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How Do I Reduce My Risk Of Diabetes?

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

How Does Exercise Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

How Does Exercise Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that by 2050, one in three American adults could have diabetes. Exercise, whether aerobic or resistance-based such as weight training, is considered one of the most effective lifestyle habits individuals at risk can adopt to prevent potential cases from becoming actual cases. It has been shown that exercise has a greater protective effect for those at highest risk. In some instances, exercise has a greater beneficial effect than dietary modifications or even weight loss on the management of blood sugar. Effects on Blood Sugar Regulation Exercise causes skeletal muscle to be more sensitive to insulin, the chemical signal that tells cells to absorb glucose. As a result, exercise speeds the clearance of glucose out of the blood and into skeletal muscle cells, which need glucose in higher quantities during increased activity. Exercise also increases blood flow to muscles, thereby making more glucose available for the muscles to absorb. In older individuals, decreased insulin sensitivity, which is a lowered responsiveness of cells to insulin, is common. This is associated primarily with decreased levels of physical activity and is readily reversed through resumption or increase in exercise levels. There is an alternate pathway, carried out by an enzyme called AMP kinase, that initiates glucose transport from blood to cells without the use of insulin. This is especially important and helpful in light of the prevalence of insulin resistance in those at risk for diabetes. Exercise is found to increase levels of AMP kinase. Certain storage and distribution patterns of fat are seen as red flags for health risks. Individuals who have the tendency to store fat around the abdomen are often found to have other health risk facto Continue reading >>

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Piggybacking the obesity epidemic, diabetes rates continue to surge. On June 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new and alarming statistics on diabetes. An estimated 29 million Americans have the disease, a nearly 12 percent increase from the 26 million diabetics in 2010. One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes. The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. The good news is type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the antidiabetes drug metformin. 7 tips to help reduce your risk: Lose excess body fat. Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent. Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar. Drink water. Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls. Move your body. Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive t Continue reading >>

The Health Mistake Fit Women Make

The Health Mistake Fit Women Make

Lower Your Diabetes Risk Do you go to the gym after sitting at your desk all day? Run or bike outside regularly? Are you watching your weight? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may be at risk for type 2 diabetes. What the...? Turns out that the disease is a hidden threat to otherwise healthy women. "Even those who are slim and physically fit may be at risk," says Leonid Poretsky, MD, director of the Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. That's something many people, and even some doctors, are not aware of. In fact, the majority of us don't really understand what diabetes is and the havoc it can cause. So here's the deal: Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin, a hormone that helps cells convert both sugars and starches (aka glucose) into energy, and doesn't respond properly to the insulin it does make. Glucose then builds up in the blood, which can lead to a host of complications, including heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. Even scarier is that nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, and almost 6 million of them are undiagnosed, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The incidence is expected to rise significantly: Some experts estimate that the number of Americans with type 2 diabetes will double in the next 25 years. "Diabetes is an epidemic," Dr. Poretsky says. Fortunately, you can help protect yourself. We're not talking about difficult, time-consuming lifestyle changes, but simple, everyday tweaks to your routine that can help reduce your risk of the disease and boost your overall health. Make these nine smart moves today. Keeping up with the kids—a reality TV show no one would watch! How to do it IRL provided by Emergen-C 9 Ways Continue reading >>

The Data Are In: Eat Right, Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes

The Data Are In: Eat Right, Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes

The data are in: Eat right, reduce your risk of diabetes Faculty Editor, Harvard Health Publishing Heres a new medical study with a conclusion that might just change your life: eat healthy. Sure, youve heard it before, but this time the benefit is the prevention of diabetes. Thats a big deal, especially if, like so many other people, you are at risk for the disease. More on that in a moment. First, lets review the study. Researchers publishing in PLoS Medicine describe a study of more than 200,000 people in the U.S. who participated in health surveys over a 20-year period. They found that: People who chose diets that were predominately of plant-based foods developed type 2 diabetes 20% less often than the rest of the study subjects. For those with the very healthiest plant-based diets (including fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, and whole grains), the reduction in type 2 diabetes was 34%. On the other hand, those who made less healthy choices (such as sugar-sweetened beverages and refined grains) developed type 2 diabetes 16% more often than the rest. Its worth emphasizing that this was not a study of the effect of being a vegan or of following an expensive, pre-packaged diet plan that might be hard to maintain over time. This was a study of normal dietary choices across a spectrum, from largely animal-based to largely plant-based with all variations in between. That makes it more applicable to the average person. While this type of study cannot prove that the reduction in diabetes was strictly due to the difference in diet, the dose response (the higher degree of protection with the very healthiest diets) is strongly suggestive of real effect due to diet. The USDAs current dietary guidelines (called MyPlate) urge everyone to choose healthy foods. For example: Half of e Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Cut Your Risk Of Diabetes

