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How Do You Feel When Your Blood Sugar Is High?

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What Happens In The Body When You Experience Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Have you ever wondered what is happening in your body when you get those dreaded symptoms of high blood sugar? The symptoms are fairly easy to recognize and are treatable, but it may help to understand what is going on behind the scenes in order to keep your body running in peak condition. High blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, occurs when there is too much glucose in the bloodstream because the cells of the body are not able use it. There are a number of reasons that this happens, all of them resulting in the same uncomfortable symptoms that alert you that something isn’t quite right. There is more to the story behind each symptom. Hopefully by understanding what is going on in your body when you get these symptoms, you will be motivated to prevent these incidences from happening to keep your body as healthy as possible. Some of the first symptoms that are felt are extreme thirst and an increased appetite. The reason these symptoms occur is because when there is not enough insulin to help regulate the excess sugar in the bloodstream, the glucose does not get absorbed into the cells and your body thinks that you are starving. Another symptom is frequent urination. This oc Continue reading >>

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  1. Kezia

    What does high blood sugar feel like to you?

    Hi everyone,
    I was just reading another thread (about highs and lows) and realised that I don't actually feel anything when my blood sugar levels are high, whereas other people say that they can.
    I was diagnosed type 1 nearly a year ago now, so I'm wondering...
    What does a high feel like?
    How high does your blood sugar have to be in order for you to feel it?
    I think the last may be why I don't feel it - my blood sugar very rarely goes above 10 [180] - so maybe it needs to be higher?
    The only way I know if it's high is if I know that I have eaten something that isn't covered by my insulin... or by testing, of course.
    And yes, I know everyone's different, but I'm wondering if there's a general concensus!

  2. CJ 1978

    Mine has to get pretty high before I feel "different." IF I get up to 250 I feel sick to my stomach and get a dry mouth. Thank goodness it rarely happens.

  3. icedale

    Well, for the first couple of weeks after I got out of hospital, I had readings while I stablisied that I would consider beginning to get high (edit: mostly because it didn't stay up there for very long), up around 12 (216ish) but in the past two months I haven't had a reading over 7 (126).
    But during those two weeks, I did begin to notice very subtle changes just in the way I'd focus when it was up a little higher. It seemed it took ever so slightly longer to focus and get my head around something when it was higher. That's just me though. =)

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8 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Control

1. You’re always thirsty and have to use the bathroom often Excessive sugar in the blood forces your kidneys to work overtime to filter and absorb the sugar. If your kidneys can’t keep up, the sugar is secreted into the urine along with fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination and can lead to dehydration, causing your body to want to drink more. In a never-ending cycle, as you drink more, you urinate more. 2. You feel sluggish and tired If your blood sugars are high, fatigue can quickly set in—your body is having a difficult time functioning since the muscles can’t absorb blood sugar properly and get the energy they need. You also may feel tired from being dehydrated due to increased urination. 3. You feel dizzy or shaky Feeling dizzy or shaky is often a sign of too low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. If you’re not careful, your blood sugar can drop to dangerous levels, which can result in coma or even death. Your brain needs blood sugar to run, and if you are low you need to quickly replenish your body with the sugar it lacks. Consume about 15 grams of carbohydrates from orange juice, glucose tablets, or a sweet snack. If you feel shaky and dizzy oft Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Kezia

    What does high blood sugar feel like to you?

    Hi everyone,
    I was just reading another thread (about highs and lows) and realised that I don't actually feel anything when my blood sugar levels are high, whereas other people say that they can.
    I was diagnosed type 1 nearly a year ago now, so I'm wondering...
    What does a high feel like?
    How high does your blood sugar have to be in order for you to feel it?
    I think the last may be why I don't feel it - my blood sugar very rarely goes above 10 [180] - so maybe it needs to be higher?
    The only way I know if it's high is if I know that I have eaten something that isn't covered by my insulin... or by testing, of course.
    And yes, I know everyone's different, but I'm wondering if there's a general concensus!

  2. CJ 1978

    Mine has to get pretty high before I feel "different." IF I get up to 250 I feel sick to my stomach and get a dry mouth. Thank goodness it rarely happens.

  3. icedale

    Well, for the first couple of weeks after I got out of hospital, I had readings while I stablisied that I would consider beginning to get high (edit: mostly because it didn't stay up there for very long), up around 12 (216ish) but in the past two months I haven't had a reading over 7 (126).
    But during those two weeks, I did begin to notice very subtle changes just in the way I'd focus when it was up a little higher. It seemed it took ever so slightly longer to focus and get my head around something when it was higher. That's just me though. =)

  4. -> Continue reading
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What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like

What a High Blood Sugar Feels Like The high blood sugars are what gets me. A high blood sugar is a blood glucose above 140 mg/dL. For me, the symptoms I experience with severe hyperglycemia don’t emerge until well over 250-300 mg/dL. The lows, while urgent and intensely serious are felt differently. I don’t like to compare the two evils but the highs can be just as debilitating and it leaves me feeling depleted. It’s so hard to describe this pain that can’t be seen. I look fine on the outside but inside my body is fighting for energy and I’m suffering from the adverse effects. In these moments all I want to do is cry but I have no tears. I can’t quench my thirst no matter how much water I drink. My whole body aches and I’m staring at the clock waiting for the insulin I’ve given myself to be absorbed; giving my body the relief and nourishment that I desperately need. When my blood sugar is high I despise diabetes the most. When it’s high the minutes and possibly hours it takes for my blood sugar to come down is agonizing. I sit uncomfortably, restless, back and forth to the bathroom checking for ketones and blaming myself. When I know that with diabetes anything is Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Kezia

    What does high blood sugar feel like to you?

    Hi everyone,
    I was just reading another thread (about highs and lows) and realised that I don't actually feel anything when my blood sugar levels are high, whereas other people say that they can.
    I was diagnosed type 1 nearly a year ago now, so I'm wondering...
    What does a high feel like?
    How high does your blood sugar have to be in order for you to feel it?
    I think the last may be why I don't feel it - my blood sugar very rarely goes above 10 [180] - so maybe it needs to be higher?
    The only way I know if it's high is if I know that I have eaten something that isn't covered by my insulin... or by testing, of course.
    And yes, I know everyone's different, but I'm wondering if there's a general concensus!

  2. CJ 1978

    Mine has to get pretty high before I feel "different." IF I get up to 250 I feel sick to my stomach and get a dry mouth. Thank goodness it rarely happens.

  3. icedale

    Well, for the first couple of weeks after I got out of hospital, I had readings while I stablisied that I would consider beginning to get high (edit: mostly because it didn't stay up there for very long), up around 12 (216ish) but in the past two months I haven't had a reading over 7 (126).
    But during those two weeks, I did begin to notice very subtle changes just in the way I'd focus when it was up a little higher. It seemed it took ever so slightly longer to focus and get my head around something when it was higher. That's just me though. =)

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

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