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How Diabetes Kills You

Can Having Diabetes Kill You? – When Does Diabetes Kill

Can Having Diabetes Kill You? – When Does Diabetes Kill

When Does Diabetes Kill However, your risk, just for having diabetes, is very high. Diabetes, facts and figures of the telegraph. Can you reverse type 2 diabetes? Self-management of diabetes So what is the decrease in body weight between 5 and 10? How can high blood sugar levels hurt people with diabetes? How does it kill you? Fandom driven by having can hiccups on a daily basis. Written by that will help you avoid it, or prevent it from getting worse if you've already done it. Daily mail How long does it take for diabetes to kill you if it is not treated? Diabetes. Diabetes what you do not know can kill hypoglycaemia and "insulin shock" type diabetes that is not yet medicated. Diabetes discusses topic 3 10278. Column of advice on diabetes when neuropathy can stop your heart's responses. If left untreated, diabetes can cause blindness, heart disease, stroke, nerve damage (which can sometimes cause ulcers and even amputation of limbs), kidney failure on February 24, 2016. When you are diagnosed with diabetes, you You will ask, is this going to kill? I? How long do I live this? & # 39; Fortunately, the answers say that on June 6, 2012 are progressive chronicles, it's like having a curse. The husband (55) has just been diagnosed with adult-onset diabetes; he commits suicide; Or do you want a partner to take care of himself so he can be close to your relationship and want help to overcome it on December 19, 2016 to know if type 1 is more serious than 2 why? The type 1 diabetes is the most serious the telegraph of facts and figures. Complications of diabetes netwellness. Severe hypoglycaemia (a reading from the meter) can send you to a coma and very few people die just because of losses on May 9, 2015 ask if neuropathy kills. On June 5, 2008 you will not develop any diabetic Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

Foot Infection: The Diabetes Complication That Kills More People Than Most Cancers

Foot Infection: The Diabetes Complication That Kills More People Than Most Cancers

A foot or leg amputation is one of the most dreaded complications of diabetes. In the US, more than 65,000 such amputations occur each year. But the tragedy does not stop there. According to recent research, about half of all people who have a foot amputation die within five years of the surgery—a worse mortality rate than most cancers. That’s partly because diabetic patients who have amputations often have poorer glycemic control and more complications such as kidney disease. Amputation also can lead to increased pressure on the remaining limb and the possibility of new ulcers and infections. Latest development: To combat the increasingly widespread problem of foot infections and amputations, new guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infections have been created by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). What you need to know… Diabetes can lead to foot infections in two main ways—peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage that can cause loss of sensation in the feet)…and ischemia (inadequate blood flow). To understand why these conditions can be so dangerous, think back to the last time you had a pebble inside your shoe. How long did it take before the irritation became unbearable? Individuals with peripheral neuropathy and ischemia usually don’t feel any pain in their feet. Without pain, the pebble will stay in the shoe and eventually cause a sore on the sole of the foot. Similarly, people with diabetes will not feel the rub of an ill-fitting shoe or the pressure of standing on one foot too long, so they are at risk of developing pressure sores or blisters. These small wounds can lead to big trouble. About 25% of people with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer—ranging from mild to severe—at some point in their lives. Any ulcer, Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