5 Ways To Cut Your Risk Of Diabetes

The older we get, the more likely we are to get diabetes, specifically type 2. Around 1 in 7 older people have diabetes and these numbers are likely to rise. Although no-one completely understands the causes of diabetes, if you control the risk factors, you can reduce your chances of getting it. The facts about diabetes It's estimated that 4.5 million people are living with diabetes in the UK. A further 1.1 million people may have diabetes but haven't been diagnosed. 9 out of 10 of these cases are type 2 diabetes, the preventable form of the condition. Although we don’t know the causes, there are a number of factors that can increase your chance of developing type 2 diabetes, so by taking simple steps, you can lower your chances of getting it. Quite simply, shedding pounds will drastically reduce your chances of getting type 2 diabetes. 80% of people who have diabetes are overweight, so if you are overweight or obese, it’s time to think about cutting back. A good measure is your waist size. More than 31.5 inches (80cm) for a woman and 37 inches (94cm) for a man and you need to start thinking about cutting back. It goes without saying that increasing the amount of time you spend exercising will make you feel better and help towards losing weight. Research has found that regular exercise can reduce your risk of developing by up to 64%, so it is backed up by science. Talk to your GP for an idea of some suitable exercises for you. Most people are aware of smoking’s link to cancer, but not as many understand how it’s connected to diabetes. Smoking has been proven to increase blood pressure levels, which are known to be a major cause of diabetes. A diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt and contains a lot of fruit and veg will reduce your cholesterol levels – a sim Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Around three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. However you’ve found out you’re at risk – and knowing is a big first step – the important thing to do now is take action to lower your risk. Evidence shows the best way to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes is by: eating better moving more reducing your weight if you’re overweight Where do I start? The key is to find what works for you, fits in with your day and you enjoy. 1. Set clear goals Setting goals can help you break down what you need to do and how to do it. Use our Action Plan (PDF, 66KB)to set healthy goals and keep aFood and activity diary (PDF, 40KB)to keep you on track. 2. Plan ahead It’s helpful to plan meals for the week ahead especially when we all lead busy lives. This can help you reach your goal to eat better and stick to a budget. 3. Start to make healthy changes Time to put your plan into action. Each healthy choice you make is helping you to achieve your goal. If you find it hard, don’t give up – start again tomorrow. 4. Be creative Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring. Take the opportunity to try new recipes and new food. 5. Sleep well Get a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that if you are tired you feel hungrier and are more likely to want fatty and sugary foods. This can make it harder to stick to your goals. What changes can I make to eat better? Eating better doesn’t have to mean boring or tasteless. We've got plenty of tools, tips and recipes to help you eat healthier. We've got healthier versions of your favourite recipes, or follow our videos and learn to cook a new recipe. How can I move more every day? Getting active and staying active will reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, and you’ll feel great too. If you're not sur Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Diabetes?

Focus on prevention There are four million people with diabetes in the UK – that's one in every 16 people. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is less common and is not preventable. Type 2 is predominantly associated with weight gain and a sedentary lifestyle, but there are other risk factors. In the UK, 90% of diabetics are type 2. If your blood sugars are abnormally high, but are not in the diabetic range, you may be diagnosed as prediabetic. This means you have a high risk of developing diabetes. The good news is that around 80% of cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable. Find out what you can do to reduce the likelihood of developing the condition. Are you at risk? Type 2 diabetes can come on slowly and the signs may not be obvious, so it is important to understand the risk factors. Do you have a large waist? (A large waist is classified as more than 80cm/31.5in in women, 94cm/37in in men or 90cm/35in in South Asian men. Measure your waist around your belly button – do not go by trouser size, which is misleading.) Do you suffer from mental health problems, including bipolar illness, depression or stress? Oops! We're sorry, something went wrong with the quiz. Please try again. People with type 2 diabetes who have not yet been diagnosed can display symptoms such as extreme thirst, tiredness and needing to go to the toilet more often, but you could also be symptom free and still have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes. Eating well to beat diabetes If you are overweight or have a large waist, type 2 diabetes can be avoided or delayed by reducing your weight and waist size. Along with increased activity, a healthy diet will help you manage your weight. But what exactly is a 'healthy' diet? Every kilogram lost is associated with a 16% reductio Continue reading >>

