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How Do I Take Januvia?

Januvia Tablets

Januvia Tablets

Brand Information Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet Please read this leaflet carefully before you start using Januvia Tablets. Download CMI (PDF) Download large text CMI (PDF) What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about JANUVIA. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking JANUVIA against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. What JANUVIA is used for JANUVIA is used to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus alone or in combination with certain other medicines (metformin, medicines such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, a sulfonylurea medicine such as glimepiride, gliclazide and glibenclamide, or insulin), when diet plus exercise or the other medicine(s) do not provide adequate blood sugar level control. Type 2 diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a condition in which your body does not make enough insulin and the insulin that your body produces does not work as well as it should. Your body can also make too much sugar. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems. The main goal of treating diabetes is to lower your blood sugar to a normal level. Lowering and controlling blood sugar may help prevent or delay complications of diabetes, such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and amputation. High blood sugar can be lowered by diet and exercise and by certain medicines. How JANUVIA works JANUVIA is a member of a class Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin

Sitagliptin

Sitagliptin is used along with diet and exercise and sometimes with other medications to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (condition in which blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally). Sitagliptin is in a class of medications called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. It works by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances that lower blood sugar when it is high. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Taking medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Sitagliptin comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day with or without food. Take sitagliptin at around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take sitagliptin exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Sitagliptin helps to control high blood sugar but does not cure diabetes. Continue to take sitagliptin even if you feel well. Do not stop taking sitagliptin withou Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia®?

What Is Januvia®?

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Late-breaking Observational Data Show Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Taking Januvia (sitagliptin) And Metformin Initiated Insulin Therapy At A Slower Rate Compared To Patients Taking A Sulfonylurea And Metformin

Late-breaking Observational Data Show Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Taking Januvia (sitagliptin) And Metformin Initiated Insulin Therapy At A Slower Rate Compared To Patients Taking A Sulfonylurea And Metformin

WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J., June 14, 2014 - Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced results from a late-breaking observational study that assessed the differences in time to initiation of insulin use and the proportion of the population initiating insulin among patients with type 2 diabetes taking the combination of JANUVIA® (sitagliptin) and metformin, and patients taking the combination of a sulfonylurea and metformin. In this study, patients treated with a combination of JANUVIA and metformin initiated insulin therapy at a slower rate during the period of observation than patients treated with a combination of sulfonylurea and metformin. "Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, so that over time many patients need to add insulin to their treatment regimens to maintain blood sugar control," said Peter Stein, M.D., vice president, Clinical Research for diabetes and endocrinology, Merck Research Laboratories. "This study provides insight about different oral treatment regimens and their possible effect on initiation of insulin under real-world conditions. Real-world research is an important complement to clinical trials as we seek to improve patient health outcomes." JANUVIA is indicated, as an adjunct to diet and exercise, to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. JANUVIA has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk of developing pancreatitis while taking JANUVIA. JANUVIA is contraindicated in patients with a history of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to sitagliptin, such as anaphylaxi Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitagliptin)

Januvia (sitagliptin)

What is it used for? Januvia can be used on its own to improve blood sugar control in people whose blood sugar is not controlled by changes to their diet and exercise alone and who can't take metformin. Januvia is also used for people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not sufficiently controlled by other antidiabetic medicines. It can be added to treatment with metformin, a sulphonylurea (for example gliclazide) or another type of antidiabetic medicine known as a thiazolidinedione (for example pioglitazone or rosiglitazone). It can also be used for people who are using insulin. How does it work? Januvia tablets contain the active ingredient sitagliptin, which is a type of medicine called a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. It is used to treat people with type 2 or non-insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM). Sitagliptin works by increasing the amount of two incretin hormones found in the body, called glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). These hormones are normally produced naturally by the body in response to food intake. Their function is to help control blood sugar (glucose) levels. GLP-1 and GIP have four main actions that help to control blood glucose. Firstly, they stimulate the pancreas to produce insulin in response to increasing levels of glucose in the blood. (Insulin is the main hormone responsible for controlling sugar levels in the blood. It causes cells in the body to remove sugar from the blood.) GLP-1 also reduces the production of glucagon. (Glucagon is a hormone that normally increases glucose production by the liver.) GLP-1 and GIP also reduce the rate at which food passes from the stomach into the intestines, which slows down the absorption of glucose from the gut into the bloodstream. Finally, Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

