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How Do You Protect Yourself From Diabetes?

Diabetes Diet Tips - Foods That Lower Your Diabetes Risk

Diabetes Diet Tips - Foods That Lower Your Diabetes Risk

Whether you're a Pink Lady or a Granny Smith fan, just one apple delivers five grams of fiber (that's 20% of your daily value), plus plenty of immune-boosting vitamin C. Fiber plays a major role in diabetes prevention since it helps regulate blood sugar. Plus, while all diets high in fruits and veggies are linked with decreasing risk of diabetes and other chronic diseases, apples have been linked specifically to lowering diabetes risk . Give kale a break and introduce yourself to new leafy greens. Swiss chard is an especially exciting up-and-comer because it delivers some serious nutritional benefits without spiking blood sugar. It's low-cal and full of filling fiber, calcium, powerful antioxidants, and B vitamins. Even better it's super easy to add to salads and sauts , and its rainbow color can make even the dullest plate look more appealing. Greek yogurt is full of calcium and many are fortified with vitamin D, which have both been linked to lowering the risk of diabetes . It also merits an A+ for its high protein content a nutritional powerhouse for weight management. (Since being overweight can increase the chances of getting diabetes, weight control is key to reducing your risk.) Bonus: Add vitamin C-rich fruit like blueberries for double the diabetes-fighting power. The pigment found in eggplant skin comes from anthocyanins, important antioxidant compounds that have been associated with reduced risk of diabetes . Antioxidants protect cells from damage, including pancreatic beta cells (the cells responsible for secreting insulin in your body). They also reduce the stress and damage on your peripheral tissues tissues that have the potential to be exposed to bacteria caused by chronic high-blood sugar. Try adding eggplant to dips and sauces . They also boost the fi Continue reading >>

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Reduce Portion Sizes Portion size is the amount of food you eat, such as 1 cup of fruit or 6 ounces of meat. If you are trying to eat smaller portions, eat a half of a bagel instead of a whole bagel or have a 3-ounce hamburger instead of a 6-ounce hamburger. Three ounces is about the size of your fist or a deck of cards. Put less on your plate, Nate. 1. Drink a large glass of water 10 minutes before your meal so you feel less hungry. 2. Keep meat, chicken, turkey, and fish portions to about 3 ounces. 3. Share one dessert. Eat a small meal, Lucille. 4. Use teaspoons, salad forks, or child-size forks, spoons, and knives to help you take smaller bites and eat less. 5. Make less food look like more by serving your meal on a salad or breakfast plate. 6. Eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to send a signal to your brain that you are full. 7. Listen to music while you eat instead of watching TV (people tend to eat more while watching TV). How much should I eat? Try filling your plate like this: 1/4 protein 1/4 grains 1/2 vegetables and fruit dairy (low-fat or skim milk) Move More Each Day Find ways to be more active each day. Try to be active for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Walking is a great way to get started and you can do it almost anywhere at any time. Bike riding, swimming, and dancing are also good ways to move more. If you are looking for a safe place to be active, contact your local parks department or health department to ask about walking maps, community centers, and nearby parks. Dance it away, Faye. 8. Show your kids the dances you used to do when you were their age. 9. Turn up the music and jam while doing household chores. 10. Work out with a video that shows you how to get active. Let's go, Flo. 11. Deliver a message in person to a co-worke Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

