex, as well, as doctors focus mainly on mitigating the symptoms of CFS in absence of a cure. According to the CDC, the fatigue of CFS is accompanied by at least 4 of 8 characteristic symptoms lasting at least 6 months. These symptoms incl Continue reading >>

Tired Of Your Diabetes? Here’s How To Keep Going

Tired Of Your Diabetes? Here’s How To Keep Going

When you have diabetes, your daily to-do list can seem like a lot. You track your blood sugar, take medicine, watch your diet, and exercise. It can make you feel overwhelmed and burned out. If you’re there: 1. Know that no one is perfect. There are no vacations from diabetes. Even the most diligent people can’t keep their blood sugar or diet or physical activity on target all the time. “Diabetes is unique because [you’re] actually making medical decisions, day-to-day, minute-to-minute,” says Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, a clinical health psychologist. This can be stressful, says David Nathan, MD, director of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital. “If people are always stressed out about diabetes, they’re miserable,” Nathan says. He says people need to forgive themselves if they miss their goals for a day, a week, or even more. “Chill a little bit,” Nathan says. “We’re going to do the best we can. We need to recognize no one is perfect.” 2. Pay attention to what stresses you out. Living with diabetes can cause fear, anger, worry, and sadness. Lawrence Fisher, PhD, director of the Behavioral Diabetes Research Group at UCSF School of Medicine, has studied what doctors call “diabetes distress” in people with type 1 and those with type 2diabetes. He learned that during any 18-month period, from a third to a half of people with diabetes will feel a good bit of it. He cites seven common sources of diabetes distress among people with type 1 diabetes. The most common is a feeling of helplessness. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety i Continue reading >>

Chronic Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent But Not Explained By Hyperglycemia Or Glucose Variability

Chronic Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent But Not Explained By Hyperglycemia Or Glucose Variability

OBJECTIVE Fatigue is a classical symptom of hyperglycemia, but the relationship between chronic fatigue and diabetes has not been systematically studied. We investigated prevalence, impact, and potential determinants of chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Out of 324 randomly selected T1DM outpatients, 214 participated in this cross-sectional observational study. Participants were compared with age- and sex-matched population-based controls. Chronic fatigue, functional impairments, current health status, comorbidity, diabetes-related factors, and fatigue-related cognitions and behaviors were assessed with questionnaires, and HbA1c values and comorbidity were assessed with medical records. Sixty-six patients underwent continuous glucose monitoring combined with an electronic fatigue diary for 5 days. Acute fatigue and four glucose parameters were determined: mean, variability, and relative time spent in hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. RESULTS T1DM patients were significantly more often chronically fatigued (40%; 95% CI 34–47%) compared with matched controls (7%; 95% CI 3–10%; P < 0.001). Chronically fatigued patients had significantly more functional impairments. Fatigue was the most troublesome symptom. Age, depression, pain, sleeping problems, low self-efficacy concerning fatigue, and physical inactivity were significantly associated with chronic fatigue. Chronically fatigued patients spent slightly less time in hypoglycemia (proportion 0.07 ± 0.06 vs. 0.12 ± 0.10; P = 0.025). Glucose parameters were not related to acute fatigue. CONCLUSIONS Chronic fatigue is highly prevalent and clinically relevant in T1DM. Its significant relationship with cognitive behavioral variables and weak association with blood gl Continue reading >>

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