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How Do You Get Your Blood Sugar Tested?

Should You Get A Free Type 2 Diabetes Screening?

Should You Get A Free Type 2 Diabetes Screening?

Free screenings for diabetes are sometimes available at pharmacies, and even in big-box stores, like Walmart. You may also be able to get a free blood sugar test at your local hospital. But before you go, it’s important to understand the limitations of this blood sugar test. "In most cases, the diabetic test given at a free screening is a point-of-care blood sugar test," says Shannon Knapp, RN, CDE, manager of diabetes education in the department of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. These tests measure blood sugar with a finger prick and a glucose monitor. "Free screenings for diabetes are beneficial but have a lower accuracy rate than lab tests done in a doctor's office," Knapp notes. "They may be given at health fairs, community centers, or local pharmacies, but they are not a substitute for your primary care doctor." There are reasons that free screenings for diabetes may be an early indicator of the disease but still don’t provide a complete picture on their own. "To diagnose diabetes, you generally need two elevated fasting blood sugars," explains Knapp. "It's important to know that if you have free screening for diabetes without fasting, the results are not very useful. Any abnormal diabetic test needs to be followed up with your doctor." Why Get a Free Diabetes Screening? The purpose of this type of screening is to serve as an early alert, hopefully cutting down on the damage done by type 2 diabetes by uncovering it and addressing it early, before you have any complications of high blood sugar. Also, "These screenings have the potential to catch other types of diabetes," adds Knapp. Since more than 29 million Americans have diabetes, and another 86 million are at risk for the disease, early diagnosis is more important th Continue reading >>

Should You Get Your Blood Sugar Levels Checked?

Should You Get Your Blood Sugar Levels Checked?

Although regular checkups are a good way to forge a relationship with your physician and spot early signs of disease, a recent study suggests that it’s not really necessary. The new guidelines, according to Duke University Health System, recommend that people under age 30 get a physical every two to three years, that those 30 to 40 to see a doc every other year, and that those age 50 and up get check-ups annually. Here’s an important consideration, however. Cases of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and pre-diabetes are skyrocketing across the United States, so you might want to get your blood sugar checked on the regular, even if you don’t get a full work-up at the doctor’s office. Diabetes, a disease in which you have a fasting blood sugar level of 126 or higher, affects over 29 million Americans, with some 8 million cases going undiagnosed. Unfortunately, this chronic condition can cause brutal effects on the body, including cardiovascular disease, nerve damage, kidney damage, vision conditions (cataracts and glaucoma), skin conditions, hearing impairment, and Alzheimer’s disease. (Read more about diabetes complications and how to avoid them.) It can ultimately be fatal, ranking as the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. So if you have diabetes, you’ll want to know—so you can keep your blood sugar under control and avoid the most devastating effects of the disease. Risk factors for diabetes include being overweight, family history, race, high blood pressure, and having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). It’s also a good idea to pay attention to these silent diabetes symptoms. In type 1 diabetes, which typically develops during childhood or adolescence, the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells within the pancreas, leaving little o Continue reading >>

