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How Do Diabetics Keep Their Feet Warm

Weathering Diabetes: The Cold Can Impact Blood Sugar Levels And What To Do About It

Weathering Diabetes: The Cold Can Impact Blood Sugar Levels And What To Do About It

Diabetes is caused by difficulty producing or using insulin, the hormone responsible for regulating glucose. Diabetes sufferers are often very alert to their overall health, since self-management of the condition is so important. But did you know the weather can have a significant effect on blood glucose? It's true – cold weather can impact insulin needs. That's especially true of long, cold Illinois winters! When the temperature outside changes, review the facts about diabetes and body temperature so you can protect your health. Diabetes and Body Temperature For most of the year, insulin requirements tend to be more or less stable. Cold weather, however, can raise insulin needs. When warm weather comes on suddenly, by contrast, insulin demands might drop below the norm for a short time. Diabetes sufferers should be especially alert in peak winter and summer months. Extreme temperatures cause changes in the body that may lead to a drop or spike in blood sugar. During these times, testing blood glucose levels regularly is essential. Other steps you can take include: Keep Your Feet Warm, Dry and Safe Diabetes sufferers are prone to problems with their feet. Poor blood circulation can cause a number of secondary problems, and injuries to the feet may take a long time to heal. Always wear dry, sturdy shoes that will protect your feet from snow and ice. Maintain Regular Physical Activity Physical activity is a great way to support healthy insulin levels. Moderate exercise for even as little as 15 minutes can increase insulin sensitivity, sharpen your thoughts and improve your mood. Remember, activity can affect your blood glucose levels for up to 48 hours. Keep Your Hands Warm Sometimes, it's difficult to get an accurate blood sugar reading in the cold. Before taking a rea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health: Why Keeping Your Feet Toasty, Cozy, And Healthy This Winter Is Important

Diabetes Health: Why Keeping Your Feet Toasty, Cozy, And Healthy This Winter Is Important

Our talented and compassionate doctors all have clinical appointments at the Mt Sinai School of Medicine or are part of the Mt. Sinai Beth Israel Faculty practice. As the official podiatrists for the NYC Triathlon, Hamptons Marathon, Bridgehampton Half and NY Lizards, we know the needs and concerns of runners, triathletes, and other athletes. Dr. Geldwert is now seeing patients at Manhattan Orthopedic and Sports Medicine at 57 West 57th Street on Wednesdays between 8:30am and 12:30pm At the Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine, our only goal is to get you walking, running, biking, hiking, or whatever you enjoy- without pain. Diabetes Health: Why Keeping Your Feet Toasty, Cozy, And Healthy This Winter Is Important Posted by Jenn F. on Monday, December 2nd, 2013 With winter in full swing, its time to break out the warm, fuzzy socks and plush slippers. The chilly weatherrequires you to spend a little extra time on foot care, especially if you have diabetes. Common foot issues this time of year include: dry skin, wet feet, poor circulation and ill-fitting boots. The Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine in NYC offers five tips for diabetic foot care during December, January and February. Get ready to pamper your feet this winter. Image Source: RitualsBeauty.Blogspot.com This time of year, we see a lot of twisted ankles, tendon injuries and Mortons neuromas . Many of these winter blues can be alleviated by choosing the right type of winter boot. Generally speaking, footwear is more restrictive, especially if youre layering up on socks. Buying laced boots will give you a little more flexibility to loosen up. A good winter shoe should be relatively flat, waterproof, leave enough room to fit two pairs of socks, and have gripping soles to prevent falls, accordi Continue reading >>

All-important Tips For Winter Foot Care For Diabetics

All-important Tips For Winter Foot Care For Diabetics

All-Important Tips For Winter Foot Care For Diabetics During thelongwinter months, it is especially important for diabeticsto take certain steps to keep theirfeet healthy. Winter moisture, cold and dryness can easily cause numbness and decreased circulation, increasing the risk of a diabetes foot problem. To keep diabetic feet healthy through the winter and avoid problems, Dr. John Viscovich , a podiatrist with Westchester Health Orthopedics and Sports Medicine ,offers the following essential tips for proper foot care: People with diabetes need to have a daily protocol for foot inspection. Look carefully at all the pressure areas of your feet and between your toes. Inspect for any breaks in the skin, discharge, changes in color, changes in odor and/or painful corns or calluses. Let your doctor know about any changes you find. If you have diabetes, winter cold and dampness combined with decreased circulation in your feet can increase your risk for afoot ulcer. To combat this, make sure your winter shoes and boots provide warmth, protection from snow and ice, and proper padding. Wearwool socks, which provide cushioning protection and warmth. You might also consider wearing polypropylene stockings under your socks to wick away moisture. Moisture that collects between your socks, feet and between your toes for too long allows potentially problematic bacteria to gather. When your feet get wet from winter weather, you need to dry them carefully and completely, including between your toes. Inspect your feet for areas that are pale in color, which could mean they havent been thoroughly dried and still contain too much moisture. Also, its vital to change out of wet socks as soon as possible. Diabetes nerve damage and poor circulation can cause decreased function of the moisturi Continue reading >>

