diabetestalk.net

How Do You Feel When Your Blood Sugar Is High?

Share on facebook

How To Bring Down High Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet Having high blood sugar levels can be discomforting and many people wish to know what they can do to help to bring down high blood glucose levels. We look at some of the options for lowering blood glucose in the short term. High blood sugar is commonly known as hyperglycemia. What are the signs of high blood sugar? The classic symptoms of high blood glucose levels are: Feeling very thirsty Needing to go the toilet often Having a dry mouth Feeling tired/lethargic Feeling uncomfortable and irritable Check your blood sugar If you have take medication that may cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), it’s highly advisable to check your blood sugar levels before you try to bring your sugar levels down. This is just in case your blood sugar is normal or low, which can be the case in some situations. Testing of blood sugar before bringing your levels down is particularly important if you take insulin. When to call for medical advice It is important to note that very high blood glucose levels can be dangerous and it is important to be aware of the symptoms and risk factors of the following conditions: Diabetic ketoacidosis - a short term complication most commonly associated with type Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Kezia

    What does high blood sugar feel like to you?

    Hi everyone,
    I was just reading another thread (about highs and lows) and realised that I don't actually feel anything when my blood sugar levels are high, whereas other people say that they can.
    I was diagnosed type 1 nearly a year ago now, so I'm wondering...
    What does a high feel like?
    How high does your blood sugar have to be in order for you to feel it?
    I think the last may be why I don't feel it - my blood sugar very rarely goes above 10 [180] - so maybe it needs to be higher?
    The only way I know if it's high is if I know that I have eaten something that isn't covered by my insulin... or by testing, of course.
    And yes, I know everyone's different, but I'm wondering if there's a general concensus!

  2. CJ 1978

    Mine has to get pretty high before I feel "different." IF I get up to 250 I feel sick to my stomach and get a dry mouth. Thank goodness it rarely happens.

  3. icedale

    Well, for the first couple of weeks after I got out of hospital, I had readings while I stablisied that I would consider beginning to get high (edit: mostly because it didn't stay up there for very long), up around 12 (216ish) but in the past two months I haven't had a reading over 7 (126).
    But during those two weeks, I did begin to notice very subtle changes just in the way I'd focus when it was up a little higher. It seemed it took ever so slightly longer to focus and get my head around something when it was higher. That's just me though. =)

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in diabetes