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How Diabetes Kills

What Does It Mean If I'm At Risk?

What Does It Mean If I'm At Risk?

Being told you are at risk of Type 2 diabetes can be confusing. The reasons people are at risk can be different and some people are more at risk than others. But, there are things everyone can do to make sure their risk of Type 2 diabetesis as low as possible. Finding out your risk is an important first step. You may have found out your risk of Type 2 diabetes from our online tool, or from a conversation with your GP. Now you know your risk, you can do something about it. If you don’t know your risk yet, find out using our free Know Your Risk online toolnow. If you found out your risk from your GP, find out more about talking to your GP about your risk. If you found out your risk using Know Your Risk, keep reading. Finding out your risk using our online tool What does your risk category mean? Your risk category explains your chances of getting Type 2 diabetes in the next 10 years, and can help you to see if there are changes you can make to reduce your risk. If you found out your risk on our Know Your Risk tool or at one of our events, here is a reminder of what your risk category means. Low or increased risk One in 20 people with low risk will get Type 2 diabetes in the next 10 years. One in 10 people with increased risk will get Type 2 diabetes in the next 10 years. It is important you're aware of your risk level, even if you are currently at low risk of Type 2 diabetes. Some of the risk factors you can do something about, and some you can’t. As you get older, or if your weight or waist size increases, your risk will increase. So even if you’re low or increased risk, make sure you’re maintaining a healthy weight, eating well and being active to keep your risk as low as possible, for as long as possible. Moderate or high risk One in seven people with moderate r Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

Most people are aware that diabetes contributes to heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, blindness and renal failure. It’s a progressive disease that can debilitate one’s body, organ by organ, when left out of control. But did you know that, long before any of these take place, diabetes can kill your sex life? Diabetes itself is not responsible for the damage done to the body. Instead, it is the rise in blood sugar that comes from either insufficient insulin release (type 1 diabetes) or a body’s resistance to the effects of insulin (type 2 diabetes). Unlike type 1 diabetes, which starts in childhood, type 2 diabetes begins in adults and is almost always related to being obese or overweight for some time. Often, it can be reversed if you return to a normal weight. Many doctors are happy if they see their diabetic patients maintain their blood sugar under 150, or even 180 if they’ve had the disease for a while. I believe, however, these levels still permit slow degeneration of the tissues and nerves of the body, which can severely affect quality of life. Ideally, a level between 80 and 125 is best. Good sexual functioning depends on good blood flow and the ability to not only perceive sensations, but to have the organs and tissues respond to these sensations. When your blood sugar is high, cells cannot function properly and nerve endings become damaged. This can cause numbness—or worse, uncomfortable tingling. Uncontrolled levels of blood sugar also damage the blood vessels by decreasing their ability to relax and contract when needed, as well as by raising the risk of atherosclerosis, which in turn impairs blood flow. These changes can affect your sex life, too. Nerve damage can result in decreased sensation in the genitals, which makes it more di Continue reading >>

Why Do Cancer & Aids Get More Support Than Diabetes?

Why Do Cancer & Aids Get More Support Than Diabetes?