If you have ever asked the question “What is diabetes, exactly?”, then you have come to the right place. Diabetes is a illness that relates to problems with the hormone insulin. When functioning correctly, the pancreas releases insulin which then lets the body retain or utilize sugars and fats taken in through the food we eat. Diabetes occurs when: No insulin is produced Insufficient amounts of insulin is produced The body does not react to insulin in the correct way, a disorder known as “insulin resistance” Suitable management regarding the disease is needed after a individual has been diagnosed with diabetes. Generally three types of diabetes is referred to, namely: Type 1 Diabetes: This is when the beta cells (Insulin-producing cells) are killed by the body’s immune system. As a result the body does not produce any insulin. Subsequently insulin injections must be used to regulate the blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes may occur from as early as the age of 20 and makes up roughly 10% of all people suffering from diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes: In this case the pancreas does produce insulin, but it is either an inadequate amount or the body is resistant to it. Both of these cases result in glucose not being able to enter the body’s cells. It is most commonly found in people who are overweight and usually older than 40 years of age. There are however instances of type 2 diabetes where this is not the case, and these instances are rising due to the increase in child obesity. Usually type 2 diabetes is controlled by making healthy lifestyle choices. Sometimes medication is used in addition to a healthy way of living. Pre-Diabetes is when a individual has higher blood sugar levels than normal, but not yet as high as type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes can develop into ty Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education website. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes. It means that your body can't make insulin. Insulin helps your body use the sugar it makes from the food you eat. Your body uses this sugar for energy. We need insulin to live. Without insulin, your blood sugar level goes up, you get thirsty and you urinate a lot. What problems can type 1 diabetes cause? People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to get heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, high blood pressure, blindness, nerve damage and gum disease. These things happen two to four times more often in people with diabetes than in people without diabetes. When you have type 1 diabetes, blood may not move as well through your legs and feet. If left untreated, this might lead to amputation of your feet. Untreated type 1 diabetes can cause coma. It can even kill you. The good news is that treatment can help you prevent these problems. How can these problems be prevented? To help prevent these problems, keep your blood sugar under tight control, eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, don't smoke and keep your blood pressure and cholesterol levels low. If you do all of these things, your risk of complications can be cut by more than 75 percent. How do I keep my blood sugar under tight control? Insulin helps people with type 1 diabetes keep the level of sugar in their blood at a normal level. Many people with type 1 diabetes take short-acting insulin before each meal. You Continue reading >>

How Does Alzheimer's Disease Kill You?

How Does Alzheimer's Disease Kill You?

From media reports, ex-Tennessee Women’s Basketball coach Pat Summitt’s final days were difficult, but she did not lack for support. According to The Associated Press, dozens of Summitt's former Tennessee players and coaches came to Knoxville over the weekend to say their final goodbyes to the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history. Summitt, 64, died Tuesday morning, five years after being diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. While her death was reported as a result of the disease, Alzheimer’s in and of itself does not kill a person. Yet last year nearly 100,000 people in the United States died because of it. Here’s a look at how Alzheimer’s kills. How does Alzheimer’s lead to a person’s death? Alzheimer’s disease destroys nerve connections in the brain, making it progressively more difficult to do ordinary things like move around, swallow and feed yourself. While the disease devastates the brain, it does not kill you. Complications of the decline in brain function is what leads to death. Not being able to swallow properly is particularly dangerous. The vast majority of those with Alzheimer’s die from aspiration pneumonia – when food or liquid go down the windpipe instead of the esophagus, causing damage or infection in the lungs that develops into pneumonia. Which complications of Alzheimer’s are most likely to kill you? Aspiration pneumonia Bedsores Sepsis infections from undiagnosed urinary tract infections Infections in general Injuries from falls Malnutrition and dehydration What happens to the brain of a person who has Alzheimer’s? Alzheimer’s causes the brain to decline in complicated ways. The changes in brain function happens when abnormal deposits of proteins form amyloid plaques (clusters of protein fr Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Early Diabetes: Five Risk Factors Putting You On Course For Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Early Diabetes: Five Risk Factors Putting You On Course For Type 2 Diabetes

Prediabetes is also referred to by medics as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which is treatable but not easily reversed. Experts said it is a ‘critical stage’ in the development of diabetes because lifestyle choices - such as changing diet and exercising - can return blood sugar levels to normal. It is therefore crucial to recognise it as early as possible, medics argue. The condition is considered to be a grey area between having normal blood sugar levels and those verging on diabetic levels. Diabetes.co.uk states : “Prediabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes. “Prediabetes may be referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels after a period of fasting, or as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels following eating. “Each year in the UK, 5 to 10 per cent of people diagnosed with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes.” There are no clear symptoms of prediabetes, so people could be suffering with the condition without knowing it. However people with prediabetes might be suffering with similar symptoms to type 2 diabetes. These include urinating more frequently, feeling thirsty and feeling tired. Symptoms can also include itching around the penis or vagina as a result of thrush, cuts or wounds which heal slowly and blurred vision. Being overweight can also cause type 2 diabetes. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The Continue reading >>

