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How Do You Prevent Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

The Secret Thing That Stops You From Getting Into Ketosis

The Secret Thing That Stops You From Getting Into Ketosis

Keto adaptation is a difficult process and takes a long period of time. How to do it? No carbs, just meat, right? If it only were that simple. There’s a lot more that needs to be considered. Especially this one secret thing that stops you from getting into ketosis. What Causes Ketosis Once you start eating low carb (less than 50 grams NET a day), your body’s glycogen reserves will deplete themselves. A dreadful situation to be in, but only at first. Captain Liver flies to the rescue and starts producing ketone bodies that will be used to feed the brain and fuel the muscles. Ketones get created from fatty acids, either from the adipose tissue or dietary fat intake. After a while, the body’s enzymes will have completely shifted from using glucose to preferring ketones and fat for fuel. In a nutshell: your sugar body’s sugar concentration decreases and in response you become a fat burning beast. Am I in Ketosis? How to know if you are in ketosis in the first place? Ketosis is characterized by serum blood concentrations of ketone bodies above 0.5 mMol. In conjunction with low and stable blood sugar levels. Optimal measurements are between 0,5 and 3,0 mMol. You shouldn’t use urine strips, because they only indicate that you’re not utilizing ketones and are simply pissing them out. What Stops You from Keto Adapting It’s more than eating low carb and requires quite a decent amount of meticulousness. At least during the initial period. In my own experience, I remember struggling with reaching the optimal zone. But dialing down some of these variables, I was able to become fat adapted. Most common causes that stop you from keto adapting: Too many carbs (read how many you need to stay in ketosis) Too much protein Not being patient These are the first things that nee Continue reading >>

Keto Headache? Heres Why You Have It & How To Prevent It

Keto Headache? Heres Why You Have It & How To Prevent It

Keto Headache? Heres Why You Have It & How to Prevent It One of the most common complaints about transitioning into a low carbohydrate, high fat ketogenic diet is the dreaded low carb or keto headache. Unfortunately, this initial side effect prevents a large amount of dieters from experiencing the powerful benefits to this way of eating. But the flu-like side effects in the beginning of your ketogenic journey should not discourage you. There are specific lifestyle hacks and nutrient protocols you can take to prevent low-carb induced headaches. Eventually your body will adapt to using fats as energy and the symptoms will disappear. Lets dive into the reasons why you are experiencing a keto headache and the steps you can take to prevent it. What Happens to Your Body When You First Go Keto? Theres a good chance youve spent a good portion of your life feeding your body large amounts of carbohydrates, many of them from processed sources. This means your cells, hormones, and brain have adapted to using carbohydrates as its main source of energy for the body. Transitioning to a fat dominant fuel source will confuse your bodys metabolism in the beginning. This metabolic confusion will put your body through an induction phase. This is the time when your metabolism works in overtime to become accustomed to using ketones for energy ( from fats ) rather than glucose (from carbohydrates). During this phase, you may experience flu-like symptoms which is called the keto flu especially headaches and brain fog because your body is going through a physical withdrawal from carbohydrates. Mental Fog is Normal at the Start of Keto One of the very first signs of this induction phase comes from your brain losing its main source of fuel, glucose. If you have never followed a low carb high fat Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ultra-low carb diets have grown in popularity over recent years. These so-called “keto diets” aim to facilitate rapid weight loss, through the consumption of minimal carbohydrates. Keto diets have become understandably popular on account of their rapid results, together with the practical benefits of consuming healthy volumes of the right foods, making hunger less of a problem than on more typical calorie-controlled diets. However keto diets are not without their issues, and one of the most common complaints comes in the form of “ketosis breath”. Quite simply many individuals making use of very low carb diets suffer from pungent and unpleasant breath. The question is what can be done to counteract such a problem? The Cause of Ketosis Breath In order to learn how to get rid of keto breath, we first need to understand why breath can smell under such a regime. As it turns out there are two potential reasons(1), both of which can operate independently, or in conjunction. Ketone Release The most typical source of energy used by the body is glucose. This is typically derived from carbohydrates, where the digestive system breaks down complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. On very low carb diets, however, the body is unable to utilize such a fuel. Instead, the liver utilizes the fat present in the body as an energy source, producing “ketones” in the process(2). This is known as “ketosis” – and is the process from where keto diets get their unusual name. These ketone bodies come in three common forms; acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone(3). In large quantities they are removed from the body in the urine or through exhalation. Ketones can have quite a characteristic smell; they often make the dieter’s breath smell quite sweet and fruity, quit Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should I Eat To Prevent Ketosis?

How Many Carbs Should I Eat To Prevent Ketosis?

