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How Do You Live With Diabetes Type 2?

Q&a: What It’s Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

Q&a: What It’s Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

A "Do you have diabetes?" poster hung next to an elevator in Premera Manager Kelly Jones's office. By the time the elevator arrived and she stepped in, she had read the poster a couple times — and thought the warning signs sounded familiar. Months earlier, her doctor advised that she was considered "pre-diabetic." He was monitoring her A1c, which measures average blood sugar level over a three-month period, and he recommended she get more exercise and improve her diet. Jones made an effort, but was diagnosed as a type 2 diabetic at her next visit. We asked Jones to share her experience as a diabetic, and offer tips to help others manage this condition, experienced by 30 million Americans. Q: What symptoms of diabetes were listed on the poster? A: Excessive thirst, frequent urination, increased hunger, tiredness, blurred vision or tingling in your hands and feet. It was around Halloween, and I was eating too much candy at the office. So what I was calling "fuzzy brain" was actually a symptom of diabetes. And I was really thirsty. Q: Simply stated, what is diabetes? A: There are two types of diabetes: type 1, where your body is unable to make insulin; and type 2, where your body is unable to properly use the insulin it makes. When your body doesn't have enough insulin, you can't move glucose from your blood to the cells, and then you don't get the nutrients your body needs for energy. Type 2 diabetes is also often genetic, as in my case. Q: What risk factors did you have? A: The extra weight I was carrying was one factor, but not the only one — many people with type 2 diabetes are a normal weight or only moderately overweight. In my case, both my dad and sister have diabetes, so it was in my family history. Q: What have you found is the best approach to managing diabe Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Whether you have type 2 diabetes, are a caregiver or loved one of a person with type 2 diabetes, or just want to learn more, the following page provides an overview of type 2 diabetes. New to type 2 diabetes? Check out “Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics” below, which answers some of the basic questions about type 2 diabetes: what is type 2 diabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more! Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on type 2 diabetes. These pages provide helpful tips for living with type 2 diabetes, drug and device overviews, information about diabetes complications, nutrition and food resources, and some extra pages we hope you’ll find useful! Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics Who is at risk of developing type 2 diabetes? What is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes if it runs in the family? What is type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Behind type 2 diabetes is a disease where the body’s cells have trouble responding to insulin – this is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone needed to store the energy found in food into the body’s cells. In prediabetes, insulin resistance starts growing and the beta cells in the pancreas that release insulin will try to make even more insulin to make up for the body’s insensitivity. This can go on for a long time without any symptoms. Over time, though, the beta cells in the pancreas will fatigue and will no longer be able to produce enough insulin – this is called “beta burnout.” Once there is not enough insulin, blood sugars will start to rise above normal. Prediabetes causes people to have higher-than-normal blood sugars (and an increased risk for heart disease and stroke). Left unnoticed or Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2

Managing Type 2

In type 2 diabetes, your pancreas is still working but not as effectively as it needs to. This means your body is building insulin resistance and is unable to effectively convert glucose into energy leaving too much glucose in the blood. Type 2 diabetes can sometimes initially be managed through lifestyle modification including a healthy diet, regular exercise and monitoring your blood glucose levels. Eating well helps manage your blood glucose levels and your body weight Exercising helps the insulin work more effectively, lowers your blood pressure and reduces the risk of heart disease. Regular blood glucose monitoring tests whether the treatment being followed is adequately controlling blood glucose levels or whether you need to adjust your treatment. The aim of diabetes management is to keep blood glucose levels as close to the target range between 4 to 6 mmol/L (fasting), this will help prevent both short-term and long-term complications. Your healthcare team including your doctor, specialist, dietician and Credential Diabetes Educator, can help you with blood glucose monitoring, healthy eating and physical activity. However, sometimes healthy eating and exercise is not enough to keep the blood glucose levels down. Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition. As time progresses, the insulin becomes more resistant and the pancreas is less effective converting glucose into energy. To help the pancreas convert glucose into energy, people with type 2 diabetes are often prescribed tablets to control their blood glucose levels. Eventually it may be necessary to start taking insulin to control blood glucose levels. This is when your body is no longer producing enough insulin of its own. Sometimes tablets may be continued in addition to insulin. If you require medication as Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. It's very important for it to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Complications of type 2 diabetes Diabetes can cause serious long-term heal Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Family members were often involved in the lifestyle changes that people made after they were diagnosed with diabetes. Many people said that their spouses, partners and children were essential in helping them, and motivating them to keep their diabetes under control. Often the whole family made changes to their diet, and several people thought there had been benefits from doing this. Some involved their younger children or grandchildren when they were doing their blood glucose tests, taking their medication or injections, so that managing diabetes became a natural part of family life. However when people were in denial about their diabetes, it was difficult for families to know what to do. Parents said they educated their children about their diet and lifestyle, and encouraged them to eat healthily and to take more exercise, hoping that it might reduce their chance of getting diabetes. Some were keen to ensure that any sign of diabetes in their children would be picked up quickly. One father encouraged his children to be tested regularly because he believed getting diagnosed early had minimised the impact diabetes had on his health. Social Life Diabetes had little effect on most people's social life. Many had learnt to manage their diabetes so that it didn't affect their ability to eat out in restaurants, at friends' houses, or in social gatherings. Some people said they only had small amounts of food and were careful to avoid sweet or spicy foods (as these are often high in sugar, salt and fat. Spices are not on their own bad for you). Others said that they only ate out occasionally so they felt the odd indulgence was okay. A few people found other's reactions and lack of understanding difficult, which made it harder to keep within their diabetic guidelines and they suf Continue reading >>

