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How Do Beets Affect Blood Sugar

For Better Blood Sugar, You Can’t Beat Beets

For Better Blood Sugar, You Can’t Beat Beets

If your blood sugar is too high and you’re fighting the battle of the bulge, there’s an easy way to enhance your insulin sensitivity and better regulate your blood sugar. Drink a long cool glass of beet juice before a meal. Background: The idea that drinking beet juice has a positive effect on general health is hardly new. Beet juice is rich in dietary nitrate, which the body uses to make nitric oxide, a compound that helps widen blood vessels, improving circulation. Drinking beetroot juice has been shown to reduce blood pressure, improve blood flow to the brain, improve athletic performance and even prevent altitude sickness. Improving circulation also helps the body deliver glucose to the tissues more efficiently so that the body needs to produce less insulin to metabolize food and control blood sugar. But obese people tend to have low nitric oxide levels. Could beets help boost their nitric oxide and improve their insulin sensitivity? To find out, researchers gave people beet juice and a large amount of sugar to digest. It’s a way to simulate the effects of a meal in a lab. Study: Twelve nonobese men and women and 10 obese men and women took part. Being obese is a significant risk factor for developing diabetes, although none of the participants actually had diabetes. They all were asked to not eat any nitrate-rich foods such as beets or greens the day before. They were also asked to not brush their teeth, floss or use mouthwash for 18 hours before the test. On the day of the study, they each drank a 17-ounce glass of beet juice and then were given a large amount of glucose sugar to consume. On another day, they rinsed with mouthwash—which prevents the body from turning beet’s nitrates into nitric oxide—before consuming the beet juice and sugar. It may se Continue reading >>

Is Beetroot Good For Diabetic Patients?

Is Beetroot Good For Diabetic Patients?

Have Excess Weight or Obesity? - Learn About a Treatment Option Learn More About a Once-Daily Medicine That Could Help You Lose Weight. Prescription treatment website Here I am going to tell you whether beetroot is good for diabetic patients or not! Diabetes is one of the common problems which is faced by a larger number of people nowadays. Are you one of them? Whether yes or no, it’s better to have a full study of it because you never know when you could be one of the diabetic patients. Are you one of them? Whether yes or no, it’s better to have a full study of it because you never know when you could be one of the diabetic patients. It is very important to eat healthy food daily to keep things under control. There are so many items which are healthy and equally useful for a diabetic patient. One must maintain a habit to include such items in their daily life so that you may never face much trouble due to diabetes. In this article, we are going to discuss on one of such food item i.e. Beetroot. It is nothing but the taproot portion of the beet plant. Apart from being used as a food item, it also has other uses like food coloring and medicines. Have Excess Weight or Obesity? - Learn About a Treatment Option Learn More About a Once-Daily Medicine That Could Help You Lose Weight. Prescription treatment website It is very nutritious and rich in various kinds of minerals and vitamins. This makes it one of the perfect items which should be in your regular diet. The beetroot is beneficial in cleansing your pancreas. Beetroot is also very beneficial for diabetes. It is highly recommended by doctors for a diabetic patient. It is also effective in getting pink lips naturally. If you are diabetic, then beetroot is one of the best items to be included in your diet.You can have Continue reading >>