On Diabetes Alert Day, as we promote uncovering your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, we are confronted by the failure of our movement. The diabetes problem is so big, the costs so high, and our failure so substantial, that our successes seem trivial. Even as someone who covers diabetes every day, it is hard to comprehend the scale of diabetes. To put it in perspective, here’s a table comparing diabetes, AIDS and breast cancer in the USA: Total (inc. Survivors) Diagnosed / Year Deaths / Year Diabetes 104,800,000 1,900,000 231,404 Breast Cancer 2,900,000 200,000 40,000 AIDS 1,148,200 32,000 15,000 How We Have Failed One out of three Americans have some type of diabetes. Seventy-nine million have pre-diabetes. Most of them don’t even know they have it, walking around with elevated blood sugars silently devouring their health. The sum of personal pain caused by diabetes is as wide and deep as this country. The picture isn’t any prettier abroad. Then we get to the financial cost. The American Cancer Society estimated the annual impact of all cancers at $201 billion in the USA. Diabetes costs an even more startling $245 billion. Diabetes is likely the largest single driver in the increase in domestic and global health care costs. These big numbers aren’t driven so much by daily treatments, although they can be expensive, but by the people falling through the cracks. Our biggest expense is not diabetes, but untreated diabetes! Yet when it comes to diabetes in our culture, we are surrounded by deafening silence. We know that diabetes is hitting one out of every three Americans. We know the cost is bankrupting our health care system. Yet when you look at the media, the fundraising, and the research, so much of the awareness and visibility is going elsewhere, towards Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education website. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes. It means that your body can't make insulin. Insulin helps your body use the sugar it makes from the food you eat. Your body uses this sugar for energy. We need insulin to live. Without insulin, your blood sugar level goes up, you get thirsty and you urinate a lot. What problems can type 1 diabetes cause? People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to get heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, high blood pressure, blindness, nerve damage and gum disease. These things happen two to four times more often in people with diabetes than in people without diabetes. When you have type 1 diabetes, blood may not move as well through your legs and feet. If left untreated, this might lead to amputation of your feet. Untreated type 1 diabetes can cause coma. It can even kill you. The good news is that treatment can help you prevent these problems. How can these problems be prevented? To help prevent these problems, keep your blood sugar under tight control, eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, don't smoke and keep your blood pressure and cholesterol levels low. If you do all of these things, your risk of complications can be cut by more than 75 percent. How do I keep my blood sugar under tight control? Insulin helps people with type 1 diabetes keep the level of sugar in their blood at a normal level. Many people with type 1 diabetes take short-acting insulin before each meal. You Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

Diabetes Kills 2.1 Million Women Every Year

Diabetes Kills 2.1 Million Women Every Year

Islamabad: Worldwide, diabetes is the 9th leading cause of death in women, causing 2.1 million deaths each year. As a result of socioeconomic conditions, girls and women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective diabetes prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and care, particularly in developing countries. Socioeconomic inequalities expose women to the main risk factors of diabetes, including poor diet and nutrition, physical inactivity, tobacco consumption and harmful use of alcohol. Consultant gynaecologist at Shifa International Hospital (SIH) Dr. Shahnaz Nawaz shared this piece of information while speaking at a seminar organized to mark World Diabetes Day here at SIH on Tuesday. Doctors, SIH officials, students, patients and people from all walks of life attended the seminar. Free consultancy, blood sugar screening, informative booklets and prizes were given to the Dr. Shahnaz said, there are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes and this total is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040. Gender roles and power dynamics influence vulnerability to diabetes, affect access to health services and health-seeking behaviour for women, and amplify the impact of diabetes on women. Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for over 60 million women worldwide. Women with diabetes have more difficulty conceiving and may have poor pregnancy outcomes. Without pre-conception planning, type 1 and type 2 diabetes can result in a significantly higher risk of maternal and child mortality and morbidity. Dr. Shahnaz apprised the audience that 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes (GDM), a severe and neglected threat to maternal and child health. Many women with GDM experience pregnancy re Continue reading >>

Diabetes Kills 1 Person Every 6 Seconds

Diabetes Kills 1 Person Every 6 Seconds

The IDF released some startling and worrying facts about diabetes across the world… One in ten of the world’s population will have diabetes by 2035 according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The latest edition IDF Diabetes Atlas, published on World Diabetes Day, estimates that people living with diabetes will surge from 382 million to 592 million people by 2035, many in low and middle income countries and the majority under 60. This surge will form the backdrop of the World Diabetes Congress (#WDC2013) in Melbourne, Australia this December. In some Pacific Island nations there has been an alarming surge in diabetes prevalence. One adult in three has the disease on the Pacific Island of Tokelau, providing a microcosm of how diabetes could play out in more populous nations within the coming decades. Sub-Saharan Africa will see a doubling in the number of people with diabetes by 2035, the largest surge of any region in the world. Previous estimates from the IDF Diabetes Atlas in 2012 put the number of people with diabetes at 371 million and number of deaths for 2012 at 4.8 million. The new figures show that the upward trend will continue. By the end of 2013, 5.1 million people will have died from diabetes related complications. With 175 million undiagnosed cases many people are progressing towards complications unaware. SEE ALSO Continue reading >>

What Are Some Myths About Type 2 Diabetes?

