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How Do You Feel When Your Blood Sugar Is High?

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Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep th Continue reading >>

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  1. Kezia

    What does high blood sugar feel like to you?

    Hi everyone,
    I was just reading another thread (about highs and lows) and realised that I don't actually feel anything when my blood sugar levels are high, whereas other people say that they can.
    I was diagnosed type 1 nearly a year ago now, so I'm wondering...
    What does a high feel like?
    How high does your blood sugar have to be in order for you to feel it?
    I think the last may be why I don't feel it - my blood sugar very rarely goes above 10 [180] - so maybe it needs to be higher?
    The only way I know if it's high is if I know that I have eaten something that isn't covered by my insulin... or by testing, of course.
    And yes, I know everyone's different, but I'm wondering if there's a general concensus!

  2. CJ 1978

    Mine has to get pretty high before I feel "different." IF I get up to 250 I feel sick to my stomach and get a dry mouth. Thank goodness it rarely happens.

  3. icedale

    Well, for the first couple of weeks after I got out of hospital, I had readings while I stablisied that I would consider beginning to get high (edit: mostly because it didn't stay up there for very long), up around 12 (216ish) but in the past two months I haven't had a reading over 7 (126).
    But during those two weeks, I did begin to notice very subtle changes just in the way I'd focus when it was up a little higher. It seemed it took ever so slightly longer to focus and get my head around something when it was higher. That's just me though. =)

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