Six Amazing Health Benefits Of Eating Beets

Six Amazing Health Benefits Of Eating Beets

Avoid New Year's Resolution FailureMake It a Lifestyle Resolution Instead Beet roots contain valuable nutrients that may help lower your blood pressure, fight cancer and inflammation, boost your stamina, and support detoxification Beet greens are equally, if not more, nutritious with nutrients that may strengthen your immune system, support brain and bone health, and more Beet roots have the highest sugar content of all vegetables, so they should be eaten in moderation Try adding beet roots raw to salads or as part of your vegetable juice; beet greens can be sauted with spinach or Swiss chard Beets are an ancient, prehistoric food that grew naturally along coastlines in North Africa, Asia, and Europe. Originally, it was the beet greens that were consumed; the sweet red beet root that most people think of as a "beet" today wasn't cultivated until the era of ancient Rome. 1 By the 19th century, however, the natural sweetness of beets came to be appreciated and beets began to be used as a source of sugar (reportedly, Napoleon was responsible for declaring that beets be used as a primary source of sugar after the British restricted access to sugar cane). 2 Today, sugar beets (unfortunately often genetically modified ) are a common raw material used for the production of sugar, but many people are missing out on including them in whole form in their regular diet. There's good reason to do so, in fact, as beets contain a variety of unique health-boosting nutrients that you may not be getting elsewhere. Plus, they're delicious! Beet roots have always been included in my most recommended vegetables list , although they are in the "use sparingly" category because of their high carbohydrate levels. Although beets have the highest sugar content of all vegetables, most people can Continue reading >>

Food Group Superfoods: Vegetables (part 5)

Food Group Superfoods: Vegetables (part 5)

Raise your hand if your mother told you to eat all your vegetables. And raise your hand if vegetables were your least favorite food on the plate. I remember my parents telling me I had to sit at the table until I ate all my broccoli. Of course I didn’t eat it, and after about 15 minutes my parents let me off the hook. Yet despite that, I went on to become a dietitian… Anyway, over the next two weeks, we’ll look at vegetables. (See last week’s entry for information about two “super fruits.”) Maybe you’ll be inspired to try a couple that you don’t usually eat or didn’t know how to prepare. Artichokes What they offer: Artichokes are related to the thistle plant and likely originated in the Mediterranean region. They were brought to the United States in the 19th century. The largest growers of artichokes are France, Spain, and Italy. Almost all of the artichokes in the United States are grown in California; in fact, Castroville, CA, has the only artichoke processing plant in the country and claims to be the “artichoke capital of the world.” There are several varieties of artichokes, ranging in color from dark purple to light green, with names such as Desert Globe, Big Heart, and Imperial Star. These vegetables are a great source of vitamin C, folate, magnesium, potassium, and fiber. As with most fruits and vegetables, artichokes also offer phytonutrients (plant-derived chemicals that may have health benefits), including cynarin (which helps with digestion) and silymarin (a compound that helps protect the liver and possibly protects against heart disease). And artichoke “lore” has it that these vegetables help aid in fertility, improve digestion, detoxify the liver and gallbladder, protect against liver cancer, and even help alleviate hangovers. Nut Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

Beets And Diabetes Type 2

Beets And Diabetes Type 2

When you are a diabetic, you have to be especially careful about your diet. While most vegetables are good for diabetics and are always a part of a healthy diabetes diet plan, certain root vegetables that are high in natural sugars can get left off the diet list for fear that they may cause a spike in blood sugar levels. Beetroot is a classic example of this. In fact, most people don’t know that beets and diabetes make a good combination! High in folate, vitamin C and alpha-lipoic acid , beets can be extremely beneficial for diabetics who suffer from nerve damage. According to Society for Biomedical Diabetes Research, alpha-lipoic acid seems to delay or reverse peripheral diabetic neuropathy through its multiple antioxidant properties. Studies have shown that drinking beet juice can heal nerve damage and treat both pain and numbness of hands and feet in diabetics. RELATED: 8 Top Research-Backed Diabetes Superfoods Beets And Diabetes: Why Is It Good For You? Beets are high in fiber, potassium, nitrate content, folate, and metabolites. While their glycemic index is 64, the natural sugars in beetroot don’t readily covert into glucose too quickly, so it doesn’t cause a spike in blood glucose levels. In fact, beetroot juice high in dietary nitrate improves cognitive function in diabetics when consumed consecutively for 14 days. In a study done by NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility and Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical School to study the effect of dietary nitrate on blood pressure, endothelial function, and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes, it was reported that dietary nitrate rich beetroot juice used for clinical trials improved cognitive function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Beets are exceptionally good Continue reading >>

Concurrent Beet Juice And Carbohydrate Ingestion: Influence On Glucose Tolerance In Obese And Nonobese Adults

Concurrent Beet Juice And Carbohydrate Ingestion: Influence On Glucose Tolerance In Obese And Nonobese Adults