You can help reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes by understanding your risk and making changes to your lifestyle. Common risk factors include increased weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride (blood fat) levels. Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Here are some tips to help you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. Check your risk of diabetes. Take the Life! risk assessment test and learn more about your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A 12+ score indicates that you are at high risk and may be eligible for the Life! program - a free Victorian lifestyle modification program that helps you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or call 13 RISK (13 7475). Manage your weight. Excess body fat, particularly if stored around the abdomen, can increase the body’s resistance to the hormone insulin. This can lead to type 2 diabetes. Exercise regularly. Moderate physical activity on most days of the week helps manage weight, reduce blood glucose levels and may also improve blood pressure and cholesterol. Eat a balanced, healthy diet. Reduce the amount of fat in your diet, especially saturated and trans fats. Eat more fruit, vegetables and high-fibre foods. Cut back on salt. Limit takeaway and processed foods. ‘Convenience meals’ are usually high in salt, fat and kilojoules. It’s best to cook for yourself using fresh ingredients whenever possible. Limit your alcohol intake. Too much alcohol can lead to weight gain and may increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should have no more than two standard drinks a day and women should have no more than one. Quit smoking. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers. Control your blood pressure. Most people can do th Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Around three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. However you’ve found out you’re at risk – and knowing is a big first step – the important thing to do now is take action to lower your risk. Evidence shows the best way to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes is by: eating better moving more reducing your weight if you’re overweight Where do I start? The key is to find what works for you, fits in with your day and you enjoy. 1. Set clear goals Setting goals can help you break down what you need to do and how to do it. Use our Action Plan (PDF, 66KB)to set healthy goals and keep aFood and activity diary (PDF, 40KB)to keep you on track. 2. Plan ahead It’s helpful to plan meals for the week ahead especially when we all lead busy lives. This can help you reach your goal to eat better and stick to a budget. 3. Start to make healthy changes Time to put your plan into action. Each healthy choice you make is helping you to achieve your goal. If you find it hard, don’t give up – start again tomorrow. 4. Be creative Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring. Take the opportunity to try new recipes and new food. 5. Sleep well Get a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that if you are tired you feel hungrier and are more likely to want fatty and sugary foods. This can make it harder to stick to your goals. What changes can I make to eat better? Eating better doesn’t have to mean boring or tasteless. We've got plenty of tools, tips and recipes to help you eat healthier. We've got healthier versions of your favourite recipes, or follow our videos and learn to cook a new recipe. How can I move more every day? Getting active and staying active will reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, and you’ll feel great too. If you're not sur Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Protect Yourself Against Diabetes: A Minority Health Month Alert

7 Ways To Protect Yourself Against Diabetes: A Minority Health Month Alert

7 Ways to Protect Yourself against Diabetes: A Minority Health Month Alert Published on Apr 29, 2015 | Men's Health , Stay Well , Women's Health | 0 comments Diabetes remains one of the most serious health issues among minority communities. While the nation highlights major health concerns that disproportionately affect minority communities during Aprils National Minority Health Month, Erlanger wants to focus on changing that disparity year-round. Before she passed away at the age of 84, Mary Ida Vandross endured devastating pain that many people cant imagine: the deaths of all four of her children, her grandson, and, decades prior, her husband. All six deaths were caused by complications of the same killer: diabetes. If Marys name sounds familiar, thats because her son was legendary R&B singer Luther Vandross, who died from complications of a diabetic stroke in 2005. He was 54 years old. I believe that had I known more about diabetes, I could have been more helpful to my family, Mary once said. Take care of yourselfthats all Im asking. Erlanger is trying to spread the word about how individuals can take care of themselves by offering free classes on diabetes prevention and maintenance at both Erlanger Community Health Centers. But before we look at how to fight the disease, we need to know what diabetes is. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce any or enough of the hormone insulin, resulting in high blood sugar, or glucose, which is a critical source of energy for cells. The most common type of diabetes, accounting for 90% of all cases, is type 2 diabetes, which is preventable and means that the body produces insulin but reacts poorly to it. The earlier diabetes is treated, the better your chances are of avoiding the consequences of the diseasesuch Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

12 Ways To Avoid Diabetes

12 Ways To Avoid Diabetes

Nearly 25 percent of Americans are thought to have prediabetes -- a condition of slightly elevated blood sugar levels that often develops into diabetes within 10 years -- but only 4 percent of people know it. What's worse, of those who are aware, less than half really tried to reduce their risk by losing weight, eating less, and exercising more. These are just a few of the good-for-you habits that can reverse prediabetes and ensure you never get the real thing, which can mean a lifetime of drugs and blood sugar monitoring, an increased risk of heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other scary health threats. Read on for 12 simple tricks everyone can start today. More from Prevention: 12 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Shedding even 10 pounds can significantly slash your risk. Even extremely overweight people were 70 percent less likely to develop diabetes when they lost just 5 percent of their weight -- even if they didn't exercise. If you weigh 175 pounds, that's a little less than 9 pounds! Use our calorie calculator to see how many calories you consume -- and how many you need to shave off your diet -- if you want to lose a little. 12 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Eating greens with a vinaigrette before a starchy entrée may help control your blood sugar levels. In an Arizona State University study, people with type 2 diabetes or a precursor condition called insulin resistance had lower blood sugar levels if they consumed about 2 tablespoons of vinegar just before a high-carb meal. "Vinegar contains acetic acid, which may inactivate certain starch-digesting enzymes, slowing carbohydrate digestion," said lead researcher Carol Johnston. In fact, vinegar's effects may be similar to those of the blood sugar -- lowering medication acarbose (Precose). Before you eat that fettuccine, enj Continue reading >>

