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How Diabetes Starts

Signs & Symptoms

Signs & Symptoms

There are many signs and symptoms that can indicate diabetes. Signs and symptoms can include the following: Unusual thirst Frequent urination Weight change (gain or loss) Extreme fatigue or lack of energy Blurred vision Frequent or recurring infections Cuts and bruises that are slow to heal Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Trouble getting or maintaining an erection If you have any of these symptoms, it is important to contact your health-care provider right away. Even if you don’t have symptoms, if you are 40 or older, you should still get checked. It is important to recognize, however, that many people who have type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. We respond to more than 20,000 requests per year by phone, email, and online chat. We are here to help give you the information and support you need so don't hesitate to contact us today. Contact Us Symptoms of diabetes in children Diabetes affects children of all ages. Most children who develop diabetes do not have a family history of diabetes. Symptoms of diabetes in your child could include: Drinking and going to the bathroom more frequently than usual Starting to wet the bed again Lack of energy If you think your child might have diabetes, see a doctor today. Diagnosis of diabetes Speak with your doctor and ask him or her to test you for diabetes using one of the following tests. The amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is measured in mmol/L. Fasting blood glucose You must not eat or drink anything except water for at least eight hours before this test. A test result of 7.0 mmol/L or greater indicates diabetes. Random blood glucose This test may be done at any time, regardless of when you last ate. A test result of 11.0 mmol/L or greater, plus symptoms of diabetes, indicates diabetes. A1C This test may b Continue reading >>

When Does Diabetes Really Start?

When Does Diabetes Really Start?

For most of my professional life, a diagnosis of diabetes was made when the fasting blood glucose exceeded 140 mg/dL. In 1998, a consensus committee, based on an extensive review of data, changed that to 126 mg/dL. A normal fasting blood glucose was now 100 mg/dL. A glucose between those values is now impaired fasting glucose. Similarly, glucose 2 hours after a meal or glucose load should be 140 mg/dL. A postprandial value becomes diabetes when it exceeds 200 mg/dL. Between 140 and 199 is impaired glucose tolerance. A more convenient way to look at it is the HbA1c test, a reflection of the mean blood glucose over 90 days. It took many years, but now norms have been established and the A1c may be used for screening and diagnosis. Normal is less than 5.7%, prediabetes is between 5.7% and 6.5%, and clinical diabetes is over 6.5%. It gets confusing when the numbers are at the edge of diagnosis. For example, if someone has a fasting glucose of 127, they are considered diabetic, but at 125 they are prediabetic. That's why I believe it is best to look at all of this as a single disease starting at birth or even in utero. What we are really interested in is RISK, especially risk for complications. At the different points on the line of progression, when does risk begin and when do we intervene? This is salient for the following reason. Studies have shown that risk for complications begins to progress slightly at different levels of glucose. Therefore, a blood glucose of 90 has more risk than a blood glucose of 70. With this limited tutorial in mind, we now face what is truly a major problem. Prediabetes is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Over a period of time, this is progressive while the blood glucose finally reaches criteria for diagnosing diabetes Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

I haven't experienced any symptoms of diabetes in the past, but just in the last week or so, I have seen a dramatic increase in my urination frequency: I have to go about once an hour. And I seem to be constantly thirsty. Is it possible that symptoms of diabetes could materialize virtually overnight? Continue reading >>

History Of Diabetes

History Of Diabetes

Frederick Banting (right) joined by Charles Best in office, 1924 Diabetes is one of the first diseases described[1] with an Egyptian manuscript from c. 1500 BCE mentioning “too great emptying of the urine.”[2] The first described cases are believed to be of type 1 diabetes.[2] Indian physicians around the same time identified the disease and classified it as madhumeha or honey urine noting that the urine would attract ants.[2] The term "diabetes" or "to pass through" was first used in 250 BC by the Greek Apollonius of Memphis.[2] Type 1 and type 2 diabetes were identified as separate conditions for the first time by the Indian physicians Sushruta and Charaka in 400-500 CE with type 1 associated with youth and type 2 with obesity.[2] The term "mellitus" or "from honey" was added by Thomas Willis in the late 1600s to separate the condition from diabetes insipidus which is also associated with frequent urination.[2] Further history[edit] Plaque in Strasbourg commemorating the 1889 discovery by Minkowski and Von Mering The first complete clinical description of diabetes was given by the Ancient Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia (fl. 1st century CE), who also noted the excessive amount of urine which passed through the kidneys.”[3] Diabetes mellitus appears to have been a death sentence in the ancient era. Hippocrates makes no mention of it, which may indicate that he felt the disease was incurable. Aretaeus did attempt to treat it but could not give a good prognosis; he commented that "life (with diabetes) is short, disgusting and painful."[4] The disease must have been rare during the time of the Roman empire with Galen commenting that he had only seen two cases during his career.[2] In medieval Persia, Avicenna (980–1037) provided a detailed account on diabet Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy. With type 1 diabetes, beta cells produce little or no insulin. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream instead of going into the cells. This buildup of glucose in the blood is called hyperglycemia. The body is unable to use the glucose for energy. This leads to the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Most likely, it is an autoimmune disorder. This is a condition that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue. With type 1 diabetes, an infection or another trigger causes the body to mistakenly attack the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, can be passed down through families. Continue reading >>

