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How Do You Feel When Your Blood Sugar Is High?

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like

What a High Blood Sugar Feels Like The high blood sugars are what gets me. A high blood sugar is a blood glucose above 140 mg/dL. For me, the symptoms I experience with severe hyperglycemia don’t emerge until well over 250-300 mg/dL. The lows, while urgent and intensely serious are felt differently. I don’t like to compare the two evils but the highs can be just as debilitating and it leaves me feeling depleted. It’s so hard to describe this pain that can’t be seen. I look fine on the outside but inside my body is fighting for energy and I’m suffering from the adverse effects. In these moments all I want to do is cry but I have no tears. I can’t quench my thirst no matter how much water I drink. My whole body aches and I’m staring at the clock waiting for the insulin I’ve given myself to be absorbed; giving my body the relief and nourishment that I desperately need. When my blood sugar is high I despise diabetes the most. When it’s high the minutes and possibly hours it takes for my blood sugar to come down is agonizing. I sit uncomfortably, restless, back and forth to the bathroom checking for ketones and blaming myself. When I know that with diabetes anything is possible. It’s absolutely torturous for anyone to have to go through this. My heads pounding, I’m irritable and utterly exhausted. I feel like I’m being crushed by tons of weight. It feels like syrup is running through my veins. I can’t move. I can’t think. I can’t function properly. I feel useless. These are the moments that I beg and plead to just get back to where I was before the high blood sugar. I become grateful for the bad days that weren’t as bad as this. The high blood sugar could have been caused by a pump malfunction, hormones, stress, illness, wrong dosage, or any n Continue reading >>

What Happens If My Blood Sugar Gets Really High?

What Happens If My Blood Sugar Gets Really High?

Your blood sugar is high when the numbers are 130 mg/dL or higher. High blood sugar can: Make you thirsty Cause headaches Make you go to the bathroom often to urinate (pee) Make it hard to pay attention Blur your vision Make you feel weak or tired Cause yeast infections The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS. High blood sugars cause the body to slow down. When sugar levels are high, blood thickening occurs which causes a reduction of oxygen in the brain and this lessens responses to stimuli. In turn, chemical synapses don’t function properly, reducing the brains ability to process information. This makes it harder to think and process data clearly. It impacts memory recall, attention, concentration, focus, and retention of external information, making learning difficult and in some cases impossible for the child or adult diabetic. Now imagine trying to swim in Jell-O®. For those synapses, the high blood sugar is the same as if you were the Olympic Gold Medalist swimmer Michael Phelps (synapse) and your lane had filled with Jell-O®, causing you not to be able to reach your full potential. If your sugars are normal and your pool (brain) is filled with the proper chemicals and water, you will get to finish (information stored in your brain) faster and sometimes you will win the race (get almost perfect scores on the SAT’s.) This feeling of Jell-O® also causes poor memory recall and prevents new information from assimilating into the memory properly, causing memory loss and poor retention. It hinders the growth of new cells in the brain Continue reading >>

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

You’ve heard people complain about having low blood sugar before and may have even experienced it yourself. But high blood sugar is also an issue that can a) make you feel like crap and b) cause serious health issues if it happens too often. First, a primer: High blood sugar occurs when the level of glucose (i.e. sugar) in your blood becomes elevated. We get our glucose from food, and most foods we eat impact our blood sugar in one way or another, certified dietitian-nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz, R.D., CEO of NY Nutrition Group, tells SELF. “However, foods that are higher in carbohydrates and sugar, yet lower in fat and fiber, such as baked goods, white-flour breads, soda, and candy usually have a bigger impact on blood sugar levels,” she says. In the short-term, they cause sudden rises in blood sugar (i.e. high blood sugar), which can immediately give you a jolt of energy but will inevitably be followed up by a crash. These foods are also usually not great for you, Moskovitz points out, and can cause excess weight gain, high cholesterol, and bodily inflammation. Having high blood sugar here and there happens, and it will basically just make you feel off. You’ll feel worn-out, headachy, all-around tired, cranky, and may have difficulty concentrating, Jessica Cording, a New York-based R.D., tells SELF. But the major problem lies in having chronically high blood sugar, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, a condition in which your body can’t properly regulate blood sugar. If you get chronic high blood sugar, you’ll also often experience the need to pee frequently, increased thirst, and even have blurred vision, Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF. But if you’re not suffering from chronic high blood su Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