How To Manage Type 2 Diabetes

How To Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Edit Article Once you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes you need to learn how to manage the disease. You can live a normal, long and healthy life with type 2 diabetes, if you live a healthy lifestyle. High glucose levels causes damage to nerves, kidneys, blood vessels, and eyes. Once diabetes has been diagnosed, then you need to monitor your health closely. 1 2 Follow the food plan as outlined by your physician or dietitian. Acquire the habit of eating slowly to prevent overeating without feeling hungry or deprived to avoid gaining weight. You will feel satisfied with less food; Google "eating slowly" to learn more about it (How and why it works). If you follow a low glycemic diet, you should focus on foods that are below 55. Regulate your carbohydrates throughout the day, eating about the same amount at each meal. Your dietitian or doctor should give you the amount of carbohydrates you should eat each day. Many diabetic diets have you eat three meals and three small snacks throughout the day. 3 Walk at least 20 to 30 minutes most days of the week. Other types of exercise that can help regulate glucose are biking and swimming. You may wish to break your walk into two or three sessions a day, 10 to 15 minuets each. 4 5 Inspect your feet every day to check for bruising, sores, or blisters. Diabetes damages the nerves, with the damage often beginning with the feet decreasing circulation and sensation. 6 See your diabetes team once or more a year: Primary care (or an endocrinologist): twice a year. Podiatrist: once a year for a thorough foot exam. Ophthalmologist: once a year for a thorough eye exam. (Psychologist: if you often eat unhealthily.) 7 Ask your doctor about lowering your blood sugar and the need for insulin or snacks for your sleep (night or day): not eat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes | Michigan Medicine

Type 2 Diabetes | Michigan Medicine

Type 2 diabetes makes it difficult for a persons body to use the insulin it produces. This is called insulin resistance: the cells of your body do not easily recognize your insulin. If the insulin is not recognized, the "door" to your cells will not open to allow sugar to move from the blood into the cell. Sugar remains in the blood, leading to higher than normal blood sugars. Anyone can develop diabetes. However, people who have a family history of diabetes are more likely to develop it. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes also increases as people become older, sedentary, or overweight. Ethnic background is also an important factor. People of Native American, Latino, African American, and Asian American descent are at greater risk for diabetes. Additionally, people who develop diabetes while pregnant (known as gestational diabetes ) are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes . People of any age can get type 2 diabetes. It is seen most frequently in adults, but type 2 diabetes is rapidly increasing in children and adolescents.Federal statistics estimate that 18.2 million children and adults in the United States 6.3 percent of the population have diabetes. While an estimated 13 million of these have been diagnosed with diabetes, 5.2 million are estimated to have type 2 diabetes and not know it. Most people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. African American, Asian American, Hispanic, Native American or Pacific Islander heritage History of gestational diabetes or having a baby weighing over 9 pounds Having high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure For those with a family history of type 2 diabetes, weight gain and an inactive lifestyle can increase insulin resistance. As insulin resistance increases, your body fights to maintain normal blood sugar levels. It Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This happens when the cells become insensitive to insulin and the blood sugar gradually gets too high. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In type 2, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the cells cannot use it very efficiently. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot make insulin due to auto-immune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Type 2 can be caused by: Lack of activity (sedentary behavior) Genetics Risk factors include: Being overweight Being sedentary including watching more than 2 hours of TV per day Drinking soda Consuming too much sugar and processed food The signs and symptoms of this type of this type of diabetes are sometimes subtle. The major symptom is often being overweight. Other symptoms and signs include: Urinating a lot Gaining or losing weight unintentionally Dark skin under armpits, chin, or groin Unusual odor to urine Blurry vision Often there are no specific symptoms of the condition and it goes undiagnosed until routine blood tests are ordered. A blood sugar level more than 125 when fasting or more than 200 randomly is a diagnosis for diabetes. Treatment is with diet and lifestyle changes that include eating less sugary foods, and foods that are high in simple carbohydrates (sugar, bread, and pasta.) Sometimes a person will need to take drugs, for example, metformin (Glucophage). People with both types of diabetes need monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid high (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Complications include heart and kidney disease, neuropathy, sexual and/or urinary problems, foot problems, and eye problems. This health condition can be prevented by following a Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