Concurrent Beet Juice and Carbohydrate Ingestion: Influence on Glucose Tolerance in Obese and Nonobese Adults We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Concurrent Beet Juice and Carbohydrate Ingestion: Influence on Glucose Tolerance in Obese and Nonobese Adults Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, [...], and Christopher Bell Insulin resistance and obesity are characterized by low nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Insulin sensitivity is improved with stimulation of NO generating pathways. Consumption of dietary nitrate (NO3) increases NO formation, via NO3 reduction to nitrite (NO2) by oral bacteria. We hypothesized that acute dietary nitrate (beet juice) ingestion improves insulin sensitivity in obese but not in nonobese adults. 12 nonobese (body mass index: 26.3 0.8 kg/m2 (mean SE)) and 10 obese adults (34.0 0.8 kg/m2) ingested beet juice, supplemented with 25 g of glucose (carbohydrate load: 75 g), with and without prior use of antibacterial mouthwash to inhibit NO3 reduction to NO2. Blood glucose concentrations after beet juice and glucose ingestion were greater in obese compared with nonobese adults at 60 and 90 minutes (P = 0.004). Insulin sensitivity, as represented by the Matsuda Index (where higher values reflect greater insulin sensitivity), was lower in obese compared with nonobese adults (P = 0.009). Antibacterial mouthwash rinsing decreased insulin sensitivity in obese (5.7 0.7 versus 4.9 0.6) but not in nonobese Continue reading >>

Beetroot For Diabetes

Beetroot For Diabetes

Beetroot is a naturally occurring root vegetable that is commonly found in the temperate and tropical regions. It is also extremely low in calories, specifically 36 calories per 100 gm of beet. As a result, the juicy vegetable has been widely accepted at dining tables owing to its low calorie and high nutritive content. Small to moderate helpings of beet root are sufficient to provide all the vitamins, minerals, flavonoids, and fiber of the vegetable. The pigments, namely, betacyanins, account for the red color of sugar beets, and beta carotene is the antioxidant that is found in abundance in beetroot leaves. The root is also rich in vitamin C, fiber, and potassium. 1 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 2 3 Foods to Keep Out Is This Why Your Stomach Has Digestive Problems? nucific.com High in proteins, fiber, and essential nutrients, beetroot has a glycemic index of 64, which is in the medium range. Although the vegetable is high in naturally occurring sugars, the rate of its conversion to glucose is considerably low. This avoids any sudden surge of glucose levels in the blood stream. Beetroot is also considered effective in the reduction of hemocysteine, which can lead to chronic ailments in the heart and other organs. The presence of betaine in beetroot accounts for its high medicinal value. Betaine also helps in mitigating fatty deposits in the body. This ensures that the onset of type-2 diabetes can be allayed for those who regularly consume the red beet. Beetroot, in its raw form, is considered better for diabetic patients. This is due to its high level of natural sugars. Beetroot is included in a diabetes menu plan if it can be had in the form of salads during any meal. Beetroot is best eat Continue reading >>

Is Beetroot Good For Diabetics?

Is Beetroot Good For Diabetics?

If you or your loved one is suffering from diabetes, it is always important to be very cautious about what you eat. While many are wary about certain vegetables that are high on the glycemic index for the sheer fear of a rise in blood sugar, some of the nutritious vegetables also go off the diet list for the same reason. One such vegetable is beetroot. Here are 11 amazing benefits of beetroots. Since this vegetable is high in natural sugar content, many people stay away from consumption of beetroots if they suffer from diabetes. However, this vegetable is more beneficial to them for more than one reason. Here is why: Apart from having natural sugar they are also high in fibre, potassium and folate that are good for every individual including a diabetic. They have a glycemic score of 64 which isn’t too low, but when consumed the natural sugars don’t get converted into glucose too quickly. A study published in the journal Nitric Oxide Society pointed out that since beetroots are high in nitrate content, they also help to improve cognitive function in diabetic patients if consumed for a fortnight at a stretch [1]. Also, beetroot juice is a rich source of betalain and neo betanin, two nutrients that help to lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity and prevent oxidative stress-induced changes in patients with diabetes [2]. Here are six other ways in which beetroot juice can save your life. The best way to have it Studies indicate that beetroots give the best benefits to diabetics when had in the form of juice [1]. However, prefer to have it in the morning so it can convert into glucose slowly and steadily and provide you with the required energy throughout the day. Here are a list of foods that can help fight diabetes better. If you don’t wish to have the jui Continue reading >>