8 Things I Wish People Understood About Having Type 1 Diabetes

8 Things I Wish People Understood About Having Type 1 Diabetes

I was 25 and in the middle of my second year of law school when I started feeling tired, thirsty, and hungry. I had blurry vision all the time. I was lucky — I mentioned this to a friend, and she said whenever she complained about her eyes her dad tested her blood sugar, because that's how he got diagnosed with diabetes. I had a family history of both types, but I figured I was too old for Type 1 and too young and too much of a gym rat for Type 2. Still, I went to student health. I explained my typical diabetes symptoms and family history to a person we will call "Helpful Nurse." Helpful Nurse decided the best immediate course of action would be to gaslight me aggressively in the five minutes it took to get the results back on my sugar test. "We don't usually get people in here 'thinking' they have 'diabetes.'" Cool story. "See, your vision isn't that bad." It's usually 20/19. "I'm sure you're just stressed about finals." Yeah, especially since I've spent most of the semester unconscious. That's when we heard someone scream from the lab down the hall and around a corner, "Don't let her leave." The equipment in student health had a limited range. My test didn't generate a number. It just said "high." "High" means it was at least six times normal. No, my life isn't over. It's a pain in the ass, it's terrifying, but the treatments will on average get me through the day. I was waiting for a friend to take me to the ER when Helpful Nurse started talking about high- risk pregnancy and "not dying the way my grandmother died." Pregnancy? I have exams in a month. And I watched my T1 grandmother die. Thanks, Helpful Nurse, you can go now. Of course this was a Friday. I spent the weekend eating nothing but tofu and zucchini with my sugar camped at three or four times normal, and Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Your Brain

How Diabetes Affects Your Brain

Diabetes can have an impact on your whole body. Your brain is no exception. Recent studies have linked type 2 diabetes to a slowdown in mental functioning and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The chance of brain complications is just one more reason to keep your diabetes under control. Diabetes on the Brain Scientists are still unsure exactly how type 2 diabetes might affect the brain. However, multiple factors are probably involved. On top of tracking your diet and blood sugar, regular exercise is a key part of managing your diabetes. And while any exercise is better than none, certain activities have specific benefits for people with diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. “High blood sugar may directly affect either nerve cells or support cells in the nervous system,” says Alan Jacobson, M.D., emeritus professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “It can also lead to damage in both large and small blood vessels.” This, in turn, reduces the amount of oxygen reaching the brain. Plus, it increases the risk of having a stroke, which can kill brain cells. In addition, type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, in which fat, muscle, and liver cells aren’t able to use insulin effectively. At first, the pancreas responds by pumping out more insulin. The same enzyme that breaks down insulin also breaks down a protein called beta-amyloid, which builds up abnormally in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. With so much of the enzyme at work breaking down insulin, beta-amyloid might have more chance to accumulate. Effect on Mental Continue reading >>

This Is How Diabetes Kills You

This Is How Diabetes Kills You

People with diabetes cannot properly metabolize glucose. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas are defective and do not produce insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the body becomes insensitive to the insulin that is successfully produced. Though type 1 diabetes results from faulty DNA and type 2 diabetes comes from poor lifestyle choices, they both result in the same thing: wildly volatile glucose levels. This in itself is detrimental to the body. Too much glucose, called hyperglycemia, can lead to coma or death. Too little glucose, called hypoglycemia, can essentially fry the brain by depriving it of ‘fuel.’ Both scenarios are indeed traumatic but are not the primary cause of death among diabetes patients. In fact, secondary complications of diabetes cause the most death among diabetes patients. The Damaging Effects of Secondary Complications of Diabetes Though hyper- and hypoglycemia are indeed dangerous, they are not the primary causes of death among people with diabetes. Heart disease is the main cause of increased death rates among diabetics Not only is it the greatest killer of diabetics, but it also develops much earlier in diabetics than people without diabetes. Heart disease comes as a result of compromised blood vessels that are weakened by uncontrolled glucose levels. - Advertisement - Kidney disease is also a common complication that can lead to a premature death. Vision loss, serious nerve damage in the eyes and extremities, and ongoing infections are other common life-threatening complications. The good news? With type 2 diabetes it can be pretty easy to avoid these serious complications. With an active lifestyle and a clean, whole foods diet, type 2 diabetes can reverse in many cases! While we can’t legally make any promises here Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drugs: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Drugs: What You Need To Know