7 Winter Foot Care Tips For Diabetics | Footfiles

7 Winter Foot Care Tips For Diabetics | Footfiles

Tap Water Being Considered For Diabetic Foot Wound Cure (Really!) Cold winter temperatures combined with decreased circulation can leave patients with diabetes especially susceptible to foot ulcers and frostbite . Therefore, its important to choose cold weather shoes and boots that provide proper warmth, protection and dryness in rain, snow, sleet and ice. The shoes should have ample padding but be roomy enough so as not to restrict blood flow and circulation to the feet. Its also recommended that diabetics avoid man-made materials and other materials that create lots of foot sweat. Its important for diabetics to choose breathable socks that will keep their feet warm and dry. Its especially helpful to choose wool or moisture wicking socks to help control foot sweat that may create an extra chill. You can usually tell if your feet are being exposed to too much moisture by looking at them: Paleness and skin wrinkling are common signs of over-saturation. Diabetics should always do their best to avoid wintertime puddles, snow piles and anything else thatcan make their shoes and socks wet, but sometimes moisture is unavoidable. It may be a good idea to carry an extra pair of socks, as removing wet or damp socks and shoes as soon as possible can decrease the chance of infections and other irritating conditions from invading the feet. When the shoes do get wet, thoroughly dry them by placing them next toheateror be sure to wear a different, drypair the following day. If you do dry your shoes by a heater, make sure they're not too hot before placing them back on your feet. Diabetics with neuropathy may not be able to feel temperature, so its important to use caution when using warming devices like heating pads, electric blankets and heated massagers. Always use a thermometer o Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Warm Up Your Diabetes Management This Winter

8 Ways To Warm Up Your Diabetes Management This Winter

8 Ways to Warm Up Your Diabetes Management This Winter Dont let winter freeze out your diabetes management plan. Here's how to warm up your routine and keep your blood sugar in control all season. Winter brings much more than just shorter days, longer nights, and colder temperatures. The winter season can actually affect diabetes management. According to a study published in the November 2014 issue of Medicine , people with type 1 diabetes tended to have slightly higher A1C in the winter. While the same was not shown for people with type 2 diabetes in the study, its still a good idea to review your management plan as the temperature drops and adjust your daily routine to the weather. The way your lifestyle changes during winter has the biggest effect on diabetes management, says Michael McDermott, MD , a professor of medicine and director of the endocrinology and diabetes practice at the University of Colorado in Denver. Decreased activity levels top the list of concerns, he adds. When the weather gets cold, people spend less time being active outside and may lose motivation to exercise , too as well as eat more hearty and rich comfort foods. Exercise is the best defense against insulin resistance, says Joel Schnure, MD , medical director of endocrinology and diabetes at the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington and an associate professor at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. The combination of exercising less and eating more means you risk weight gain, he adds, and that can make diabetes control more challenging. Follow these tips to keep warm this winter while staying on top of your diabetes management plan: Wear warm socks and proper footwear. When dressing for cooler temperatures, pay particular attention to your feet . Make sure that they Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cold Feet

Diabetes And Cold Feet

We’ve all heard of a bride or groom “getting cold feet” before walking down the aisle, but for people with diabetes, having cold feet takes on another meaning entirely. What causes cold feet? Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a form of nerve damage, is one of the most common causes of cold feet. About sixty to seventy percent of people with diabetes develop some form of neuropathy over time. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is actually the cause of all kinds of symptoms, including tingling, burning, or sensitivity to touch. Your feet might seem warm to the touch, but feel cold to you. Symptoms may worsen at night. Poor circulation is another common cause of cold feet. Poor circulation makes it more challenging for your heart to pump warm blood to your extremities, keeping your feet cooler than the rest of your body. Peripheral artery disease, caused by clogged arteries in your legs, can reduce circulation and lead to cold feet. This could be a sign of something more serious, like increased risk for heart attack or stroke, but your doctor can usually detect it by checking the pulse in your legs. Certain medications, particularly those that cause blood vessels to constrict, can cause cold feet. Popular medications associated with cold feet are those to treat blood pressure, migraine headaches, and head colds. Talk to your pharmacist if you start to experience cold feet after starting a particular medication. Hypothyroidism is a condition caused by an underactive thyroid. Low levels of thyroid hormone interfere with your body’s metabolism, contributing to reduced circulation and colder feet. Other causes of cold feet Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a neurological disorder that causes funny sensations in your legs when at rest, such as creeping, crawling, aching—and, so Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? 10 Ways To Protect Your Feet!