What Are Some Myths About Type 2 Diabetes?

There are a number of myths about type 2 diabetes. The most dangerous myth is the belief that diabetes isn’t that serious. In fact, type 2 diabetes kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Another popular misconception is that type 2 diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar. This myth probably stems from the fact that if you eat a lot of sugar, you may be overweight, and that can increase your risk for type 2 diabetes. But just because you consume a lot of sugar doesn’t mean you’ll end up with diabetes, which is caused by heredity and lifestyle factors, such as being overweight and not exercising. Another myth: Some people believe that if you have type 2 diabetes, you must eat only special foods. Not true. Your diet should be one that would be healthy for anyone -- low in fat, with vegetables, fruits, whole grains, lean meat and nonfat dairy products. The top 4 myths about type 2 diabetes are: Myth 1: "Diabetes is nothing to worry about -- it's just a 'touch of sugar.' I'm just borderline." Fact: Diabetes is a serious condition, but there's a lot you can do to take care of yourself. Myth 2: "If I take my diabetes pills, I don't have to worry about what I eat or whether I exercise." Fact: All three ways -- medication, meal planning, and physical activity -- work together to treat diabetes. Myth 3: "Once you have diabetes, there's nothing you can do to prevent health problems." Fact: Research has proven that keeping blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels on target can help prevent diabetes complications such as heart attack, stroke, and eye problems. Myth 4: "Now that I have diabetes, I shouldn't eat sugar or carbohydrates." Fact: These days, people with diabetes can eat sweets, carbohydrates, or any other food and still ke Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Here’s what you need to know about the life-threatening diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Symptoms can take you by surprise, coming on in just 24 hours or less. Without diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, you will fall into a coma and die. “Every minute that the person is not treated is [another] minute closer to death,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin. (Diabetic ketoacidosis most often affects people with type 1 diabetes, but there is also type 2 diabetes ketoacidosis.) Without insulin, sugar can’t be stored in your cells to be used as energy and builds up in your blood instead. Your body has to go to a back-up energy system: fat. In the process of breaking down fat for energy, your body releases fatty acids and acids called ketones. Ketones are an alternative form of energy for the body, and just having them in your blood isn’t necessarily harmful. That’s called ketosis, and it can happen when you go on a low-carb diet or even after fasting overnight. “When I put people on a restricted diet, I can get an estimate of how vigorously they’re pursuing it by the presence of ketones in the urine,” says Gerald Bernstein, MD, an endocrinologist and coordinator of the Friedman Diabetes Program at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. RELATED: The Ketogenic Diet Might Be the Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It? But too many ketones are a problem. “In individuals with diabetes who have no or low insulin production, there is an overproduction of ketones, and the kidneys can’t get rid of them fast enough,” sa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Kills More Americans Than Thought

Diabetes Kills More Americans Than Thought

HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans who die from diabetes is much higher than previously believed, according to a new study. The research, based on federal government data, found that diabetes causes 12 percent of deaths in the United States. That makes it the third-leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer, researchers said. "Another way of saying that is, if diabetes were eliminated as a disease process, the number of deaths would decline by 12 percent," said study author Samuel Preston, a sociology professor at the University of Pennsylvania. "There has been only one similar, earlier research effort, and it was based on data from the 1980s and early '90s. It showed deaths attributable to diabetes amounted to roughly 4 percent of total deaths," he said in a university news release. Data for the new study came from the U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Both are conducted annually, which gives researchers more current figures. From this, the researchers found that Americans with diabetes have about a 90 percent higher death rate than those without diabetes. They noted that diabetes as the "underlying cause of death" had been significantly underreported in the United States. "There is only one underlying cause of death on a death certificate," Preston said. But, "diabetes is not listed as frequently as it is involved in the death of individuals." *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. Study co-author Andrew Stokes is a Continue reading >>