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

When you have diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Good blood sugar control can help prevent or slow the progression of some of the main medical complications of diabetes (1, 2). For this reason, avoiding or minimizing foods that cause big blood sugar spikes is essential. Despite being a healthy fruit, bananas are pretty high in both carbs and sugar, the main nutrients that raise blood sugar levels. So, should you be eating bananas if you have diabetes? How do they affect your blood sugar? If you have diabetes, being aware of the amount and type of carbs in your diet is important. This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar rises in non-diabetic people, the body produces insulin. It helps the body move sugar out of the blood and into the cells where it's used or stored. However, this process doesn't work as it should in diabetics. Instead, either the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the cells are resistant to the insulin that is made. If not managed properly, this can result in high-carb foods causing big blood sugar spikes or constantly high blood sugar levels, both of which are bad for your health. 93% of the calories in bananas come from carbs. These carbs are in the form of sugar, starch and fiber (3). A single medium-sized banana contains 14 grams of sugar and 6 grams of starch (3). Bananas are high in carbs, which cause blood sugar levels to rise more than other nutrients. In addition to starch and sugar, a medium-sized banana contains 3 grams of fiber. Everyone, including diabetics, should eat adequate amounts of dietary fiber due to its potential health benefits. However, fiber is especially important for p Continue reading >>

Glycemic Index & Beets

Glycemic Index & Beets

Beets can be a healthy vegetable despite a high Glycemic Index value. The Glycemic Index is a commonly used tool for determining the effect of carbohydrate-containing foods on blood glucose levels. Dieters and people with diabetes use the Glycemic Index because blood sugar levels can impact fat storage and the progression of diabetes. Although beets have a moderately high Glycemic Index value, there are other considerations you need to take into account before excluding these nutritious vegetables from your daily diet. The Glycemic Index is a rating system for carbohydrates that ranks foods based on how quickly and how high a given amount of food raise blood sugar levels. The scale goes from 0 to 100, with higher numbers having a greater influence on blood glucose levels. Foods that are high in simple sugars typically have high glycemic index ratings because these foods rapidly break down in the digestive tract and cause blood glucose levels to spike. Complex carbohydrates that are high in fiber tend to have a lower Glycemic Index rating and are better for blood sugar regulation. Beets are a root vegetable high in nutrients and phytochemicals. They contain high levels of folate, manganese and potassium and are a good source of fiber. Unfortunately, beets rate moderately high on the Glycemic Index, with a rating of 64. This indicates that the blood glucose response of 50 g of beet carbohydrates is about 64 percent of the response of pure glucose, which has a rating of 100 on the scale. The glycemic load is another measure that takes into account the actual amount of carbohydrates in a particular food instead of looking at the Glycemic Index alone. To calculate the glycemic load of a food, multiply the food's Glycemic Index score by the number of carbohydrates in grams p Continue reading >>

Are Beets Good For Diabetes?

Are Beets Good For Diabetes?