Have Diabetes? 10 Ways To Protect Your Feet!

1. Manage Your Diabetes Partner with your health care team to set and reach goals for managing your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Develop a diabetes self-management plan with your health care team to include maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, monitoring blood sugar and taking medication as directed. Quit or don’t start smoking. Among a number of other serious health complications, smoking can decrease blood circulation to the feet. 2. Inspect Your Feet Daily Examine feet for cuts, sores, cracks, red spots and infected toenails every day. It’s possible you may have foot problems without feeling pain in your feet. Those that may have trouble seeing or reaching their feet can use a mirror or ask for the help of a doctor, family member or caregiver. Call your doctor if you notice pain or loss of feeling in your feet; changes in the shape of your feet or toes; and/or sores, cuts or ulcers on your feet that do not heal. 3. Wash Your Feet Daily Each day, wash your feet in lukewarm (not hot!) water. Be gentle with your feet by using a soft washcloth or sponge and a pumice stone where calluses tend to form. Dry feet by blotting or patting. Make sure to carefully dry between the toes. 4. Trim Toenails Regularly Trim toenails after washing and drying feet on a regular basis. If you can see, reach and feel your feet, trim toenails straight across. Do not cut toenails too short, as this could lead to ingrown toenails. Smooth corners with a nail file. If you can’t see, reach and feel your feet, ask for assistance from your doctor or caregiver. 5. Moisturize Your Feet Keep feet soft and smooth by applying a thin coat of moisturizing lotion or cream on the tops and bottoms of feet. To avoid fungal infection, do not apply lotion between toes. Instead, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Tips For Winter

Diabetic Foot Care Tips For Winter

Maintaining your exercise routine during winter is important to reducing the risk of diabetic foot ulcers. During the cold months, people with diabetes must pay special attention to their feet in order to ensure healthy function and reduce the risk of diabetic foot ulcers. Winter brings on additional risks to the feet – the cold can enhance numbness, exasperating the lack of feeling in the lower extremities caused by neuropathy. This can cause unsteadiness when walking that may lead to spills, increasing the risk of injury, and can make it difficult to realize when a sore or blister has developed. If left untreated, such wounds can become infected and, in severe cases, require amputation. With that in mind, diabetics should implement special measures to maintain the health of their feet during winter, such as with these simple tips: Keep your feet warm and dry Snowy conditions can lead to moisture in the shoes that can become a breeding ground for potentially harmful bacteria. Make sure your footwear is waterproof to keep your feet dry. Additionally, the cold can enhance numbness in the feet, a complication that already affects many people with this metabolic condition. Keep your feet toasty with the right socks: diabetic thermal socks are designed to keep your feet warm while absorbing moisture to defend against bacteria, and they’re made to improve blood flow through the extremities. Moisturize your feet While keeping your shoes dry to minimize bacteria is important, you should avoid allowing your feet to become too dry. “Dry winter heat, like sitting in the car with the heater blasting at your feet, can make dryness worse and lead to skin break-down,” Dr. Michael Shlonsky, a foot specialist at the Cleveland Clinic, told Everyday Health. “Watch out for red, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cold Feet: Prevention And Treatment Tips

Diabetes And Cold Feet: Prevention And Treatment Tips

Do you sometimes feel as though your feet are in the Arctic while the rest of you is in the Bahamas? The cold feet phenomenon is one of those strange side effects of diabetes that can definitely affect your quality of life. Understanding what causes it and how to treat it can go a long way toward making you more comfortable. What causes cold feet? For some, the thought of walking down the aisle causes cold feet; for those with diabetes, the issue isn't as quaint. "In most cases of patients with diabetes that complain of 'cold feet', it can be attributed to one of two causes, vascular insufficiency or diabetic neuropathy," said Gary F. Stones, DPM, President of the New York State Podiatric Medical Association. "I have found in my experience that it is often the latter, but may have a component of small vessel disease often seen in diabetics." Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, sometimes known as DPN, is one of the most common underlying problems that leads to cold feet. It can also lead to tingling, burning, sharp pains or cramps, sensitivity to touch or numbness of the feet. You feet might seem warm to the touch, but they feel cold to you. The symptoms might be much worse at night. Though it can be tempting to simply dunk your feet in warm or hot water, that's the last thing you should do. "Never soak your feet in hot water," Dr. Stones cautioned. "This can lead to thermal injury and in some cases have disastrous consequences, especially in someone with DPN and underlying vascular insufficiency." You should also avoid heating pads or hot water bottles, as these can cause burns. These home remedies might help you overcome the annoying feeling of ice-cold feet: Wear warm socks and shoes most of the time. Always wear warm socks to bed. Invest in an electric blanket and turn i Continue reading >>