‘diabetes Kills 82,000 Women Annually In Pakistan’

‘diabetes Kills 82,000 Women Annually In Pakistan’

KARACHI: Eminent diabetologist Prof Dr Zaman Shaikh has said that an estimated 82,000 women die of diabetes and its related complications in Pakistan every year and the death ratio in females is higher than males in the country. In a statement issued on Saturday, Prof Zaman Shaikh, while quoting the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), said the number of patients with diabetes in Pakistan was seven million, which would rise to 14.4 million by 2040 if not controlled. “Poor socio-economic conditions in developing countries like Pakistan, women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective treatment and care,” he said. “Although prevalence ratio of diabetes is almost equal in women and men but around 82,000 women die of diabetic-related complications in Pakistan each year, while 36,000 men die of diabetes in the country,” he added. Diabetes potentially affects almost every organ in your body and disease silently damages major organs like eye, kidney, foot and others if not controlled properly, he added. “At present, there are 199 million women with diabetes in worldwide and this number will rise to staggering figure of 313 million by the year 2040.” “Approximately 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes (GDM), a serious threat to maternal and child health. Approximately half of women with a history of GDM go on to develop type-2 diabetes within 5 to 6 years after giving birth,” he explained. Prof Zaman Shaikh said diabetes was the 9th leading cause of death in women worldwide, causing 2.1 million deaths every year. He said at present, 415 million adults were suffering from diabetes and this number would rise to 642 million by the year 2040. He urged the people to modify their lifestyle, change their unhealthy dietary habits, in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Causes And Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy: Causes And Symptoms

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy—DPN for short—is diabetes-related damage to nerves that sit near the surface of your skin. DPN usually affects the feet and the hands, but can also harm nerves in arms and legs. Approximately 50 percent of people with type 2 diabetes and 20% of those with type 1 diabetes develop this kind of nerve damage.1 DPN can be extremely painful—or cause numbness so that you have little feeling, especially in your feet. DPN damages two different types of nerves close to the surface of your skin. DPN can affect small nerves that protect your body by sending signals about pain and temperature changes to your brain. This condition can also attack large nerves that detect touch, pressure and help you keep your balance. 2 Symptoms are different for each type. Most people with DPN have damage to both types of nerves. DPN usually affects extremities—feet, hands, legs and arms—where nerve fibers are the longest and most numerous. 3 Causes Experts are still investigating exactly how diabetes harms and kills these nerve cells. “The causes remain unknown,” the American Diabetes Association noted in a definitive 2017 review. One thing is certain: The conventional wisdom—that high blood sugar is the cause—is just part of the story. New research is revealing a bigger cast of culprits. These include high cholesterol, high triglycerides (another blood fat), high blood pressure, obesity and smoking, according to a British research report in a widely-cited 2005 study that tracked 1,172 people with diabetes for seven years. 4 The threats are major: Obesity and high triglycerides each doubled risk in people with diabetes in a 2013 University of Utah study of 218 people with type 2 diabetes. 5 Smoking increased risk by as much as 42% in a 2015 Harvard M Continue reading >>