I'm maxed out on metformin (850 mg 3x/day) and glyburide (5mg 4x/day). Januvia, even without the other 2 meds, had my readings in the desired ranges in a day. It's only been 5 days, but so far VERY GOOD! Thanks! Started Januvia 100 mg once a day with in days I had joint pain so bad I did not want to get out of bed and the join pain has not went away its not as bad but still there. Chronic heart pain my heart beat so hard and fast I worried I was having a heart attack. My chest was/is sore I have congestion, I still have a fast heart beat off and on "This worries me". Shortness of breath. I was dizzy, chest colds, Very bad headache, Both hands were numb this was worse at night I would wake with my hands hurting I still have some numbness it is off and on and and mostly in my fingers now. I was so hoping Januvia would work for me. I do not think this drug was not tested well enough before the public was allowed to use it. I hope my side effects are not long term and no damage was caused and with time will go away. I was on another medication for type 2 diabetes and it didnot work for me. My doctor didn't want to take me off of it because he said it work for most people. Well, I change Doctors and the new Doctor stated me on Januvia 50 mg in the AM and 50 in the PM and it started to work at the end of the week, no side effects, my number was very close to normal and I feel GREAT . I even lost weight while on this medication. My husband is on 50 mg a day and doing great with no side effects. Family member had a rash with this medicine, and a friend said there was a new warning posted about a deadly disease called Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with Januvia. I didn't find it in WebMd though. Is it true? Januvia (with metformin) has worked very well for me so far (3 mont Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Januvia And Metformin

What You Should Know About Januvia And Metformin

Januvia and Metformin are both oral diabetes drugs that are used to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic condition where a person cannot make enough insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a natural hormone that is produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. This naturally occurring hormone works by transporting glucose into the body tissues where it is stored and used for energy. Glucose is a form of sugar which is one of the main sources of energy for the body. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into the cells. This leads to a build up of glucose in the bloodstream, which, if not treated, could lead to life threatening conditions. People with type 2 diabetes and a valid prescription can take Januvia and Metformin as a combination medicine together with exercise and diet to control blood sugar levels. However, you should not take these medications to treat type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas produces little or no insulin as a result of the immune system mistakenly attacking the beta cells. What is Januvia? Januvia is the brand name of sitagliptin and works by regulating the amount of insulin that is produced after taking a meal. You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to sitagliptin or in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. This medication is not supposed to be taken by anyone who is below the age of 18. You can take it with or without food. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes drug which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the brand name of glucophage. This medication can be taken in combination with other medications to control blood sugar levels. The medication works in the body by reducing the amount of glucose that is produced in the liver and decreasing glucose ab Continue reading >>

Januvia Really Works For Me!

Januvia Really Works For Me!

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've been on maximum dose Metformin and Gliclazide for 6 years or so and at my GP appointment last week my HBA1C was 7.7 up from 6.7 last time and my own BS readings showed my BS going anything up to 15 two hours after a meal. I expected and even suggested that I go on to insulin as I was having to be extremely careful with food quantities and carbs to maintain even 7.7 HBA1C. My GP said I should I should not be trying to eat 'abnormally' (or be using a meter!) and after a some 'discussion' we agreed I would go onto Sitagliptin (Januvia). My GP warned me to be careful of hypos. I wasn't too worried as Gliclazide had not really worked for me and what I read about Sitagliptin is that it is self-controlling and doesn't itself add to hypo risk as it stops working as BS reaches normal levels. Anyway my BS measurements over the last week show a dramatic drop in my BS levels e.g. 6 to 7 two hours after a meal and also 6 after a gym workout after a small breakfast showing hypos not being an issue. For me Januvia is amazing (so far) with no apparent side effects. Perhaps it won't last and as my Type 1.5'ish diabetes, my diagnosis, doesn't exhibit the typical Type 2 insulin resistant symptoms it may not work for others. Anyone else any experience of Januvia? Because I am having a few odd high BG readings 2hr+ meals I have been hitting 17 ish also odd 9+ before meals Since Operation Dec my BG levels bit by bit are coming up both Met and Glit have been increased Always had good BG control odd blip with other Meds and Operations Diet is much the same always been lower ish Carb, Now smaller meals ,as less active in the wheels finding it harder to keep weight level Continue reading >>