Use of the word "superfood" has grown in recent years. Many a vegetable has been given this title, often despite little evidence for the health benefits claimed for such foods. Could the humble beet qualify as a superfood? If the potential health benefits identified in a number of studies are confirmed in further research, the answer could be yes. Contents of this article: What are beets? Beets, also called beetroot, table beet, garden beet, and red beet, are one of several varieties of Beta vulgaris. Beets are grown for their edible root and leaves. Other cultivated varieties include the sugar beet, which has white flesh, and a leafy vegetable called chard. Beets are most often deep red in color. It is possible to obtain golden, white, and stripy red and white versions of the vegetable, however. They have been cultivated since the beginning of recorded history and were often used for medicinal purposes as well as for food. Medicinal uses included treating fevers, constipation, and skin complaints. The vegetable was also commonly used by the Romans as an aphrodisiac. Are beets good for people with diabetes? Lowering blood pressure Research has suggested that eating beets, or drinking beet juice, may benefit people with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a common condition among people with diabetes, and particularly those with type 2 diabetes. The blood pressure-lowering effect is thought to be caused by the presence of nitrates in beet juice. These nitrates improve the ability of blood vessels to widen, improving blood flow. In a recent study published in the journal Hypertension, researchers found that drinking a cup of beet juice each day was associated with a significant fall in blood pressure among people with high blood pressure levels. The study involved Continue reading >>

Beets: Use This To Lower Blood Sugar And Strengthen Your Heart

Beets: Use This To Lower Blood Sugar And Strengthen Your Heart

There are no miracle cure-alls, silver bullets, or magic pills that will get you trim, fit and healthy, but after an exhaustive search and rigorous testing , The Sherpa has pinpointed a few natural health therapies that DO help and ferreted out the scams to avoid...you may be shocked by what we've discovered. Beets: Use THIS to Lower Blood Sugar and Strengthen Your Heart Root vegetables have gotten a bad name. Sure, some of them (like potatoes for example) will send your blood sugar and insulin through the roof. But others actually have a fairly low net carb count (Ill explain what the is in a minute) which means they have almost zero effect on blood glucose and insulin levelswhich, as you know, is a very good thing if you want to burn fat and stay healthy. Not only that, but many of these buried treasures are packed with vitamins, minerals, and fiber that can protect you from a wide variety of chronic illnesses. In my book there is one root vegetable that wins the prize for underappreciated superfood of the year. Beets get their red color from a compound in them called betacyanin which is the messy stuff that stains your clothes and hands. According to Dr. Dharma Singh Khalsa2, betacyanin is a potent cancer fighter, a theory I havent been able to confirm though I did find a study that showed that it definitely did not promote cancer and for that reason alone would make an excellent alternative to red dye. Betacyanin also turns your urine red, so if you juice with beets, dont be alarmed, youre not bleeding internally! Okay, enough with the fun facts. Lets get down to business and talk about health benefits. An Ancient Liver Tonic and Blood Purifier In many holistic, integrative and Eastern traditions, beets are believed to be an excellent liver tonic and blood purifier Continue reading >>

Sugar Beets

Sugar Beets

Beets are a type of root vegetable with an appearance similar to red potatoes. A specific type of beet commonly called “sugar beet” is rich in sucrose and has been used as a source of refined table sugar for a few hundred years. The beets you are likely to buy at the grocery store are not as sweet because they contain much less sugar. Even sugar beets don’t contain much glucose, and all varieties contain lots of fiber, which tends to moderate blood glucose levels and prevent insulin spikes. Sugar beets, also known by the Latin name Beta vulgaris, became much more popular during the 19th century, when it was discovered they were a concentrated source of sucrose. Sucrose is a disaccharide sugar made up of one molecule of fructose and one molecule of glucose. Sucrose is readily digested by your body and quickly impacts blood glucose levels and stimulates the release of insulin from the pancreas. Insulin is needed to shuttle the glucose from the blood and into cells for fuel. Thus, sugar beets contain hardly any glucose, but the sucrose content is quickly metabolized into glucose. Regular Beets Another variety of Beta vulgaris is typically eaten as a vegetable in the United States. These regular beets are much lower in sugar, but they contain many other nutrients in abundance. For example, beets are rich in folate and manganese, as well as very good sources of potassium and dietary fiber. In fact, 1 cup of raw beets provides about 15 percent of the recommended amount of daily fiber for most adults Approximately 28 percent of the dietary fiber is soluble and the remainder is insoluble. High-fiber foods tend to have a beneficial impact on blood glucose levels. Fiber and Blood Glucose Soluble fiber, particular when eaten in large amounts, can lower or at least moderate b Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

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