Take Steps To Prevent Type2diabetes

Take Steps To Prevent Type2diabetes

Diabetes (dy-ah-BEE-teez) is a leading cause of disability and death in the United States. Diabetes increases the risk of serious health problems like: The good news is that you can do a lot to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes, including: Next section Types of Diabetes 1 of 9 sections Diabetes means you have glucose (sugar) levels in your blood that are higher than usual. Your body depends on glucose for energy. When you eat, most of the food turns into glucose. Your blood carries the glucose to other parts of your body. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble turning glucose into energy. Instead of being used by your body, the glucose builds up in your blood and your body is starved of energy. Diabetes is a chronic (long-term) condition. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. People who are overweight are more likely to get type2diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a problem with the immune system (the system that helps fight infection). Right now, theres no way to prevent type 1 diabetes. Gestational (jes-TAY-shon-al) diabetes is a type of diabetes that some women develop during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of health problems for you and your baby. For example, gestational diabetes can make it more likely that youll develop type 2 diabetes after pregnancy. Next section Am I at Risk? Previous section Overview 2 of 9 sections You may be at risk for type 2 diabetes if you: Next section Cost and Insurance Previous section Symptoms 5 of 9 sections Under the Affordable Care Act , the health care reform law passed in 2010, insurance plans must cover: Diabetes screening for adults with high blood pressure Diet counseling for adults at higher risk for chronic disease Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get t Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Can I Lower My Risk?

Gestational Diabetes: Can I Lower My Risk?

As many as 9 out of every 100 pregnant women will develop a condition known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). It can put you at risk for problems during pregnancy and delivery. When you're pregnant, your cells become slightly more resistant to insulin. This causes the amount of glucose or sugar in your blood to rise. The extra sugar helps make more nutrients available to your baby. But if your cells become too resistant and the glucose can't into them, your blood sugar level becomes too high. It can cause problems for you and your growing baby. Although some things mean you're more likely to get it, you can steps to lower your risk. Who Gets It? No one can say for sure who will have gestational diabetes, but your chances go up if you: Are Hispanic, African-American, Native American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander Were overweight before your pregnancy Have a family member with diabetes Are age 25 or older Had gestational diabetes in an earlier pregnancy Had a very large baby (9 pounds or more) or a stillbirth Have had abnormal blood sugar tests before Talk to your doctor about how likely you are to get it and what symptoms to watch for. Diet Your doctor or a nutritionist can help you choose foods that may keep your blood glucose within a healthy range. They can also teach you about ideal portions and meal timing. In general, limit sweets and track how many carbohydrate-rich foods you eat. Include fiber in your meals. This can come from vegetables, fruits, whole-grain breads, whole-grain crackers, and cereals. One large study looked at diets of women before they got pregnant. Each daily increase in fiber by 10 grams reduced their risk of gestational diabetes by 26%. In addition to what you eat, taking fiber supplements may be helpful in helping you reach your f Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

5 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive: October 2009 Given the serious consequences emanating from insulin resistance and Type-2 diabetes, preventing this disease is certainly our best weapon in reducing the damage caused by a surplus of blood sugar. Luckily for us, the preventive potential is extraordinary: Adopting a healthy lifestyle can prevent up to 90 percent of Type-2 diabetes cases! To see how we can reduce the risk of diabetes, let us review some lifestyle factors. 1. Maintain a healthy body weight Given that excess weight and obesity are instrumental in the development of Type-2 diabetes, maintaining a normal body weight is an essential aspect of any preventive approach. The most spectacular illustration of how weight loss can influence the risk of diabetes is undoubtedly the effect of bariatric surgery (reducing stomach size) on morbidly obese people. Radically reducing the size of the stomach rapidly decreases obesity and almost completely eliminates Type-2 diabetes! However, it is neither necessary nor desirable to undergo this type of surgery to reap the benefits of weight loss: Losing just 5 kg, even over several years, can reduce the risk of diabetes by 50%! At a time when overweight has become the norm rather than the exception, Type-2 diabetes undoubtedly illustrates the dangers of excess weight and the need to be as slim as possible in order to prevent this disease. 2. Reduce intake of high-sugar foods You can also significantly reduce the risk of diabetes by paying particular attention to the amount and especially the type of carbohydrates: that is, the sugar in your diet. There are three main types of carbohydrates. ‘ The first is simple sugars ‘ like those in fruits, dairy products, maple syrup, or honey ‘ and sugars added to various products sold in grocery Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

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