Testing Your Blood Sugar Levels: 4 Steps For Effective Testing

Testing Your Blood Sugar Levels: 4 Steps For Effective Testing

Learn how to check your blood sugar levels with these four simple steps that will help you self-monitor your blood glucose more effectively. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with diabetes, there is likely a lot that is running through your mind. One of them may be blood glucose monitoring and testing. Why do I need to test? How do I do it correctly? Can I really trust the numbers? Blood glucose testing is essential to managing your diabetes. It gives you a “snapshot” of your blood glucose levels, which changes throughout the day. You need to be able to trust the results you get from your blood glucose monitor or meter so that you can act on them. Here are three steps to help you get accurate readings: 1. Remember to wash your hands Before you test, wash your hands with warm, soapy water. Then, rinse and dry. Testing on unclean hands (even if they might seem clean) may affect results. For example, say you just ate a bowl of cherries and then tested right after. The sugar from the cherries on your fingers may cause a high result, even though your blood glucose levels are not. 2. Check your meter No meter is 100 percent accurate – there will always be some variation between your meter reading and your lab results. It’s important to understand by how much these results vary. Next time your healthcare professional orders fasting blood work, ask them to check your meter’s accuracy for you. Find out more about -normal blood glucose levels. 3. Use the right test strips for your meter A specific type of test strip should be used for the meter you have. So, be sure to check the type of test strip you need, and use only those strips for your meter. Keep in mind that OneTouch® test strips expire 6 months after you open the vial. 4. Interpreting your results Remember t Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting blood sugar provides vital clues about how the body is managing blood sugar levels. Blood sugar tends to peak about an hour after eating, and declines after that. High fasting blood sugar levels point to insulin resistance or diabetes. Abnormally low fasting blood sugar could be due to diabetes medications. Knowing when to test and what to look for can help keep people with, or at risk of, diabetes healthy. What are fasting blood sugar levels? Following a meal, blood sugar levels rise, usually peaking about an hour after eating. How much blood sugar rises by and the precise timing of the peak depends on diet. Large meals tend to trigger larger blood sugar rises. High-sugar carbohydrates, such as bread and sweetened snacks, also cause more significant blood sugar swings. Normally, as blood sugar rises, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin lowers blood sugar, breaking it down so that the body can use it for energy or store it for later. However, people who have diabetes have difficulties with insulin in the following ways: People with type 1 diabetes do not produce enough insulin because the body attacks insulin-producing cells. People with type 2 diabetes do not respond well to insulin and, later, may not make enough insulin. In both cases, the result is the same: elevated blood sugar levels and difficulties using sugar. This means that fasting blood sugar depends on three factors: the contents of the last meal the size of the last meal the body's ability to produce and respond to insulin Blood sugar levels in between meals offer a window into how the body manages sugar. High levels of fasting blood sugar suggest that the body has been unable to lower the levels of sugar in the blood. This points to either insulin resistance or inadequate insulin production, an Continue reading >>

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Checking your blood sugar, also called blood glucose, is an important part of diabetes care. This tip sheet tells you: why it helps you to know your blood sugar numbers how to check your blood sugar levels what are target blood sugar levels what to do if your levels are too low or too high how to pay for these tests Why do I need to know my blood sugar numbers? Your blood sugar numbers show how well your diabetes is managed. And managing your diabetes means that you have less chance of having serious health problems, such as kidney disease and vision loss. As you check your blood sugar, you can see what makes your numbers go up and down. For example, you may see that when you are stressed or eat certain foods, your numbers go up. And, you may see that when you take your medicine and are active, your numbers go down. This information lets you know what is working for you and what needs to change. How is blood sugar measured? There are two ways to measure blood sugar. Blood sugar checks that you do yourself. These tell you what your blood sugar level is at the time you test. The A1C (A-one-C) is a test done in a lab or at your provider’s office. This test tells you your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months. How do I check my blood sugar? You use a blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar. This device uses a small drop of blood from your finger to measure your blood sugar level. You can get the meter and supplies in a drug store or by mail. Read the directions that come with your meter to learn how to check your blood sugar. Your health care team also can show you how to use your meter. Write the date, time, and result of the test in your blood sugar record. Take your blood sugar record and meter to each visit and talk about your results with your h Continue reading >>

How Often Should You Get Your Blood Sugar Checked?

How Often Should You Get Your Blood Sugar Checked?

Image: Thinkstock Get your blood sugar checked annually if you have prediabetes—higher-than-normal blood sugar levels. Your risk factors determine whether you should be screened annually or every three years. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Test

Blood Glucose Test

What is a Blood Glucose Test? A blood glucose test measures the glucose levels in your blood. Glucose is a type of sugar. It is your body's main source of energy. A hormone called insulin helps move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells. Too much or too little glucose in the blood can be a sign of a serious medical condition. High blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) may be a sign of diabetes, a disorder that can cause heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and other complications. Low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia) can also lead to major health problems, including brain damage, if not treated. Other names: blood sugar, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting blood glucose (FBG), glucose challenge test, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) What is it used for? A blood glucose test is used to find out if your blood sugar levels are in the healthy range. It is often used to help diagnose and monitor diabetes. Why do I need a blood glucose test? Your health care provider may order a blood glucose test if you have symptoms of high glucose levels (hyperglycemia) or low glucose levels (hypoglycemia). Symptoms of high blood glucose levels include: Increased thirst More frequent urination Blurred vision Wounds that are slow to heal Symptoms of low blood glucose levels include: You may also need a blood glucose test if you have certain risk factors for diabetes. These include: If you are pregnant, you will likely get a blood glucose test between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy to check for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that happens only during pregnancy. What happens during a blood glucose test? A health care professional will take a blood sample from a vein Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