When you’re on a low-carb diet, your body kicks into action, breaking down fats into ketone bodies to use for energy. This increase in ketones -- called ketosis -- is a normal adaptation to cutting carbs. In fact, the switch to ketosis is why low-carb diets work. Even though you could eat enough carbs to prevent ketosis, it's important to clarify why you want to avoid it. There's nothing unhealthy about ketosis, so you may just need to correct any misinformation to make the best decision for your weight-loss goals. Video of the Day Deal With Concerns Over Ketosis Ketosis is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is unfortunate -- ketosis is normal, while ketoacidosis is a dangerous condition related to type 1 diabetes. Most people on a low-carb diet tolerate ketosis without any problems. Then after the pounds are dropped, carb intake is gradually increased so you're out of ketosis by the time you reach the maintenance phase. If you decide to stay in an induction phase longer than the low-carb plan recommends, consult your doctor to be safe. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing ketoacidosis from lack of insulin. Due to the complex metabolism of diabetes, they end up with high levels of blood glucose and ketones, which upsets the body's normal acid-base balance. When that happens, ketosis becomes ketoacidosis, causing symptoms like thirst, frequent urination, dry mouth, nausea, belly pain, rapid breathing and fruity-smelling breath. If you have symptoms, contact your doctor immediately -- diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency. You may be wary about ketosis because you've heard about "ketosis flu." It's not really flu, but in the first few days or weeks of a low-carb diet, some people experience headaches, dizziness, fatigue, constipation or wea Continue reading >>

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

A few months ago, I read a book called The Art and Science of Low-Carbohydrate Living. The authors are two of the world's leading researchers on low-carb diets. Dr. Jeff S. Volek is a Registered Dietitian and Dr. Stephen D. Phinney is a medical doctor. These guys have performed many studies and have treated thousands of patients with a low-carb diet. According to them, there are many stumbling blocks that people tend to run into, which can lead to adverse effects and suboptimal results. To get into full-blown ketosis and reap all the metabolic benefits of low-carb, merely cutting back on the carbs isn't enough. If you haven't gotten the results you expected on a low-carb diet, then perhaps you were doing one of these 5 common mistakes. There is no clear definition of exactly what constitutes a "low carb diet." Some would call anything under 100-150 grams per day low-carb, which is definitely a lot less than the standard Western diet. A lot of people could get awesome results within this carbohydrate range, as long as they ate real, unprocessed foods. But if you want to get into ketosis, with plenty of ketoness flooding your bloodstream to supply your brain with an efficient source of energy, then this level of intake may be excessive. It could take some self experimentation to figure out your optimal range as this depends on a lot of things, but most people will need to go under 50 grams per day to get into full-blown ketosis. This doesn't leave you with many carb options except vegetables and small amounts of berries. If you want to get into ketosis and reap the full metabolic benefits of low-carb, going under 50 grams of carbs per day may be required. Protein is a very important macronutrient, which most people aren't getting enough of. It can improve satiety and incr Continue reading >>

Minimizing The Risk For Ketosis In Dairy Herds

Minimizing The Risk For Ketosis In Dairy Herds

En Español: Minimizando el Riesgo de Cetosis en el Ganado Lechero This article is part of our series of original articles on emerging featured topics. Please check here to see other articles in this series. Introduction Although most cases of ketosis occur in fresh dairy cows, feeding practices and cow health prepartum can predispose cows to experiencing ketosis after calving. Most cases of primary ketosis occur within the first 2 weeks of calving, and even most secondary ketosis (occurring after the onset of another disease) occurs within the first 30 to 60 days in milk. In general, less than 5% of the cows in a herd should experience clinical ketosis. However, some reports have indicated that the incidence of subclinical ketosis may affect 40% of cows, with the incidence rate varying widely among farms, and may be as high as 80% on individual farms. The major focus prepartum to reduce the risk for ketosis after calving is maintaining feed intake in late gestation and avoiding overconditioning cows during late lactation and the dry period. Cows should dry off and freshen at a body condition score (BCS) of 3.5. Cows with a BCS equal to or greater than 4.0 will likely have lower intake prepartum and be at higher risk for fatty liver and ketosis at and after calving. Recent work at the University of Minnesota indicates that cows with a BCS greater than 3.5 and producing over 16 lb of colostrum are at a higher risk for ketosis. Feeding programs for far-off and close-up cows should be designed to maintain intake during late gestation, i.e., minimizing the drop in intake during the last week of gestation, to reduce the risk for ketosis after calving. These prepartum diets should contain high-fiber forages and provide adequate but not excessive amounts of energy. A 20% or gr Continue reading >>