Januvia® May Help Lower Your Blood Sugar (a1c)

Januvia® May Help Lower Your Blood Sugar (a1c)

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sitagliptin (janumet)

Metformin And Sitagliptin (janumet)

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Janumet Xr

Janumet Xr

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Sitagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Proper Use Drug information provided by: Micromedex Your doctor will tell you how much of this medicine to use and how often. Your dose may need to be changed several times in order to find out what works best for you. Do not use more medicine or use it more often than your doctor tells you to. This medicine should come with a Medication Guide. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions. Metformin and sitagliptin combination should be taken with meals to help reduce any stomach upset. Take the extended-release tablets as directed in the evening. Swallow the extended-release tablet or immediate-release tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is the most important part of controlling your diabetes, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. While taking Janumet® XR, you may see tablets in your stools. If you see tablets in your stool several times, tell your doctor right away. Do not stop taking this medicine without checking first with your doctor. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine. For type 2 diabetes: For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets): Fo Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Take sitagliptin tablets once a day. Remember to follow any advice you have been given about your diet. The most common side-effects are feeling sick (nausea), headache, and nose or throat infections. About sitagliptin Type of medicine An antidiabetic medicine Used for Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Januvia®; Janumet® (a combination tablet containing sitagliptin with metformin) Available as Tablets Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar (glucose) in their blood. This is because good control of blood glucose levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like sitagliptin are given alongside the changes in diet. Sitagliptin works in part by increasing the amount of insulin produced by your body. It also reduces the amount of a substance called glucagon being produced by your pancreas. Glucagon causes your liver to produce more sugar, so by reducing the amount of glucagon in your body, this also helps to reduce the levels of glucose in your blood. Before taking sitagliptin Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking sitagliptin it is important that your doctor knows: If you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding. If you have any problems with the way your kidneys w Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

What is Januvia? Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. It works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Januvia is for treating people with type 2 diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use Januvia if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Before taking this medicine You should not use Januvia if you are allergic to sitagliptin, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). To make sure Januvia is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); heart problems; pancreatitis; high triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood); gallstones; or a history of alcoholism. Januvia is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Your name may need to be listed on a Januvia pregnancy registry when you start using this medicine. It is not known whether sitagliptin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Januvia is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. How should I take Januvia? Take Januvia exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. You may take Januvia with or without food. Follow your doctor's instructions. Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need othe Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about JANUVIA. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking JANUVIA against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. What JANUVIA is used for JANUVIA is used to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus alone or in combination with certain other medicines (metformin, medicines such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, a sulfonylurea medicine such as glimepiride, gliclazide and glibenclamide, or insulin), when diet plus exercise or the other medicine(s) do not provide adequate blood sugar level control. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a condition in which your body does not make enough insulin and the insulin that your body produces does not work as well as it should. Your body can also make too much sugar. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems. The main goal of treating diabetes is to lower your blood sugar to a normal level. Lowering and controlling blood sugar may help prevent or delay complications of diabetes, such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and amputation. High blood sugar can be lowered by diet and exercise and by certain medicines. How JANUVIA works JANUVIA is a member of a class of medicines you take by mouth called DPP-4 inhibitors (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) that lowers blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes mell Continue reading >>

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