Protect Against Diabetes What You Need To Know

Protect Against Diabetes What You Need To Know

It is believed that around 4.5 million people in the UK have been diagnosed with diabetes and an additional 1.1 million are unknowingly living with undiagnosed cases of diabetes. Out of this number of cases, an estimated 9 out of 10 people have type 2 diabetes- the preventable form of the disease. Although some of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes are unavoidable and cannot be changed (such as age, ethnicity and family history) there are plenty of small, simple steps that all of us can take to help protect against diabetes. Although the exact cause of diabetes is still unknown, the contributing factors to the condition are understood which means that you can take significant steps towards protecting yourself. All it takes is to make some simple changes to your lifestyle to lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Of course we all know that increasing physical activity levels can lead to weight loss, improved mood and overall fitness. But did you know exercise can protect against diabetes too? Research shows that taking regular exercise can reduce the risk of developing diabetes by up to 64% . It is suggested that all adults do two forms of physical exercise each week strength and aerobic. The amount you do will be personal to you and you must take into consideration your age, exercise experience, weight and any existing health conditions. The NHS LiveWell Guide can help you to get an idea of what level of exercise suits you and you can also speak to your GP for further advice. It goes without saying that shedding excess weight can greatly protect against diabetes. 80% of people who have the condition are overweight , so if you are in this category and are concerned about getting diabetes, you should work towards losing weight. The NHS has a handy 12 week weight loss pack Continue reading >>

The Health Mistake Fit Women Make

The Health Mistake Fit Women Make

Lower Your Diabetes Risk Do you go to the gym after sitting at your desk all day? Run or bike outside regularly? Are you watching your weight? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may be at risk for type 2 diabetes. What the...? Turns out that the disease is a hidden threat to otherwise healthy women. "Even those who are slim and physically fit may be at risk," says Leonid Poretsky, MD, director of the Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. That's something many people, and even some doctors, are not aware of. In fact, the majority of us don't really understand what diabetes is and the havoc it can cause. So here's the deal: Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin, a hormone that helps cells convert both sugars and starches (aka glucose) into energy, and doesn't respond properly to the insulin it does make. Glucose then builds up in the blood, which can lead to a host of complications, including heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. Even scarier is that nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, and almost 6 million of them are undiagnosed, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The incidence is expected to rise significantly: Some experts estimate that the number of Americans with type 2 diabetes will double in the next 25 years. "Diabetes is an epidemic," Dr. Poretsky says. Fortunately, you can help protect yourself. We're not talking about difficult, time-consuming lifestyle changes, but simple, everyday tweaks to your routine that can help reduce your risk of the disease and boost your overall health. Make these nine smart moves today. Keeping up with the kids—a reality TV show no one would watch! How to do it IRL provided by Emergen-C 9 Ways Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes: 21 Little Healthy Habits To Start

Prevent Diabetes: 21 Little Healthy Habits To Start

iStock/Floortje Dairy haters, listen up: Women who ate the most low-fat dairy products had a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a recent study of more than 82,000 women published in the Journal of Nutrition. Researchers think that certain milk proteins increase insulin secretion. Interaction among nutrients such as vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium may also lower the risk of diabetes. Another factor: If you're filling up on dairy, you may be less likely to eat other foods, such as sweetened beverages or snacks, which can raise diabetes risk. (Could you have diabetes? Don't miss these surprising diabetes symptoms.) Use the news: Swap your usual bagel or muffin breakfast for yogurt (mix in berries and nuts for a filling, nutritious parfait), enjoy a glass of skim milk with fruit for dessert, and snack on a low-fat string cheese with a couple of whole-grain crackers to quench pre-dinner cravings. iStock/zeljkosantrac New research confirms that a produce-rich diet can reduce your diabetes risk, according to a British study from the Institute of Metabolic Science in Cambridge. After researchers studied the eating habits of more than 3,700 adults ages 40 through 79, then followed them for 11 years, they discovered that adults with the highest fruit and vegetable intake (about six servings daily) had a 21 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who ate the least (about two servings a day). Variety mattered: People who consumed 16 different kinds of produce a week were 40 percent less likely to develop diabetes than those who ate just eight different types. Here's how eating a high-fiber diet helps diabetes. Use the news: Have at least one fruit or veggie at every meal or snack, and change things up from day to day and week to week. Challenge yours Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

