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How Do You Reduce Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Diabetes?

Focus on prevention There are four million people with diabetes in the UK – that's one in every 16 people. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is less common and is not preventable. Type 2 is predominantly associated with weight gain and a sedentary lifestyle, but there are other risk factors. In the UK, 90% of diabetics are type 2. If your blood sugars are abnormally high, but are not in the diabetic range, you may be diagnosed as prediabetic. This means you have a high risk of developing diabetes. The good news is that around 80% of cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable. Find out what you can do to reduce the likelihood of developing the condition. Are you at risk? Type 2 diabetes can come on slowly and the signs may not be obvious, so it is important to understand the risk factors. Do you have a large waist? (A large waist is classified as more than 80cm/31.5in in women, 94cm/37in in men or 90cm/35in in South Asian men. Measure your waist around your belly button – do not go by trouser size, which is misleading.) Do you suffer from mental health problems, including bipolar illness, depression or stress? Oops! We're sorry, something went wrong with the quiz. Please try again. People with type 2 diabetes who have not yet been diagnosed can display symptoms such as extreme thirst, tiredness and needing to go to the toilet more often, but you could also be symptom free and still have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes. Eating well to beat diabetes If you are overweight or have a large waist, type 2 diabetes can be avoided or delayed by reducing your weight and waist size. Along with increased activity, a healthy diet will help you manage your weight. But what exactly is a 'healthy' diet? Every kilogram lost is associated with a 16% reductio Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes From Becoming Diabetes

5 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes From Becoming Diabetes

Prediabetes, or elevated blood sugar, puts you at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, especially if you are overweight, but you can take steps to prevent it. Type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. More than 86 million American adults—approximately one-third of those over age 18 and half of those over 65—have prediabetes, and most of them don’t even know it. If you have prediabetes, it means your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes puts you at higher-than-normal risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control, up to 30% of overweight men and women with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years of diagnosis. You don’t have to be one of them! Here are five steps you can take to reduce your diabetes risk. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

3 Easy Tips To Lower Blood Sugar Fast

3 Easy Tips To Lower Blood Sugar Fast

Jeanette Terry was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 11 years old, and she has since lived with diabetes through difficult life transitions, including the teenage years, college, and having children. She addresses the day-to-day struggles of living with diabetes—going beyond medical advice—to improve overall adherence and management. Extremely high blood sugar levels can be dangerous, and they can cause lasting health complications. Remember: if you ever have blood sugar readings that remain high for more than 24 hours without coming down (and after an effort has been made to lower them), you need to be addressed by a doctor. That being said, we've all had those days when we get a random high blood sugar reading and we are not sure what caused it…or we forget to give insulin, or we eat a delicious dessert without realizing how much sugar is actually in it. For whatever reason, those out of the ordinary high blood sugar readings happen and need to be treated. No need to rush to the doctor for every high blood sugar reading though. There are some simple steps you can take to lower blood sugar fast. Watch for signs of high blood sugar You know the feeling: extreme thirst, sluggishness, nausea, blurred vision, a downright sick feeling. And your family or friends may tell you that extreme irritability is a major sign you need to check your blood sugar to see if it is high. The best thing to do is to catch it before it gets really high, or it will be harder to bring down quickly, causing havoc on your blood sugar readings for days. If you do not take insulin as a part of your treatment plan, these tips will show you how to lower your blood sugar fast. If you take insulin, you will first want to give the appropriate amount of insulin to correct the blood sugar. Continue reading >>