Keeping tabs on your blood sugar If you’re not taking insulin, should you be testing your blood glucose during your day? The short answer is yes. You may not be using the results to adjust an insulin dose or the dinner menu, but it’s still important for people with Type 2 diabetes to be aware of their levels. “If there’s no testing, your sugars can be out of whack,” says Tabitha Palmer, a dietitian and certified diabetes educator working in Endocrinology Research at Capital Health in Halifax. “You can feel just fine with high blood sugar, but unfortunately they can still be causing all sorts of problems inside.” You certainly don’t need to test as often as someone with Type 1 diabetes would. But it may be a good idea to check your blood glucose level once or twice during the day. Taking medication Not everyone with Type 2 diabetes takes medication. But if you do, part of your day involves taking your pills or administering your injections. The medication may be prescribed to lower blood sugar, help your body produce insulin or provide the insulin your body can’t produce. About a quarter of people with Type 2 diabetes will eventually need to have insulin injections. “It’s not something that’s considered a failure or your fault. It’s just a natural progression of the disease,” says Palmer. These days, people are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at a much younger age, which means they could be living with the disease for decades. Watching your diet If you have Type 2 diabetes, your daily routine should always include three healthy meals. It’s important to put some planning into what goes on your plate. Because you’re at a high risk for cardiovascular problems, such as heart disease and stroke, your focus should be on low-fat foods. There Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Living With Type 2 Diabetes

In this section you will find information about living with Type 2 Diabetes. You can learn via our Diabetes Smart online programme or you can read the content in this section. Click on Image to download book or collect a hard copy from your GP surgery. This comprehensive booklet contains all you need to know about Type 2 diabetes. Living with Type 2 it is vital to look after your eyes and feet and address your diet. Visit our Care Centre Pages to see the services we provide to reduce the risk of complications with Diabetes. If you need further information or support please call our helpline on 1850 909 909 (Mon-Fri, 9-5pm) or email [email protected] Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Women With Condition Reveal How They Changed Their Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Women With Condition Reveal How They Changed Their Diet

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes means people have to look after their own health. This includes maintaining good physical and mental health, preventing illness or accidents and dealing with minor ailments and long-term conditions. However, a diagnosis doesn’t have to spell the end of a full and happy life, Vitality Health and Life insurance has reiterated. Anna Cartien, 59, was diagnosed two years ago with type 2 diabetes. When she was first diagnosed, Anna immediately told herself she was going to have to ‘buckle down and get it under control’. “It wasn’t easy at first for me to stick to my new habits, but I now feel fantastic,” she said. “I wish I had made these changes earlier.” With a positive mindset, she has adopted a daily exercise routine, eats healthy meals and was even able to do what she thought impossible - quit smoking. When in hospital for kidney stones, Anna’s blood glucose levels were tested which resulted in a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. Prior to this, she had been excessively urinating and felt constantly tired. She now exercises daily, putting in 35 minutes on a rowing machine, and doing about twenty minutes of yoga. Within six months of being diagnosed, Anna lost 20 kg (45lbs), however she said making this change wasn’t easy. “Increasing my exercise was the thing I was most opposed to,” she admits. “I’m glad I made the change though, as it has made a big difference to how I feel”, she said. Anna began a low-carb diet immediately after being diagnosed. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes - Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Making healthy choices is a big part of managing type 2 diabetes. The more you learn about the disease, the more motivated you may be to make good choices and follow your treatment plan. Eat a balanced diet, and try to manage the amount of carbohydrate you eat by spreading it out over the day. The dietary guidelines for good health can help everyone form healthy eating habits, including people who have type 2 diabetes. It is especially important for people with type 2 diabetes to: Shift from eating unhealthy saturated fats to eating healthier unsaturated fats. Avoid foods that contain trans fat. Be careful with alcohol, which affects your blood sugar. It can make problems from nerve damage, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight even worse. Adult women should limit alcohol to 1 drink a day with a meal. Adult men should limit alcohol to 2 drinks a day with a meal. And women who are pregnant should not drink at all. You don't have to join a gym to get fit or be active. There are many things you can do, such as walking or even vacuuming. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that you keep your blood sugar levels at:1 80 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) to 130 mg/dL before meals, when using a home blood sugar test. If you are pregnant, aim for a blood sugar level from 60 mg/dL to 99 mg/dL. Less than 180 mg/dL 1 to 2 hours after meals, using the home blood sugar test. If you are pregnant, aim for 100 mg/dL to 129 mg/dL for your highest blood sugar level 1 to 2 hours after meals. Continue reading >>

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