en espaolEs posible prevenir la diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , a sugar that is the body's main source of fuel. Your body needs glucose to keep running. Here's how it should work. Glucose from the food gets into your bloodstream. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin . Insulin helps the glucose get into the body's cells. The pancreas is a long, flat gland in your belly that helps your body digest food. It also makes insulin. Insulin is kind of like a key that opens the doors to the cells of the body. It lets the glucose in. Then the glucose can move out of the blood and into the cells. But if someone has diabetes, the body either can't make insulin (this is called type 1 diabetes ) or the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should (this is called type 2 diabetes ). The glucose can't get into the cells normally, so the blood sugar level gets too high. Lots of sugar in the blood makes people sick if they don't get treatment. Type 1 diabetes can't be prevented. Doctors can't even tell who will get it and who won't. In type 1 diabetes, a person's immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. No one knows for sure why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes . Genes are like instructions for how the body should look and work that are passed on by parents to their kids. But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. In most cases, something else has to happen like getting a virus infection for a person to get type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes isn't contagious, so you can't catch it from another person or pass it along to your friends. And stuff like eating too much sugar doesn't cause type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is different. Sometimes, type 2 di Continue reading >>

How To Protect Yourself Against Diabetes

How To Protect Yourself Against Diabetes

Edit Article You can take steps to prevent some causes of diabetes by simple adjustments in your good, healthy, better, and your best choices of diet, exercise and lifestyle, following the steps and tips for better health. Diabetes - blood glucose (sugar) tends to be, or is, too high and is of two types: Type 1 Diabetes - the inability of your pancreas to produce enough insulin, if any at all -- necessary for staying alive -- and so, Type 1 requires injections of insulin -- because pills are inadequate, destroyed by your stomach digestion. Type 2 Diabetes - your body cells cannot properly use insulin. Some causes of diabetes: (1) you can never cure Type 1 -- (2) you can control either type, and might cure Type 2! 1 2 Put off the causes that you "cannot" prevent, instead of aggravating them -- making proper, healthy choices. Push back diabetes by sustaining a low carbohydrate diet, and even cure Type 2 by weight loss, diet and exercise; hopefully it is not too late: Heredity - Genes pass from one generation to another. If a mother has diabetics then there is 2 to 3% greater chance for her child -- but if the father is diabetic, the risk is more than the previous case. If both parents have diabetes, the child has much higher risk for diabetes. Age - Increasing age is a contributing factor; although this disease may occur at any age, but 80% of cases occur after 49 year years of age. Age decreases all systems from functioning as well as when younger. 3 Prevent the causes you "can" control: Obesity - Most sedentary life diseases are caused by obesity, including diabetes and high blood pressure over the years. Stress - Stresses of physical injury, disease and of emotional disturbance are frequently blamed as contributing causes of the disease: High blood pressure - Gradual d Continue reading >>

Protect Yourself From Diabetes

Protect Yourself From Diabetes

By Dietitian, Juliette Kellow BSc RD This month, a new study published online by the British Medical Journal reveals that making a few simple changes to your lifestyle is at least as effective as taking prescribed medicine to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Scientists from the University of Leicester trawled through 17 previously published trials to look at the effect different treatment programmes had on impaired glucose tolerance, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. They found that interventions to help reduce obesity (a major risk factor for diabetes) and increase activity worked just as well as treating impaired glucose tolerance with medication. WLR says: This review is encouraging and highlights just how important it is to modify and change our lifestyles if we want to prevent illness in later life. Better still, changing our diets, losing weight and taking more exercise all come with fewer side effects than prescribed medicines. Being overweight or obese is one of the biggest risk factors for diabetes. To reduce your risk, it’s essential to lose weight. According to Diabetes UK, a BMI of just 26 increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 16, while a BMI of 33 means you are a massive 77 times more likely to get diabetes than someone whose weight is in the normal weight range. Read how Weight Loss Resources' member, Jules reversed his diabetes For anyone who already has diabetes and needs to shift a few pounds – or simply wants to lower their risk of getting diabetes – you might want to take a look at The Diabetes Weight Loss Diet (Kyle Cathie Ltd, £12.99) written by celebrity chef Antony Worrall Thompson, registered dietitian Azmina Govindji and food writer Jane Suthering. It’s packed with useful advice and plenty of delicious recipes to try Continue reading >>

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