Stop Diabetes Before It Starts

Stop Diabetes Before It Starts

VIDEO: Watch Chef Daniel Thomas prepare nutritious foods that are healthy for people with pre-diabetes, including delicious ways to add more beans to your diet. What is prediabetes? Let’s start with what prediabetes is not. It’s not a disease, and it has no obvious symptoms. So why should you care? Because prediabetes indicates high blood sugar, just not high enough to be type 2 diabetes — yet. It’s an indication that you’re on the path to diabetes unless you alter your eating and fitness habits. The important message: You can probably fix the problem if you take the right steps. Who is at risk? The biggest risk factors are obesity and a sedentary lifestyle, says Gregg Simonson, director of professional training and consulting at the International Diabetes Center in St. Louis Park, Minn. Genetics is important as well: Even lean folks who have a strong family history of diabetes can get prediabetes. The American Diabetes Association offers a test that assesses your risk. Why does prediabetes risk increase around age 45? The cells of your body require insulin to absorb glucose, which they need in order to function. If you’re younger and you suffer from insulin resistance (a condition in which your cells have a harder time absorbing glucose), your more vigorous pancreas can usually compensate for the problem by manufacturing more insulin. But your pancreas becomes less effective with age, explains dietitian Hillary Wright, director for nutrition counseling for the Domar Center for Mind/Body Health in Waltham, Mass. That could cause more glucose to accumulate in the bloodstream. What are the obvious symptoms of prediabetes? There aren’t any. And even though roughly 1 in 3 American adults have prediabetes, 90 percent of those people don’t know it, according t Continue reading >>

If I Start Consuming Honey And Fruits For My Daily Sugar Intake Instead Of Table Sugar, Will I Still Get Diabetes?

If I Start Consuming Honey And Fruits For My Daily Sugar Intake Instead Of Table Sugar, Will I Still Get Diabetes?

Just bare in mind that too much of anything is bad. If you consume honey and fruits as your an alternative to your daily table sugar, than that's okay. But remember that many of the foods we eat have carbohydrates, many if not all, contains glucose which is a sugar. Be wary of the food choices you have for Diabetes is rampant in this modern age. If you know somebody who have Diabetes, this might help them. Neither taking honey or table sugar will cause you to get diabetes. Diabetes is a situation when your body is unable to lower its blood sugar when it gets high. Why it is unable to is due to a poor lifestyle that leads to this inability. One theory, as explained by Ray Peat, is the presence of free fatty acids (specifically polyunsaturated fatty acids) that inhibit our body from using glucose. It is mainly due to consuming oils that are not saturated. These PUFAs (polyunsaturated fats) include soya oil, corn oil, and canola oil, and fish oil, the supposedly "healthy oils" as we have been led to believe. The effects of these oils on the body are many-fold, and one effect is the inability of our body to utilize blood sugar for energy. Unused blood sugar keeps blood sugar high. However, honey is very high in fructose, which when present in blood sugar, still overcomes the effect of PUFAs, and still gets used or metabolized by the body. The same applies to fresh fruits and root vegetables, which are high in fructose. I would favor honey over table sugar, as honey in my experience does not produce an insulin response in me. Table sugar seems to produce that response in me, and I find myself hungry or sleepy after a while, as a result of the lower blood sugar in my body due to the insulin response. That said, I am not sure why table sugar does that, as table sugar is compos Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2 diabetes and typically affects younger individuals. Type 1 diabetes usually begins before age 40, although there have been people diagnosed at an older age. In the United States, the peak age at diagnosis is around 14. Type 1 diabetes is associated with deficiency (or lack) of insulin. It is not known why, but the pancreatic islet cells quit producing insulin in the quantities needed to maintain a normal blood glucose level. Without sufficient insulin, the blood glucose rises to levels which can cause some of the common symptoms of hyperglycemia. These individuals seek medical help when these symptoms arise, but they often will experience weight loss developing over several days associated with the onset of their diabetes. The onset of these first symptoms may be fairly abrupt or more gradual. To learn more about type 1 diabetes basics, see our type 1 diabetes slideshow. It has been estimated that the yearly incidence of type 1 diabetes developing is 3.7 to 20 per 100,000. More than 700,000 Americans have this type of diabetes. This is about 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes; the other 90% have type 2 diabetes. What You Need to Know about Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Causes Type 1 diabetes usually develops due to an autoimmune disorder. This is when the body's immune system behaves inappropriately and starts seeing one of its own tissues as foreign. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the islet cells of the pancreas that produce insulin are seen as the "enemy" by mistake. The body then creates antibodies to fight the "foreign" tissue and destroys the islet cells' ability to produce insulin. The lack of sufficient insulin thereby results in diabetes. It is unknown why this autoimmune diabetes develops. Most often Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Start A Ketogenic Diet As A Type 1 Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Start A Ketogenic Diet As A Type 1 Diabetes?