The aim of diabetes treatment is to bring blood sugar (“glucose”) as close to normal as possible. What is a normal blood sugar level? And how can you achieve normal blood sugar? First, what is the difference between “sugar” and “glucose”? Sugar is the general name for sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. “Carbohydrate” means a food made only of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. There are various different kinds of sugars. The one our body uses most is called “glucose.” Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies. Then we can use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. When people talk about “blood sugar,” they mean “blood glucose.” The two terms mean the same thing. In the U.S., blood sugar is normally measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dl). A milligram is very little, about 0.00018 of a teaspoon. A deciliter is about 3 1/3 ounces. In Canada and the United Kingdom, blood sugar is reported in millimoles/liter (mmol/L). You can convert Canadian or British glucose levels to American numbers if you multiply them by 18. This is useful to know if you’re reading comments or studies from England or Canada. If someone reports that their fasting blood glucose was 7, you can multiply that by 18 and get their U.S. glucose level of 126 mg/dl. What are normal glucose numbers? They vary throughout the day. (Click here for a blood sugar chart.) For someone without diabetes, a fasting blood sugar on awakening should be under 100 mg/dl. Before-meal normal sugars are 70–99 mg/dl. “Postprandial” sugars taken two hours after meals should be less than 140 mg/dl. Those are the normal numbers for someone w Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

How And When To Test Your Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Most people with diabetes need to check their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. The results help you and your doctor manage those levels, which helps you avoid diabetes complications. There are several ways to test your blood sugar: From Your Fingertip: You prick your finger with a small, sharp needle (called a lancet) and put a drop of blood on a test strip. Then you put the test strip into a meter that shows your blood sugar level. You get results in less than 15 seconds and can store this information for future use. Some meters can tell you your average blood sugar level over a period of time and show you charts and graphs of your past test results. You can get blood sugar meters and strips at your local pharmacy. Meters That Test Other Sites: Newer meters let you test sites other than your fingertip, such as your upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. You may get different results than from your fingertip. Blood sugar levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly than those in other testing sites. This is especially true when your blood sugar is rapidly changing, like after a meal or after exercise. If you are checking your sugar when you have symptoms of hypoglycemia, you should use your fingertip if possible, because these readings will be more accurate. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: These devices, also called interstitial glucose measuring devices, are combined with insulin pumps. They are similar to finger-stick glucose results and can show patterns and trends in your results over time. You may need to check your blood sugar several times a day, such as before meals or exercise, at bedtime, before driving, and when you think your blood sugar levels are low. Everyone is different, so ask your doctor when and how often you should chec Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including brain cells. Carbohydrates are found in fruit, cereal, bread, pasta, and rice. They are quickly turned into glucose in your body. This raises your blood glucose level. Hormones made in the body help control blood glucose level. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

What is a blood sugar test? A blood sugar test is a procedure that measures the amount of sugar, or glucose, in your blood. Your doctor may order this test to help diagnose diabetes. And people with diabetes can use this test to manage their condition. Blood sugar tests provide instant results and let you know the following: your diet or exercise routine needs to change your diabetes medications or treatment is working your blood sugar levels are high or low your overall treatment goals for diabetes are manageable Your doctor may also order a blood sugar test as part of a routine checkup. Or to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes, a condition where your blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Your risk for diabetes increases if any of the following factors are true: you are 45 years old or older you are overweight you don’t exercise much you have high blood pressure, high triglycerides, or low good cholesterol levels (HDL) you have a history of gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby who weighed over 9 pounds you have a history if insulin resistance you are Asian, African, Hispanic, Pacific Islander, or Native American you have a family history of diabetes Checking your blood sugar levels can be done at home or at a doctor’s office. Read on to learn more about blood sugar tests, who they are for, and what the results mean. Your doctor may order a blood sugar test to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes. The test will measure the amount of glucose in your blood. Your body takes carbohydrates found in foods like grains and fruits and converts them into glucose. Glucose, a sugar, is one of the body’s main sources of energy. For people with diabetes, a home test helps monitor blood sugar levels. Taking a blood sugar test can help determine your blood Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood Glucose