Cold Feet And Toes: Symptoms & Signs

Cold Feet And Toes: Symptoms & Signs

Cold sensations to the feet can come from poor circulation, disorders of the nervous system, cold exposure injuries such as frostbite, and decreased metabolism from a low thyroid condition (hypothyroidism or underactive thyroid). Depending upon the cause of the symptoms, coldness in the feet can be accompanied by other symptoms, including pain, numbness, changes in skin color, or a pins and needles tingling sensation. Other diseases that can cause cold feet symptoms include diabetes, arteriosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, and neuropathy of any cause. In people with diabetes mellitus, chronic abnormally elevated blood and urine sugar, causes narrowing of arteries and capillaries that impair blood supply to tissues leading to cold feet symptoms. Arteriosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease result from chronic elevation of blood cholesterol levels that leads to blood vessel narrowing. Raynaud's phenomenon features narrowing of tiny blood vessels as a reaction to nerve sensitivity to cold exposure, which causes cold feet symptoms. Frostbite causes permanent damage to blood vessels that are injured from freezing of tissues. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Pictures, Images, Illustrations & Quizzes Continue reading >>

Cold Weather Tips For Diabetic Foot Care

Cold Weather Tips For Diabetic Foot Care

Foot and ankle surgeons urge patients to make adjustments for winter Chicago, October 31, 2016 -Anyone can have a foot problem. For people with diabetes, however, the possibility of incurring even a common foot issue can lead to infection or serious complications and even amputation. As a precaution, it is important for those with diabetes to take preventive measures, including making seasonal weather adjustments, according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). "With an already compromised system, patients with diabetes are prone to poor blood circulation and nerve disease in their extremities. As such, it is important they don't solely rely on their senses but instead make provisions based on factors, such as a change in climate, to help maintain healthy feet," said Michigan-based foot and ankle surgeon and ACFAS Fellow Member Michael Ambroziak, DPM, FACFAS. To help patients stay healthy, ACFAS provides the following five winter diabetic foot care safety tips. When it comes to your feet, rain, snow and slushy weather have something in common: they cause dampness. Moisture that collects between your socks and your feet and toes can form bacteria, which can lead to an infection. Patients with diabetes should change out of wet or damp socks, and towel dry their feet as soon as possible, remembering to pay close attention to the area between their toes. Use a moisturizer daily to keep dry skin from itching or cracking. But, don't moisturize between the toes-that could encourage a fungal infection. "Poor circulation associated with diabetes often decreases the moisturizing glands in patients' feet who are diabetic, leaving their feet more susceptible to severe dryness," said Dr. Ambroziak. Even everyday activities during colder weather, such as warmin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Feet

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Feet

For people with diabetes, foot complications such as neuropathy and circulation problems can make it difficult for wounds to heal. Serious problems can arise from common skin issues such as: sores cuts ulcers Diabetes that is not well controlled can lead to slower healing. These slow-to-heal wounds can lead to infections. Other foot issues, such as calluses, are also common in people with diabetes. While calluses may not seem worrisome, if left untrimmed they can turn into ulcers or open sores. People with diabetes are also at risk for Charcot joint, a condition in which a weight-bearing joint progressively degenerates, leading to bone loss and deformity. Because of nerve damage, people with diabetes may not immediately notice that there are problems with their feet. Over time, people with diabetic neuropathy can develop foot problems that cannot be healed, which can lead to amputations. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of lower-extremity amputations in the United States. Uncontrolled high blood sugar levels in people with poorly controlled diabetes can cause peripheral neuropathy, the medical term for numbness and loss of sensation due to damage to the nerves that serve the feet and hands. People with diabetic neuropathy cannot feel various sensations, such as pressure or touch, as intensely as those without damage to their nerves. On the other hand, peripheral neuropathy is often very painful, causing burning, tingling, or other painful feelings in the feet. If a wound is not felt right away, it can go unchecked. Poor circulation can make it difficult for the body to heal these wounds. Infection can then set in and become so serious that amputation becomes necessary. Checking the feet for abnormalities is a very important part of diabetes care. Abnormalities may Continue reading >>