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Diabetes affects almost 26 million Americans, which is more than 8 percent of the U.S. population. The condition often requires them to make lifestyle changes, including what they eat, how they exercise and the medications they take. It also requires them to change the way they take care of their teeth and gums. About one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal disease which is causing the gum tissue and bone around the teeth to break down, according to the National Institutes of Health. People with poorly-controlled diabetes had a 2.9 times increased risk of developing periodontitis than non-diabetics, according to a large study published in 2002. The same study found people with well-controlled diabetes had no significant increase in the risk of periodontitis. There are several reasons why poorly-controlled diabetes can increase your chance of getting periodontal disease, said Dr. Dale Nash, a dentist at Coast Dental Wesley Chapel. In the past decade, Dr. Nash has seen an increase in the number of patients with diabetes. "People with diabetes are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection," Dr. Nash said. "Diabetics have high blood sugar, which basically coats the immune-fighting cells and affects the blood supply to many areas of the body including the patient’s mouth." Here’s how it works: The poor circulation affects the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the gums, called the gingiva, and the cells in your mouth that help fight off infection. If the gums can’t get the nutrients they need, then it’s harder to fight infection. Also, poor circulation means the blood can’t carry away bad bacteria effectively. Research shows the functions of immune cells in poorly-controlled diabetics are altered in other ways.(1) One kind o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Kills Only Careless People, Says Obasanjo

Diabetes Kills Only Careless People, Says Obasanjo

Former President Chief Olusegun Obasanjo says that diabetes only kills those who are careless about its treatment. Obasanjo made the statement on Friday in Abeokuta when he led hundreds of people on a road walk to sensitise the populace on the disease and how to manage it. The road walk was organised by the South West Zone of the Diabetes Association of Nigeria (DAN) in collaboration with the Olusegun Obasanjo Presidential Library (OOPL), to mark the 2017 World Diabetes Day. The two kilometre walk which began at the OOPL, passed through MKO Abiola Way with 15 minutes stop-over at the premises of Sunny Yinka Oil before terminating at the take-off point. The former president was joined on the walk by the Oluwo of Iwoland, Oba Abdulrasheed Akanbi, Commissioner for Health in Ogun, Dr Babatunde Ipaye and Chief Executive Officer of the Olusegun Obasanjo Foundation, Dr Olalekan Makinde According to Obasanjo, if a person with diabetes takes care of himself, he will discover that “diabetes is not a killer disease.” Obasanjo lamented the fact that many youths in the country rarely exercised, saying that because of his lifestyle, in spite of his age, he was still agile and fit. “Diabetes is not a disease that should kill. I was diagnosed to be diabetic more than 30 years ago but rather I am growing stronger. “If you don’t believe I am growing strong and you didn’t witness this walk, come and see me at night, you will know I am growing strong. “Come and see me in the morning, you will know I am growing strong, even in the afternoon; you will know I am growing strong. “What is necessary is management of diabetes. Some people said some diseases are incurable but diabetes is manageable and compliant. “My headmaster in primary school was diagnosed at the age of 50 and Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet In Hf; Weight Loss Kills Diabetes; Personalized Pacing

Mediterranean Diet In Hf; Weight Loss Kills Diabetes; Personalized Pacing

Following the Mediterranean diet wasn't associated with a longer life in acute heart failure (AHF), but it was associated with fewer readmissions, the observational MEDIT-AHF study from Spain reported in JACC: Heart Failure. The half of patients whose relatives completed a 14-question form on the patient's diet indicating adherence to the traditional diet had a 26% relatively lower rehospitalization rate during 2.1 years of follow-up than did nonadherent patients (P=0.003), "suggesting a lower severity of AHF," according to the researchers. According to an accompanying editorial, "The results offer space for further investigation into simple dietary modifications to improve heart failure morbidity and mortality. It also pushes the medical community to consider heart failure outcomes that should not be discounted in any way, such as quality of life and healthcare costs. Although seemingly small morsels of success, these outcomes could have potentially large benefits." See full coverage on MedPage Today. Diabetes Remission Substantial weight loss puts most newer-onset type 2 diabetes into remission, an open-label randomized trial of meal replacement reported in The Lancet. After 12 months on a total diet replacement, remission was achieved by 46% on the intervention versus 4% of controls. Remission was more common the more weight participants lost: 86% of the 24% of participants who lost at least 15 kg (33.1 lbs) and 57% of those who lost 10 to 15 kg (22-33.1 lbs) reached that endpoint in the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT). An accompanying commentary said the "impressive" findings "strongly support the view that type 2 diabetes is tightly associated with excessive fat mass in the body" and suggest that weight loss should be the top priority in type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

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