6 Simple Ways To Get Rid Of Ketosis Breath

6 Simple Ways To Get Rid Of Ketosis Breath

Is your breath starting to smell a little funky on the ketogenic diet? Don’t worry, ketosis breath is a common side effect. Here are easy, simple ways to get rid of it. Going on a low carb diet has become a popular way of losing fat and helping to treat some health conditions. The essence of low-carbing is to get most of your calories in the form of fat, protein, and leafy greens, rather than starchy carbs. Do you struggle with bloating, gas, constipation, or other digestive issues? We’ve created a FREE guide to healing your gut naturally. Click here to get your FREE copy of our Digestion Guide! While there are many benefits to starting a low carb diet, you can also experience several unpleasant side effects. The common one we’re going to discuss here is ketosis breath and how you can get rid of it. What is Ketosis Breath? When you go on a strict low carb diet, you’ll probably notice that your breath begins to have a unique, fruity, and sometimes even nail-polish-like smell. To understand why this happens, it helps to have a little background on how your body reacts to a low carb diet. Firstly, the body’s main energy source is glucose, which comes from carbohydrates. When you go on a low carb diet, your body is unable to find any of this fuel, so it enlists it’s backup option: burning fat for energy (1). The problem with ketones is that they contain acetone as part of their makeup, which is what gives them their characteristic smell. When your body begins to burn fat for fuel instead of sugar or carbs (yay, fat loss!) it produces substances called ketones in the process. This state is also referred to as “ketosis,” which is where the nickname “keto” in keto breath comes from. The main way your body burns off ketones is through urine and, you guessed Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Prevent Keto Flu

7 Ways To Prevent Keto Flu

7 Ways To Prevent Keto Flu Have you ever started a ketogenic or low-carb diet only to find that you feel sluggish and brain fogged? What happened to the promise of rapid weight loss, mental clarity, and endless energy? Well you may have encountered Keto Flu. This article covers how to identify it and 7 ways to prevent keto flu so you can reap the full benefits of a ketogenic diet. What Is Keto Flu? The experience of keto flu is often discouraging and can lead many people to fall off their nutrition plan completely. Due to a number of physiological changes that occur during the initial stages of a lower-carb diet, some people experience sluggishness, intense cravings, and many other flu-like symptoms. When many people think that maybe their body just doesn’t respond well to a ketogenic diet, there are typically three underlying causes: hypoglycemia, HPA Axis Dysfunction, and electrolyte imbalance. By addressing these three underlying causes, keto flu can be significantly reduced to improve your keto adaptation process and get you on your way to becoming a fat-burning machine! Keto Adaptation Most people beginning a ketogenic diet have been primarily burning sugar for energy their entire lives. When they all of a sudden stop consuming carbs, the body must then relearn how to burn fat for energy. Hypoglycemia occurs because the body quickly burns through stored sugars and hasn’t yet learned to burn fat, leaving you with an energy deficit (don’t worry it is temporary!) HPA Axis Dysfunction occurs because sudden drops in blood sugar will tend to promote cortisol release (cortisol raises blood sugar). If this happens too much, then your stress response can become dysregulated and stable blood sugar becomes harder to attain. Electrolyte Imbalance occurs due to a drop in Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Ketosis And Low Carb Flu?

How To Avoid Ketosis And Low Carb Flu?

Please help. I was in ketosis for a month and got depressed and tired of worrying about it. So, I want to eat paleo still but do I HAVE to be in keto to lose weight? How do I find a balance between not starving myself of carbs but then not making enough ketones? For instance, I want to eat sweet potatoe sometimes, or maybe some fried green tomatoes occasionally. I maybe even want to eat a hot dog at the fair occasionally. I am totally convinced from reading GaryTaubes books that saturated fat is not bad, so how can I eat it and not be keto AND lose weight? Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

What mistakes are you making when it comes to your health? I know I’ve been making plenty. That’s why I’m tracking my data in this recent ketosis experiment that I’m doing. What about you? Most people think that the ketogenic diet is just “low-carb” which leads them to make many mistakes that prevent them from not reaping all of the benefits of ketosis that they could. What benefits? How about an improved immune system, increased longevity, lower inflammation, effortless weight loss, decreased hunger, reduced risk for disease and more. Read on to know the top 10 ways that people make mistakes with ketosis and how you can prevent them. 1: Not tracking protein intake By far the biggest problem with a ketogenic diet is not tracking how much protein you are eating. The far majority of people are simply eating too much lean protein, which ends up kicking them out of ketosis. Protein can turn into carbs by a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis, meaning “making new carbs.” This then spikes insulin, and reduces ketone levels. Even though you are eating super low carb, this could make your body switch back and forth between energy systems, which will lead to high levels of fatigue or “low carb flu.” The easiest way to avoid this mistake is by tracking your ketone levels to see how you respond to different amounts and different types of meat. Everyone is different, so the only way you can tell is by tracking. I “listened to my body” before and it didn’t work. I wasn’t in ketosis when I thought I was. I also thought ketosis kind of sucked. It didn’t, I was just wrong. The only way you know is by tracking. If you consume more fat with protein, it will slow this effect. So think fattier cuts of meat, and less muscle meat. But wait, are you going to Continue reading >>