Have you ever heard of a diabetic getting healthier once he or she started taking metformin (Glucophage) or some other diabetic drug? Of course not! Gee, I wonder why .. Unfortunately, most diabetics are prescribed a diabetic drug such as metformin (Glucophage) by their doctors once they have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. This drug (and other diabetes drugs) helps to lower your blood glucose back to the normal range. So it appears that the drug is working. Right? It depends on what you mean by "working". It addresses one of the primary symptoms of diabetes -- high blood glucose levels -- by lowering your blood glucose, hopefully back to the normal range. However, the drug doesn't do anything to actually stop the progression of the diabetes. But, because it lowers your blood glucose, it gives you the false sense of security that the drug is actually helping with your diabetes. Sure, in the short term, the drug does help a little bit, because it helps to lower your blood sugar. But, the doctor fails to tell you that the drug does absolutely nothing to stop the spread of the cell and tissue damage being caused by the diabetes! In fact, over a period of years, the drug may actually cause damage to the liver and kidneys! If you have an adverse reaction* to the drug (such as an upset stomach or diarrhea), your doctor will not tell you why this is happening -- instead, he/she will just put you on a different drug such as glimepiride (Amaryl) or glipizide (Glucotrol). *p.s. The reason why you have an adverse reaction is because your body is smart enough to know that something is wrong. Your body reacts negatively to most toxins by sending you a signal (upset stomach, diarrhea) letting you know that something is wrong. So, be careful, not to jump at taking this drug or an Continue reading >>

Do Not Take The Deadly Diabetes Drug

Do Not Take The Deadly Diabetes Drug "avandia" -- Two Reasons Why

There’s no denying that diabetes is one of the most pressing disease epidemics in the US and across other parts of the world. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. Although nearly 14 percent of men and 12 percent of women over 30 in the United States have diabetes, when you add in pre-diabetics the statistics become truly staggering, as over one in four people in the U.S. are either pre-diabetic or have full-blown diabetes! These are truly shocking statistics, as type 2 diabetes is a completely avoidable disease and in nearly all cases reversible through proper diet. Sadder still is the fact that the drug industry has been able to manipulate the medical industry and most consumers into believing their pills are the answer to the problem. Unfortunately, the conventional treatment for diabetes does far more harm than good, and the case of Avandia killing people prematurely by the thousands is a perfect example of this. Avandia – Yet Another Deadly Drug Debacle Avandia hit the market in 1999 and following a multimillion-dollar advertising campaign it quickly became a blockbuster drug. By 2006 its annual revenue was $3.2 billion. Sales plummeted to $1.2 billion in 2009, two years after a study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) that linked Avandia to a 43 percent increased risk of heart attack and a 64 percent higher risk of cardiovascular death than patients treated with other methods. Unfortunately, a committee of independent experts recommended that Avandia remain on the market, despite its risks, and an FDA oversight board voted 8 to 7 to accept the advice. I wonder just how many of them had ties to the drug industry… Dr. Graham Steps Up to Protect Your Health Once Again The last time the FDA Continue reading >>