Caring For Your Feet

Caring For Your Feet

When you have diabetes, your feet need extra-careful attention. That’s because diabetes places you at a higher risk of getting foot infections. There are several reasons for this, and they are all related to high blood glucose levels. First, high blood glucose is associated with damage to blood vessels, which can result in reduced circulation to the feet. If you get a cut or sore on your foot, decreased blood flow will slow the healing process. Second, high blood glucose can keep white blood cells from effectively fighting off an infection. In addition, many people with diabetes develop neuropathy, or nerve damage, in their feet. When nerves are damaged, the ability to sense heat, cold, pressure, and pain may be diminished. Often, changes in sensation in your feet occur over a long period without you even knowing it. You may experience a tingling, “pins and needles” feeling in your feet, or the nerves may become numbed and you may feel very little. When you lose feeling in your feet, you lose the ability to know when you have a sore, blister, or injury. This is called loss of protective sensation. When you don’t feel the pain, you’re less likely to treat the problem – and that could cause serious complications. Leaving a wound untreated can allow it to become infected, and the infection could become serious enough to require amputation. Unfortunately, diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations are on the rise. The financial and emotional costs of such losses are considerable. The good news is that if you pay attention to your foot health daily, you can do much to prevent the conditions that can lead to amputation. About three-fourths of all diabetes-related amputations are preceded by chronic foot ulcers. Therefore, a person with diabetes has a very good c Continue reading >>

Find The Right Diabetic Socks

Find The Right Diabetic Socks

Diabetes is a chronic illness that can require lifelong treatment and care. Many complications can occur, some of which affect the feet. If you have diabetes, you’re at risk of developing serious complications like foot infections. Not attending to diabetic foot care carefully and consistently can lead to amputation of the toes, feet, or even the entire leg below the knee. Practicing good foot care, such as choosing appropriate socks, is essential for preventing possible complications. People with diabetes are at risk for complications associated with having high blood sugar levels. One such complication is nerve damage (neuropathy). The most common type of neuropathy affects the nerves in the feet. Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include: numbness in the feet and toes sharp pains in the feet that are worse at night tingling or burning sensations in the feet muscle weakness foot deformities and ulcers If you have diabetic neuropathy and have lost feeling in your feet, it’s possible to get injured and never feel it. A pebble stuck in your shoe, for instance, may rub against your foot and cause a small ulcer. If you don’t check your feet for these injuries, they can get worse and become infected. Good diabetic foot care means checking your feet every day for injuries, blisters, and infections. It also means wearing footwear that helps prevent injuries. There are many different types of socks for people with diabetes. Generally, they’re designed to minimize foot injuries and keep feet dry and warm. Finding the right pair means selecting socks that best meet your needs. Here are some characteristics of diabetic socks: seamless: Socks with seams can rub against your skin and cause blisters or ulcers. Most diabetic socks are made without them moisture-wicking: Keeping Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Tips For The Winter

Diabetic Foot Care Tips For The Winter

Winter is a cold merciless season that forces us to turn up the heat, pull out the blankets in an attempt to keep all the warmth from getting sucked out of our bodies. For those who live with Diabetes, it is the most dreaded season of them all. Numbness and decreased circulation throughout the body is a common and dangerous side effect of winters frigid temperatures. In diabetic patients, this side effect is even more severe and leads to a higher risk of ending up in the hospital with foot ulcers or infections. With winter rearing its ugly head, it is time to take the appropriate steps towards proper diabetic foot care. Follow these tips to keep your feet healthy and infection free this season. Doctors advise patients with diabetes to give their feet a once-over every single day. But what are you looking for? Scan over your feet for any changes in color, breaks in the skin, and calluses. Your first sign of infection will be any discharge and changes in odor. Once youve given your feet a good and thorough inspection, take out any old socks youve worn and look for any stains. If you notice any differences in your feet, the first person you should call is your doctor. Proper diabetic foot care starts with the shoes you put on your feet. When preparing for the winter, be sure to buy winter boots or shoes that give you all around coverage. These shoes/boots should provide your feet with warmth, protection from water and snow, and have enough padding and room to keep your feet comfortable. Once youve found the perfect boots for the winter, wear woolsocks tokeep your feet warm. Even though snow boot and shoes are made to withstand the elements of winter, it is advised to steer clear of excessive amounts of puddles formed by melting snow. No matter how high-quality of a boot y Continue reading >>

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