How To Test Your Blood Glucose

Tweet Testing your blood glucose with a blood glucose meter allows you manage your diabetes. Watch a video guide on how to test your blood glucose (sugar) levels. For people new to diabetes, this guide to testing your blood glucose levels should get you started. Testing your blood sugar levels helps you to make informed decisions about your diet, activity and, if self-adjusting insulin, dosing requirements. Bear in mind that not all blood glucose meters are the same, so you may need to slightly the modify the method here. What do I need to test my blood sugar? In order to test your blood sugar levels, you will need: a blood glucose meter a test strip and a lancing device Some blood glucose meters may come with test strips and/or lancing devices. If in doubt, ask your healthcare professional. How to test your blood glucose Prepare your kit ready for testing. This should include: your meter, a test strip to hand (it may be advisable to have a spare strip to hand too), the finger pricker (lancing device), cotton wool (optional) and a monitoring diary to record the results Ensure that the finger pricking device has been loaded with a new lancet. Wash and dry your hands - to ensure that the result is not influenced by any sugars that may be present on your fingers A fuller drop of blood will be obtained if your fingers are warm, so it’s worth warming your hands up if you can. Be careful not to overheat your fingers so as not to hurt yourself. Put a test strip into your meter Prick your finger with the lancing device at the sides of the finger as there are less nerve ending here than at the tips or the ‘pads’. Recommended finger: the World Health Organisation recommends the middle or ring fingers are used for blood glucose tests (second and third fingers). You may want Continue reading >>

Glucose Test

Glucose Test

Testing blood sugar levels A glucose test is a type of blood test used to determine the amount of glucose in the blood. It is mainly used in screening for prediabetes or diabetes.[1] Patients are instructed not to consume anything but water during the fasting period. Caffeine will also distort the results. If the person eats during the period in which he or she is supposed to have been fasting then they may show blood sugar levels that may cause his or her doctor to think the person has or is at increased risk of having diabetes. In people already having diabetes, blood glucose monitoring is used with frequent intervals in the management of the condition.[1] There are several different kinds of glucose tests: Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting plasma glucose (FPG): 8 or 12 or 14 hours after eating Glucose tolerance test:[2] continuous testing Postprandial glucose test (PC): 2 hours after eating Random glucose test Reference ranges[edit] Fasting blood sugar[edit] A range of 4 to 5.5 mmol/l (70 to 99 mg/dl) before a meal is normal. Continual fasting levels of 5.5 to 7 mmol/l (101–125 mg/dl) causes concern of possible prediabetes and may be worth monitoring. 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) and above means a risk of diabetes.[3] After a 12‑hour fast, a range of 3.9 to under 5.5 mmol/l (70.2 to 100 mg/dl) is normal; a level of 5.6 to under 7 mmol/l (100 to 126 mg/dl) is considered a sign of prediabetes.[3] Postprandial glucose[edit] Main article: Postprandial glucose test A level of < 7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl) 90 minutes after a meal is normal.[4] See also[edit] Glucose meter Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia [edit] Continue reading >>

How To Test Blood Sugar | Accu-chek

How To Test Blood Sugar | Accu-chek

The steps are similar for many meters, and generally look like this: Wash and dry your handsusing warm water may help the blood flow.1 Turn on the meter and prepare a test strip as outlined in your owner's booklet. Many Accu-Chek meters turn on automatically when a strip is inserted. Choose your spotdon't check from the same finger all the time. Using the side of the fingertip may be less painful than the pads.1 Prepare the lancing device according to the user guide provided, then lance your fingertip or other approved site to get a drop of blood.2 Touch and hold the test strip opening to the drop until it has absorbed enough blood to begin the test. View your test result and take the proper steps if your blood sugar is high or low, based on your healthcare professionals' recommendations. Record the results in a logbook, hold them in the meter's memory or download to an app or computer so you can review and analyze them later. For meter-specific instructions on how to test your blood sugar levels, visit the Accu-Chek Support page for your meter. 1Joslin Diabetes Center. Tips for more pain-free blood glucose monitoring. Available at: . Accessed March 11, 2016. 2Talk with your healthcare professional before deciding if alternate site testing is right for you. Continue reading >>

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