How To Safely And Effectively Come Off The Keto Diet

How To Safely And Effectively Come Off The Keto Diet

How to Safely and Effectively Come Off the Keto Diet Everything you need to know about re-introducing carbs into your diet. So you tried the ketogenic diet , the ber-popular low-carb, high-fat eating style. By focusing on high-fat foods (all the avocados!), this type of diet puts your body into a state of ketosis, using fat for energy instead of carbs. For many people, this switch results in weight loss , but most don't (or shouldn't) stick with the keto diet long-term unless they're on it for a medical reason. Here's why, plus how to transition off the diet safely if you're considering doing it. "Life usually ends up getting in the way," says Shoshana Pritzker, R.D., C.D.N., C.S.S.D. , a sports nutritionist and registered dietitian. For most people, how long you can stay on keto is however long you can say "no" to typical social munchies and drinks, she adds. Sometimes, you just want to be able to let loose and eat some processed carbs, right? Plus, there may be health implications to consider. "We're really not sure what kind of health complications may arise from a long-term state of ketosis (i.e., years and years) if any," says Pritzker. And it's not just that. "One reason a person may want to stop keto dieting is if their lipid panel worsens," notes Haley Hughes, R.D. "If a person who is at a high risk for heart disease is eating increased amounts of saturated fat and sources of cholesterol while consuming less fiber from whole grains, beans, fruits, and starchy vegetables, they may see increased cholesterol levels." There are also special concerns for those with type 1 diabetes and people taking insulin, who might not be a good fit for long-term keto dieting, she says. (Related: Healthy But High-Carb Foods You Can't Have On the Keto Diet ) Lastly, the reason for Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Ketosis

How To Maintain Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and more people are learning about the benefits of ketosis on their health and weight loss goals. However, there’s still some confusion around the process itself and the correct ways to maintain ketosis. This information will help you maintain a steady state of ketosis safely and efficiently, no matter your needs. Getting into Ketosis First things first. Before we can maintain ketosis we have to get understand what is ketosis and get into this primal metabolic state. Ketosis occurs when the body has little to no access to carbohydrates, its normal source of fuel, and begins breaking down and burning fat for energy instead. The ketosis process can have many benefits including: Curbed hunger and faster weight loss Improved blood sugar regulation Enhanced cognitive performance Better mental focus Less chance of inflammation Reducing risk for conditions like type II diabetes When the body’s in ketosis, fats are broken down and ketone bodies, or “ketones,” are created for the body to use for energy. Three Main Ways of Maintaining Ketosis Long-term Short-term Cyclical The way you use the ketogenic diet depends on your specific needs, but what’s important is making sure you maintain a state of ketosis during the full time you’re on keto. This is not the same as simple going low-carb, and it requires some extra effort and tracking. However, the results are worth the extra work! Short-Term vs Long-Term Ketosis Just as it sounds, the only difference between short- and long-term ketosis is the amount of time you properly follow the ketogenic diet. The standard version of the ketogenic diet involves eating around 20-50 grams of net carbs per day to keep the body in ketosis, although the exact amount depends on each person. C Continue reading >>

Preventive Strategies For Ketosis

Preventive Strategies For Ketosis

Parturition and the onset of lactation challenges calcium and energy homeostasis in dairy cows predisposing them to periparturient disorders that affect health, production and reproductive performance says Carlos Risco, DVM, Dipl. ACT, University of Florida. Dairy cattle experience a negative carbohydrate balance, from -3 weeks and + 3 weeks from calving and are at risk to develop ketosis, Risco explained at the 2010 Western Veterinary Conference. Milk production, in particular, drives the high requirements for glucose because other fuels cannot substitute for lactose in milk. To counteract this, the cow mobilizes body fat and protein stores in the form of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and amino acids. This promotes gluconeogenesis and occurs under the influence of low serum concentrations of insulin. Volatile fatty acids (acetate, propionate, butyrate [BHBA]) produced in the rumen are also presented to the liver as fuels. Acetate and butyrate are ketogenic, and propionate is glycogenic. The key to prevention of ketosis is to maximize dry matter intake before and after calving to prevent excessive NEFA mobilization. Preventing ketosis in the first place is key to avoid some post-partum issues. Risco outlined some preventive strategies: The transition ration. To prevent ketosis the transition ration should maximize DMI, provide adequate energy density, and minimize ketogenic precursors. Silage with a high butyric acid content should not be fed. Introduce ration changes gradually. Manage transition cows to maximize DMI, e.g., provide adequate bunk space. Avoid over-conditioning of cows in late lactation and the early dry period. Niacin (nicotinic acid) fed in transition rations at 6–12 g /d may help reduce blood ketone levels. Propylene glycol may be administered pr Continue reading >>

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