Beware The Perils Of Severe Hypoglycemia

Beware The Perils Of Severe Hypoglycemia

Over 80 years ago, famed diabetologist Elliot Joslin said about the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes: “Ketoacidosis may kill a patient, but frequent hypoglycemic reactions will ruin him.” Unfortunately, hypoglycemia continues to be the most difficult problem facing most patients, families, and caregivers who deal with the management of type 1 diabetes on a daily basis. Frequent hypoglycemia episodes not only can “ruin,” or adversely impact the quality of life for patients, but also, when severe, can cause seizures, coma, and even death. A Tragic Case Recently, our group published a case report in the journal Endocrine Practice describing a tragic death from hypoglycemia that occurred while the patient slept in his own bed. Our patient, a 23-year-old man with type 1 diabetes who had a history of recurrent severe hypoglycemia, was using an older model insulin pump and wearing a separate, non-real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system. He was given the CGM in 2005 for the purpose of tracking his nocturnal (nighttime) blood glucose values and making further insulin pump adjustments. After he was pronounced dead in the emergency room, our diabetes nurse removed the pump and CGM to help us understand what happened. His insulin pump was found to have been working correctly. What we learned was that after supper, he had a heavy workout at a gym, followed by a late snack. Between 8 pm and midnight, he “stacked” five boluses of insulin, totaling 7.35 units (33% of his basal dose), in an attempt to keep his glucose values in “tight” control. The downloaded sensor demonstrated that his glucose values fell from about 200 mg/dL at midnight to under 50 mg/dL by 2:00 am, and to under 30 mg/dL by 5:00 am – three hours before he was found by his pare Continue reading >>

Will Pre-diabetes Kill Me?

Will Pre-diabetes Kill Me?

What exactly is pre-diabetes? It is the state where your blood sugar is higher than normal, but it is not high enough to actually be considered diabetes. Many people do not even know that they have pre-diabetes when their doctor tells them because they have no symptoms. Your doctor may do some blood tests at your yearly check-up and that be the first time you find out that you have pre-diabetes. The following image shows the ranges of blood tests for normal, pre-diabetes, and diabetes. Pre-diabetes is actually very common, but it is not a deadly disease. It is an early warning that diabetes is coming and that you need to make some changes or you could face some serious consequences. If it advances to Type 2 diabetes, the complications can have a major effect on your life If your doctor tells you that you have pre-diabetes, then the chance of you developing Type 2 diabetes is pretty high. Without changes, it is estimated that 15 to 30 percent of people that have pre-diabetes will advance to diabetes. Make sure to download our diabetes management guide for more tips. Here are some recommended articles you should read: If you do develop to Type 2 diabetes and you let your disease go uncontrolled, then the complications can kill you. If it doesn’t kill you, it can make the quality of your life go out the window. Complications include: High blood pressure: One study found that 67 percent of people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. This elevated pressure in your blood vessels can damage your heart, kidneys, and increase your risk for a stroke, which can lead to death. High cholesterol: Cholesterol sticks to the inside of your vessels and can increase your risk of heart disease, which can be deadly. Heart Disease: Heart disease is the leading killer for people wit Continue reading >>

Diabetes (type 2) Share This:

Diabetes (type 2) Share This:

Diabetes is disabling, deadly and on the rise. In fact, diabetes is at epidemic proportions in the United States. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes occurs when your body can't make insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body makes some, but not enough, insulin. It is generally accompanied by an inability to respond normally to insulin. Ninety to 95 percent of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes. A complex relationship between insulin, glucose, your liver and other hormones ensures that your blood sugar stays within set limits. Here's how it works: When you eat, your body breaks down carbohydrates from foods into various sugar molecules. One of these is glucose which is absorbed directly into your bloodstream, to be used or stored. When you don't eat, your liver (and kidney) produce sugar for fuel. Insulin causes glucose to be absorbed into your cells, where it can be used for energy. The pancreas produces insulin and regulates how much is released into your body. If you don't eat for a long period, the pancreas limits release of insulin. After a meal or a snack, the pancreas sends extra insulin into your bloodstream. If you have more glucose than your cells need, your body stores the excess in your liver as glycogen until it's needed. If all goes well, your body maintains "normal" blood sugar levels. If there isn't enough insulin or your body can't use it properly, glucose accumulates in the blood instead of going into cells. When blood glucose levels are chronically too high, you have diabetes. Over the long term, diabetes can cause serious complications, including amputations, blindness, heart disease, stroke, nerve disease, kidney disease and even premature death. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United Stat Continue reading >>

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