4 Ways You Can Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Naturally

4 Ways You Can Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Naturally

Finding out you have type 2 diabetes can be life altering, not to mention frightening. But it’s not a death sentence. Through a variety of approaches and lifestyle changes, you can reverse type 2 diabetes naturally. When your blood glucose levels rise above normal Diabetes is spreading at an alarming rate, with one in three Americans born after 2000 developing diabetes in their lifetime. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has termed the rapid rise of cases as epidemic. As of 2016, more than 29 million Americans are living with diabetes. And, according to the CDC, 86 million are living with type 2 diabetes — the most common form. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly, which is called insulin resistance. Initially, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it’s not able to keep up. It can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. While many people do not feel any symptoms with type 2 diabetes, common symptoms do exist. Being able to recognize these symptoms is important. Most symptoms of type 2 diabetes occur when blood sugar levels are abnormally high. They may include: Extreme thirst Elevated glucose levels force fluids from the cells, thus increasing the amount of fluid delivered to the kidneys. Frequent or increased urination Because your tissues are dehydrated, you become thirsty. The more you urinate the thirstier you get. Alternately, the more you drink, the more you urinate. Extreme hunger With type 2 diabetes, the body’s insulin resistance keeps glucose from entering the muscles and providing energy. So, the muscles and other tissues send a hunger message to up your energy. Excess fatigue Glucose is one of the body’s main sources of energy. But when cel Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Diabetes

How To Prevent Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? If you have diabetes, your blood sugar levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, this happens because your body does not make enough insulin, or it does not use insulin well (this is called insulin resistance). If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you might be able to prevent or delay developing it. Who is at risk for type 2 diabetes? Many Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes. Your chances of getting it depend on a combination of risk factors such as your genes and lifestyle. The risk factors include Having prediabetes, which means you have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes Being age 45 or older A family history of diabetes Being African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander Having given birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more Having acanthosis nigricans, a skin condition in which your skin becomes dark and thick, especially around your neck or armpits Smoking How can I prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes? If you are at risk for diabetes, you may be able to prevent or delay getting it. Most of the things that you need to do involve having a healthier lifestyle. So if you make these changes, you will get other health benefits as well. You may lower your risk of other diseases, and you will probably feel better and have more energy. The changes are Losing weight and keeping it off. Weight control is an important part of diabetes prevention. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose between 10 to 20 pounds. And once you lose the weight, it is important that you don't gain it back. Following Continue reading >>

Exactly What To Eat To Reduce Your Diabetes Symptoms

Exactly What To Eat To Reduce Your Diabetes Symptoms

Ever since Jennifer Ross was diagnosed with diabetes, she's had to avoid the temptation of Halloween candy, melt-in-your-mouth Krispy Kreme doughnuts, and even orange juice. But the Manhattan native has discovered she feels best when she doesn't indulge in carby, sugary junk—and focuses instead on protein-rich foods such as hard-boiled eggs for breakfast, sushi for lunch, and meatballs for dinner. "When I eat more protein, my blood sugar stays balanced and I don't get headaches while I'm sitting in a meeting," says Ross, 29, cofounder of Be-Mixed, a zero-calorie, zero-sugar cocktail mixer. A recent study suggests that Ross's personal strategy is actually smart science. The research, presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, shows that a high-protein diet improves blood sugar control and decreases liver fat in people with type 2 diabetes, without harming the kidneys. And it doesn't seem to matter whether the protein comes from plant or animal sources, as long as it makes up 30% of your diet (the USDA recommends 10 to 35%). In the study, conducted at the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Berlin, men and women were divided into two groups eating protein-rich diets: One ate animal-based protein from meat and dairy, and the other ate plant-based protein from sources such as lentils and chickpeas. Both groups got the rest of their nutrition from 40% carbohydrates and 30% dietary fat (the same ratios as in the Zone Diet). After 6 weeks, all participants had improved glucose metabolism and reduced liver fat, but the animal-protein group also showed better insulin sensitivity, and the plant-protein group showed better kidney function. (Find out what a perfect day of eating enough protein looks like.) gettyimages-516366457-pistachio-brian-yarvin.jpg Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar And Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes

Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar And Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes

A second study in a 2013 edition of the journal Obesity analyzed the impact of weight loss among obese subjects with metabolic abnormalities. Results showed that those who lost 5 percent of their body weight experienced significant improvements in fasting blood sugar levels compared to those who did not lose weight. Lower your own blood sugar levels by committing to a weight loss plan. By reducing your calorie intake and adding regular exercise to your routine, you can drop enough weight to protect yourself from diabetes. Cut out Sugary Drinks Sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda, iced tea, and sports drinks, can increase your risk of diabetes. Those who drink one to two sugar sweetened beverages per day are 26 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those who consume less than one such beverage per month, according to a 2010 study in Diabetes Care. In addition, a 2013 study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that those who increased their consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during a six-year period were 1.6 times more likely to develop elevated fasting blood sugar levels. Reducing your intake of these sugary beverages can lower your risk of diabetes. According to a 2013 study in the journal PLoS ONE, a 10-20 percent reduction in the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages would reduce new cases of diabetes. Specifically, replacing sugary beverages with water can have a beneficial impact on your health. A 2007 study in Obesity found that those who replaced sugary beverages with water cut their daily energy intake by 200 calories. This reduction could help with weight loss and therefore reduce your diabetes risk. Increase Your Fiber Intake Adding fiber to your diet can reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. A 2014 study in the European Journal of Epidemiolo Continue reading >>

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

Can controlling your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications be as simple as eating the right foods? Yes. Certain foods are packed with nutrients that stabilize blood sugar levels, protect your heart, and even save your vision from the damaging effects of diabetes. These 12 foods can give you an extra edge against diabetes and its complications. 1. Apples In a Finnish study, men who ate the most apples and other foods high in quercetin had 20 percent less diabetes and heart disease deaths. Other good sources of quercetin are onions, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, and berries. 2. Cinnamon A study at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, found that if you use ½ teaspoon of cinnamon daily, it can make cells more sensitive to insulin. Therefore, the study says, the cells convert blood sugar to energy. After 40 days of taking various amount of cinnamon extract, diabetics experienced not only lower blood sugar spikes after eating, but major improvements in signs of heart health. And you can sprinkle cinnamon on just about anything. 3. Citrus Fruit Studies show that people with diabetes tend to have lower levels of vitamin C in their bodies, so antioxidant-packed citrus fruit is a great snack choice. It may seem quicker to get your C from a pill, but since fruit is low in fat, high in fiber, and delivers lots of other healthy nutrients, it's a better choice. 4. Cold-Water Fish Heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as it does people without the illness, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids—the "good fat" in cold-water fish such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and Atlantic mackerel—can help lower artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while raising levels of HDL Continue reading >>

How To Reduce Blood Sugar In Pregnancy

How To Reduce Blood Sugar In Pregnancy

High blood sugar during pregnancy is referred to as gestational diabetes. This condition affects 3 to 5 percent of American pregnant woman and is associated with hormonal changes that occur in the body during pregnancy, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Being overweight before pregnancy, a family history of diabetes, a history of large or stillborn babies, and being older than 25 years are risk factors for gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels usually return to normal after giving birth, and proper management of gestational diabetes helps prevent complications in both mom and baby during the pregnancy. Video of the Day Develop a meal plan. With the guidance of your obstetrician or a registered dietitian, devise a diet that is specific to you and your pregnancy. Although general guidelines for reducing blood sugar in pregnancy are typically the same, your doctor will take into consideration your overall health, your age and any other health conditions you have. Limit your intake of sugary snacks, drinks and foods. Candy, soda, cookies, cake and other foods that contain a lot of simple sugar can rapidly increase blood sugar levels and make gestational diabetes worse. Eat three or four small meals everyday with snacks in between. Eating more often prevents your blood sugar from crashing between meals. Reduce the amount of carbohydrates in your diet and replace them with high-fiber foods, such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Drink a minimum of 64 oz. of fluid each day. Proper hydration is necessary to stabilize blood sugar levels and prevent pregnancy complications. Engage in regular, light activity, with your doctor's permission. Activities such as walking and swimming can help keep blood sugar levels under control. Getting exercise during pregnancy also helps Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

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