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How Diabetes Medications Work

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How Does Metformin Work?

Metformin is a type of oral medication used to treat type 2 diabetes — and according to Gary Scheiner, CDE, in his book, “Until There is a Cure,” metformin is the most prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes, and one of those most widely used drugs in the world. But type 1 diabetics can take metformin, too, explains Scheiner, if they’re struggling with insulin resistance and persistent high blood sugars. The brand names for metformin are Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Fortamet, and Riomet. Metformin has also been combined with other medications, giving you two diabetes treatment methods in one medication. Those combo-medications are: glyburide (Glucovance), glipizide (Metaglip), rosiglitazone (Avandamet), pioglitazone (Actoplus Met), sitagliptin (Janumet) and repaglinide (PrandiMet). [Download our free Guide to Type 2 Diabetes Medications] Metformin is taken in pill-form. It is generally taken twice per day, at breakfast and at dinner. For those with higher levels of insulin resistance, your doctor may prescribe metformin to be taken at all three meals: breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Benefits of Metformin: While there are a variety of oral medications to help people Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. classicdame

    Since the medication administration is a medically delegated act it is not up to the nurse to determine when a med is given, so I do not understand the question. Long-acting (basal) insulins work over 18-24 hours and are meant to keep the overall BS under control. They are not meant to treat an acute high BS. Short acting are the opposite. They are meant to treat an acute high BS, such as what you would expect following a meal consumption.
    My basal insulin is generally prescribed once daily, but I split the dose and inject twice daily for better coverage (with MD approval). There is so much to know about insulin, and so many types, that I can only recommend you google for a chart on the peaks and actions of all of them.

  2. healthstar

    Quote from classicdame
    Since the medication administration is a medically delegated act it is not up to the nurse to determine when a med is given, so I do not understand the question. Long-acting (basal) insulins work over 18-24 hours and are meant to keep the overall BS under control. They are not meant to treat an acute high BS. Short acting are the opposite. They are meant to treat an acute high BS, such as what you would expect following a meal consumption.
    My basal insulin is generally prescribed once daily, but I split the dose and inject twice daily for better coverage (with MD approval). There is so much to know about insulin, and so many types, that I can only recommend you google for a chart on the peaks and actions of all of them. I know that it is not up to the nurse to determine when the medication is given.
    Thank you for the answering my question, this is what I was looking for.

  3. JPORCH

    The answer is going to vary depending on the patient because the dosages and times are going to be different depending on the individual patients needs. For ex. Lantus is a long acting basal insulin which is usually given in one dose at bedtime and lasts up to 24 hours. But sometime you will see the dose given in the morning or sometimes even split and given in the morning and before bedtime. Again it just depends. As for Humalog/Novolog short acting insulin it is given as a bolus at meal times (covering carbohydrate intake) and as a correction when the blood glucose levels are high. Hope this helps.

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