How often should I test my blood sugar? This is a very common question, and the answer isn't the same for everyone. In general, you should test as often as you need to get helpful information. There's no point in testing if the information you get doesn't help you manage your diabetes. If you've been told to test at certain times, but you don't know why or what to do with the test results, then testing won't seem very meaningful. Here are some general guidelines for deciding how often to test: If you can only test once a day, then do it before breakfast. Keep a written record so that you can see the pattern of the numbers. If you control your blood sugar by diet and exercise only, this once-a-day test might be enough. If you take medicine (diabetes pills or insulin), you will probably want to know how well that medicine is working. The general rule is to test before meals and keep a record. If you want to know how your meals affect your blood sugar, testing about 2 hours after eating can be helpful. Test whenever you feel your blood sugar is either too high or too low. Testing will give you important information about what you need to do to raise or lower your blood sugar. If you take more than 2 insulin shots a day or use an insulin pump, you should test 4 to 6 times a day. You should test more often if you're having unusually high or low readings, if you're sick, under more stress than usual, or are pregnant. If you change your schedule or travel, you should also test your blood sugar more often than usual. Talk to a member of your health care team about how often to test based on your personal care plan. What should my test numbers be? There isn't one blood sugar target that's right for everyone with diabetes. It's important to work with your health care team to set Continue reading >>

14 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Way Too High

14 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Way Too High

When we hear people discussing high blood sugar levels, the first thing most of us think of is diabetes. Diabetes is an extremely serious condition but long before someone is diagnosed with it, their body will show signs that their blood sugar levels are too high. By educating ourselves on these signs of high blood sugar, we can avoid causing irreversible damage to our bodies. The consumption of glucose through our diet is the most likely cause of elevated sugar levels. Glucose is distributed to every cell in the body and is an essential nutrient (in the right sized doses). However, when the levels of glucose become too high for too long, serious damage is caused to your kidneys, blood vessels, nerves, and eyes. With processed and artificial food making up a significant portion of many people’s diet, the number of people suffering from high blood sugar is increasing. The only way to protect yourself and your loved ones is to begin reading the signs. Play Video Play Mute 0:00 / 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE 0:00 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualSc Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

If you’ve had diabetes for any length of time at all, you’ve probably seen lists of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose dozens of times. Doctors and diabetes educators hand them out. Hundreds of websites reprint them. Most diabetes books list them. You likely know some of the items on the list by heart: thirst, frequent urination, blurry vision, slow healing of cuts, and more. But have you ever stopped to wonder why these symptoms occur? How does high blood glucose cause frequent urination, make your vision go blurry, or cause all of those other things to happen? Here are some answers to explain what’s going on in your body when you have high blood glucose. Setting the stage for high blood glucose High blood glucose (called hyperglycemia by medical professionals) is the defining characteristic of all types of diabetes. It happens when the body can no longer maintain a normal blood glucose level, either because the pancreas is no longer making enough insulin, or because the body’s cells have become so resistant to insulin that the pancreas cannot keep up, and glucose is accumulating in the bloodstream rather than being moved into the cells. What is high blood sugar? Blood glucose is commonly considered too high if it is higher than 130 mg/dl before a meal or higher than 180 mg/dl two hours after the first bite of a meal. However, most of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose don’t appear until the blood glucose level is higher than 250 mg/dl. Some of the symptoms have a rapid onset, while others require a long period of high blood glucose to set in. It’s important to note that individuals differ in their sensitivity to the effects of high blood glucose: Some people feel symptoms more quickly or more strongly than others. But each sign or sympt Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Symptoms And Diabetes

Blood Sugar Symptoms And Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a serious disease in which the pancreas stops producing the hormone insulin. The result is that your body can’t convert sugar into energy. There is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes and there is currently no known cure. Two of the potential warning signs of diabetes are high blood-sugar—or hyperglycemia—and low blood sugar—or hypoglycemia. Blood sugar levels symptoms: Highs and Lows Let’s start with hypoglycemia and look at blood-sugar drop symptoms. Although symptoms may overlap, some of the signs of low blood sugar include dizziness, sweating, shaking, poor coordination, hunger, nausea and irritability. When it comes to hyperglycemia (or sugar shock), you may feel thirsty, have to urinate more frequently, find your vision blurry, feel exhausted, have stomach pain, or notice a fruity or wine-like odor on your breath. See your doctor if you experience high or low blood sugar symptoms If your blood sugar drops to severely low levels it can lead to convulsions, coma or death. While prolonged high blood sugar can lead to eye, organ and other complications or diabetic ketoacidosis, which is also life-threatening. That’s why it’s important to see your doctor, explain which of the blood-sugar symptoms you’re feeling, and go from there. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High Or Too Low