The answer depends entirely on two factors: 1) How proficient are you at managing your T1 diabetes? Unless you are extremely good at managing your blood sugars (pre-meal bolus, post-meal bolus, many sugar checks per day, great understanding when you’re low or high, know exactly the influence of certain foods, exercise, sleep, etc.) then I would not recommend trying this. It simply would not be safe. If you manage your condition in a manner as precise and perfect as this sand and rock…it might be worth a shot (no pun intended). 2) Your doctors willingness to try this with you. You will need to be in contact with your doctor on a daily basis and then weekly as you become comfortable with the changes. Frankly, you should have his personal cell number. He will need to closely monitor your sugars and ketones and make frequent adjustments to your basal rate/dose (not sure if you’re on a pump) and ratios. One of my businesses (Epibolics.com) specializes in insulin resistance. One way we reverse insulin resistance is by using a ketogenic diet. We have used this approach with both T1 and T2 patients in the past with success. Again, it takes constant professional monitoring and an extremely proficient individual. A T1 + Keto Story A few years ago we had a T1 triathlon athlete. Since the ketogenic diet is all the rage in the endurance field (burning fat gives serious performance advantages over relying on carbs), he wanted in! We worked with him closely and had him down to a small basal dose of lantus per day. He rarely needed to cover meals. Again…he was absolutely dedicated to this plan and took it very seriously. Without both, this would never have worked. His performance went through the roof. I hope this helps! Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information

Diabetes Information

Almost 30 million people in the United States have diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease, usually occurs in people who are 45 years of age or older. However, the rate of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is increasing. Common Diabetes Terms (American Diabetes Association) Diabetes Can Be Silent | Definition of Diabetes | Warning Signs of Diabetes | Type 1 Diabetes | Type 2 Diabetes | Gestational Diabetes | Complications of Diabetes Diabetes can go silently undetected for a long time without symptoms. Many people first become aware that they have diabetes when they develop one of its potentially life-threatening complications, such as heart disease, blindness or nerve disease. Fortunately, diabetes can be managed with proper care. Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) condition that can have serious consequences. However, with careful attention to your blood sugar control, lifestyle modifications and medications, you can manage your diabetes and may avoid many of the problems associated with the disease. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) can help you make the transition of managing your disease easier. Back to top Definition of Diabetes Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. The cause of diabetes is a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise appear to play roles. There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 Type 2 Gestational Diabetes Back to top Warning Signs of Diabetes Frequent urination Unusual thirst Extreme hunger Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Sometimes pregnancy causes the blood sugar to rise in women who do not have diabetes. This is called gestational diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. For further information about diabetes, see separate leaflets called Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Sometimes pregnancy causes the blood sugar to rise in women who do not have diabetes. This is called gestational diabetes (see below). How does pregnancy affect diabetes? How does pregnancy affect diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Pregnancy makes the body need more insulin to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in the body. Therefore, women with diabetes usually need more treatments to control their blood sugar when t Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and urination increased hunger fatigue blurred vision numbness or tingling in the feet or hands sores that do not heal unexplained weight loss Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can start quickly, in a matter of weeks. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Some people do not find out they have the disease until they have diabetes-related health problems, such as blurred vision or heart trouble. What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease. Studies such as TrialNet are working to pinpoint causes of type 1 diabetes and possible ways to prevent or slow the disease. What causes type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes. Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, check out these Body Mass Index (BMI) charts. Insulin resistance Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resista Continue reading >>

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