When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High Or Too Low

Sometimes, no matter how hard you try to keep your blood sugar in the range your doctor has advised, it can be too high or too low. Blood sugar that is too high or too low can make you very sick. Here's how to handle these emergencies. What You Need to Know about High Blood Sugar If your blood sugar stays over 240, it is too high. High blood sugar usually comes on slowly. It happens when you don't have enough insulin in your body. High blood sugar can happen if you miss taking your diabetes medicine, eat too much, or don't get enough exercise. Sometimes, medicines you take for other problems may cause high blood sugar. Be sure to tell your doctor about other medicines you take. This chart shows the ranges of blood sugar. Having an infection or being sick or under stress can also make your blood sugar too high. That is why it is very important to test your blood and keep taking your medicine (insulin or diabetes pills) when you have an infection or are sick. Your blood sugar may be too high if you are very thirsty and tired, have blurry vision, are losing weight fast, and have to go to the bathroom often. Very high blood sugar may make you feel sick to your stomach, faint, or throw up. It can cause you to lose too much fluid from your body. Testing your blood sugar often, especially when you are sick, will warn you that your blood sugar may be rising too high. If your blood sugar stays over 300 when you check it two times in a row, call your doctor. You may need a change in your insulin shots or diabetes pills, or a change in your meal plan. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and sa Continue reading >>

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

One of the challenges of managing diabetes is maintaining consistent blood sugar (glucose) levels. Even with diligence, some situations can cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, while others can bring on low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. So it’s important to know the signs of both high and low levels, and what actions to take to bring them back within a desired range. Monitoring your blood sugar levels with a glucose meter will do a lot to help you keep those levels steady and avoid the complications that can come with diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, how often you check your blood sugar level depends on many factors, including your age, the type and severity of your diabetes, the length of time that you've had the condition, and the presence of any diabetes-related complications. About High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Common signs of high blood sugar include frequent urination, fatigue, dry or itchy skin, feeling thirsty, more frequent infections, and eating more food but not gaining as much weight as usual, says Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, California. A blood sugar reading above 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered above normal and can bring on these symptoms, although it’s possible to have high blood sugar without any symptoms, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas says. A reading above 300 mg/dL is considered severe. If your blood sugar is above 250 mg/dL for two days, Philis-Tsimikas advises informing your doctor and asking for specific treatment recommendations. Blood sugar levels above 300 mg/dL can cause nausea, drowsiness, blurred vision, confusion, and dizziness, especially when standing up from a sitting or lying position. Ways to treat high blood sugar include: Taking your prescribed medicati Continue reading >>

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

The human body naturally has sugar, or glucose, in the blood. The right amount of blood sugar gives the body's cells and organs energy. The liver and muscles produce some blood sugar, but most of it comes from food and drinks that contain carbohydrates. In order to keep blood sugar levels within a normal range, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes blood sugar and delivers it to the body's cells. Contents of this article: What does it feel like to have high blood sugar levels? Blood sugar is fuel for the body's organs and functions. But having high blood sugar doesn't provide a boost in energy. In fact, it's often the opposite. Because the body's cells can't access the blood sugar for energy, a person may feel tiredness, hunger, or exhaustion frequently. In addition, high sugar in the blood goes into the kidneys and urine, which attracts more water, causing frequent urination. This can also lead to increased thirst, despite drinking enough liquids. High blood sugar can cause sudden or unexplained weight loss. This occurs because the body's cells aren't getting the glucose they need, so the body burns muscle and fat for energy instead. High blood sugar can also cause numbness, burning, or tingling in the hands, legs, and feet. This is caused by diabetic neuropathy, a complication of diabetes that often occurs after many years of high blood sugar levels. What does high blood sugar mean for the rest of the body? Over time, the body's organs and systems can be harmed by high blood sugar. Blood vessels become damaged, and this can lead to complications, including: Damage to the eye and loss of vision Kidney disease or failure Nerve problems in the skin, especially the feet, leading to sores, infections, and wound healing problems Causes of high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar

Diabetes: High Blood Sugar

www.CardioSmart.org Hyperglycemia means your blood sugar is too high. It can happen if you miss your diabetes medicine, do not eat healthy foods, or do not exercise. Illness, stress, and hormones can also cause your blood sugar to rise. In some people, it occurs for no apparent reason. If you have type 2 diabetes, it may take days for your blood sugar to rise too high. With type 1 diabetes, it may happen faster. By checking your blood sugar, youmay be able to prevent this and avoid an emergency. Signs of high blood sugar You may havemild high blood sugar if you: • Feel very thirsty and urinate more. • Have warm, dry skin. You may havemoderate high blood sugar if you: • Breathe fast and deeply. • Have a fruity breath odor. • Have belly pain, poor appetite, or vomiting. • Are dizzy or weak. • Urinate less. • Have blurred vision that slowly gets worse. • Feel drowsy and have trouble waking up. You may have severe high blood sugar if you: • Have a rapid heart rate and a weak pulse. • Have rapid, deep breathing with a strong, fruity breath odor. • Feel very sleepy and weak. • Fainted or passed out. How to prevent high blood sugar • Post a list of symptoms where you can see it often. Make sure others know the symptoms and what to do in case of an emergency. • Check your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or are not doing your normal routine. • Teach others at work and at home how to check your blood sugar. • Have a medical alert bracelet or other medical identification with you at all times. • Develop a plan. Talk with your doctor about howmuch insulin to take, depending on your blood sugar level. • Take your medicines as prescribed. Do not skip your di Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like? Signs & Symptoms Of Hyperglycemia

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like? Signs & Symptoms Of Hyperglycemia

I get my first cup of coffee and sit on the sun deck with the birds singing. I feel as if I have not slept a wink, and my head aches. I could go back to bed and sleep all day, but work awaits. It’s a beautiful, sunny day, but my body feels heavy, and stuck to the chair. It hurts to lift my arms. My blood sugar was 381 this morning. Again. I think about having to face the day at the office. Driving down the interstate, the lines are blurry. I know that if the DMV got wind of it, I might not be driving as high as my A1C had been. When I get to the office, I walk in with a dark fog feeling surrounding me, and take some deep breaths at my desk. As I begin to review the end of the month reports, the numbers get fuzzy, and I can’t concentrate on them. My 36 ounce water bottle with only a few sips left beads sweat on the desk, and it’s across the building to get to the bathroom. Sometimes it’s a race to get there in time. My body is taught and swollen, like the Blueberry Girl from Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. My blood sugar is a blue river of sticky blueberry filling as I roll down the hall toward the bathroom. I feel that if I had a needle, I could pop myself. That would surely be a mess. My skin is so dry and flaky that no amount of lotion will hydrate it. No amount of water can quench my thirst, and my mouth feels like the Sahara Desert. With one hand on the water cooler, and the other hand on the bathroom door, I guzzled down what I could until the feeling hit that I wasn’t going to be able to wait any longer. I was out of regular insulin, and I had taken my long acting insulin. I was not so patiently waiting for it to kick in. This morning was not starting out so well. I’d have to tackle the reports in my current brain fog. I did have a doctor’s appoin Continue reading >>

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Grapefruit also has a low glycemic index (GI), around 25, which means it doesn't raise blood sugar as quickly or as much as high-GI foods like white bagel (72) or even a banana (48) or watermelon (72). (The highest GI score is 100.) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found that people who ate grapefruit (juice or half a fruit) before a meal had a lower spike in insulin two hours later than those taking a placebo, and fresh grapefruit was associated with less insulin resistance. All 91 patients in the 12-week study were obese, but they did not necessarily have type 2 diabetes. While the results are promising in those without diabetes, blood-sugar reactions to food can vary widely, so if you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, test your blood sugar after eating grapefruit to make sure it can be part of your healthy eating plan. Getty Images Blood sugar is a tricky little beast. Yes, you can get a high reading if you throw caution to the wind and eat several slices of cake at a wedding. The problem is that you can also have a high blood sugar reading if you follow every rule in the type 2 diabetes handbook. That's because it's not just food that affects blood sugar. You could have a cold coming on, or stress may have temporarily boosted your blood sugar. The reading could be wrong, and you need to repeat it. Or it could mean that your medicine is no longer working, and it's time to try a new one. The point is, it's the pattern that matters, not a single reading. Whatever you do, don't feel bad or guilty if you have a high blood sugar reading. A 2004 study found that blood sugar monitoring often amplifies feelings of being a "success" or "failure" at diabetes, and when readings are consistently high, it can trigger feelings of anxiety or self-bla Continue reading >>

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

High blood sugar symptoms Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrong—and cells aren't absorbing the glucose—the resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes. An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesn’t use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. That’s why it’s so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. “If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications,” says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Here’s a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. No symptoms at all Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That's why it’s a good idea to get your blood sugar test Continue reading >>

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