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How Diabetes Affects Feet

How Does Eating Sugar As A Diabetic Affect Your Appearance?

How Does Eating Sugar As A Diabetic Affect Your Appearance?

I started losing a little weight, and face became more skinny. I am type 2 diabetic and Hypothyroid. Black stripes appear on the rear of neck for some. Pigmentation around temples. High blood sugar leaves one very tired and unenthusiastic. It will be very evident. It may be different for different people. I speak about my experience. I started getting better when I made improvements to my lifestyle and ate healthy. Wish you good health ! Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

How To Look After Your Feet If You Have Diabetes

How To Look After Your Feet If You Have Diabetes

It's especially important to look after your feet if you have diabetes. Here's how to take care of your feet and advice on when to get professional help. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to your feet and cause a loss of feeling known as peripheral neuropathy. This can mean foot injuries do not heal well, and you may not notice if your foot is sore or injured. "The risk of complications can be greatly reduced if you're able to bring your blood sugar levels under control," says foot specialist Mike O'Neill. "Ensure that your blood pressure and cholesterol levels are also monitored and controlled with medication if needed." Foot care tips if you have diabetes See a private or NHS podiatrist at least once a year. You should be eligible for an NHS podiatrist if you have a long term condition such as diabetes. Ask your GP for a referral or find a local podiatrist. Keep your feet clean and free from infection. Wear shoes that fit well and don't squeeze or rub. Ill-fitting shoes can cause corns and calluses, ulcers and nail problems. Never walk barefoot, especially in the garden or on the beach on holidays to avoid cuts and try to avoid sitting with your legs crossed so you don't constrict your blood circulation. Cut or file your toenails regularly. Get corns or hard skin treated by a podiatrist. Stop smoking to protect your feet If you have diabetes, it's important to try to stop smoking. Smoking impairs the blood circulation, particularly in people with diabetes. It can seriously worsen foot and leg problems. Read more about how the NHS can help you to stop smoking. When to see a doctor Seek treatment from your GP or podiatrist if blisters or injuries do not heal quickly. You should see your doctor urgently if: you notice breaks in the skin of your foot, or discharge seep Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Your Feet

How Diabetes Affects Your Feet

Diabetes has wide-ranging effects on the body, which comes as no surprise to the individuals who live with the disease. This metabolic condition affects the body’s ability to produce insulin and causes elevated blood sugar levels. Given that blood is responsible for providing nourishment throughout the entire body, it is easy to understand how the effects can be so far-reaching. Blood already has the furthest path to travel down to the feet. When your circulation is compromised because of this disease, the importance of diabetic foot care becomes quite clear. Two issues that often accompany diabetes can have a particularly concerning effect on the feet—neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). With the first, nerve damage prevents the peripheral nerves (the ones responsible for reporting stimuli to the spinal column and brain) from performing their job. With the second, your feet don’t receive the nutrients they need for healthy cell function. Diabetic neuropathy creates a dangerous situation where damage can be sustained but go unnoticed—and untreated—leading to the potential for infections, Charcot foot, and gangrene. Charcot foot is even more likely when diabetes also results in PAD. Peripheral arterial disease is a condition that has a negative effect on blood circulation. Hardened, narrowed blood vessels lead to reduced blood flow, which deprives tissues of essential nutrients. When bones do not receive the nourishment they need, they become brittle and can break easily. If damaged nerves are unable to report the injury, an individual can keep walking as normal and continue to break and re-break bones until the foot is misshapen and deformed. Beyond nerve and circulatory problems, diabetes also negatively affects the immune system, so the body is Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Feet

How Diabetes Affects Feet

If you have diabetes, there are many different implications for your physical health and wellbeing, including heart disease, kidney disease, pancreas malfunction, and vision problems (even blindness!). This is clearly a serious medical issue, but it is important not to overlook the way the disease affects the health of your feet. Charcot foot and diabetic foot ulcers are two examples of very serious medical problems that can develop on account of diabetes. The best way to reduce the risk of such issues is to have a diabetic foot care plan in place. This is comprised of various pillars, but one of the most valuable is performing a diabetic foot self-exam every day. Little problems can escalate into severe issues—the aforementioned Charcot foot and ulcers—but if you are able to catch them early, you can derail their progress. When neuropathy (nerve damage) is present and you are unable to feel things like a tiny cut or scrape, it will go untreated and infection can set, which could ultimately lead to an emergency room visit. So, if you are unable to feel issues when they develop, how can you take care of them at early, less-dangerous stages? Well, this is where your daily foot check comes into play. Physically inspecting all surfaces of both feet on a daily basis is necessary to discover any problems at their earliest, most treatable stages. This is especially important for those who have neuropathy. Perform your inspection before going to bed, and use a mirror or the assistance from a loved one if you are unable to see the bottoms of your feet. If you find anything out of the ordinary during your daily foot inspection, call us and schedule the earliest possible appointment! If you observe any signs of infection—warmth, swelling, redness—seek immediate medical car Continue reading >>

Foot Care

Foot Care

When you have diabetes you need to take care of your feet every day Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations Daily care can prevent serious complications Check your feet daily for changes or problems Visit a podiatrist annually for a check up or more frequently if your feet are at high risk Your feet are at risk because diabetes can cause damage to the nerves in your feet, blood circulation and infection. Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and amputations. This damage is more likely if: You have had diabetes for a long time Your blood glucose levels have been too high for an extended period You smoke – smoking causes a reduced blood flow to your feet, wounds heal slowly You are inactive. It's important to check your feet every day. If you see any of the following- get medical treatment that *day * Ulcer Unusual swelling Redness Blisters Ingrown nail Bruising or cuts If you see any of the following- get medical treatment within 7 days Broken skin between toes Callus Corn Foot shape changes Cracked skin Nail colour changes Poor blood glucose control can cause nerve damage to feet. Symptoms include: Numbness Coldness of the legs A tingling, pins and needles sensation in the feet Burning pains in the legs and feet, usually more noticeable in bed at night. These symptoms can result in a loss of sensation in the feet which increases the risk of accidental damage because you can’t feel any pain. An injury to the feet can develop into an ulcer on the bottom of a foot which can penetrate to the bone. This could lead to infection of the bone (osteomyelitis) and a chronic infection in the bones and joints. If an infection isn’t treated at the earliest signs, this could result in ulceration (an infected open sore) and eventually Continue reading >>

Diabetes Questions: How Do Blood Sugar Levels Affect Your Feet?

Diabetes Questions: How Do Blood Sugar Levels Affect Your Feet?

When it comes to managing your blood glucose, keep in mind the whole-body effects of high blood glucose levels. For individuals with diabetes, continued exposure to high blood glucose can result in serious complications, including foot problems. When the body is exposed to these high levels, over time the nerves in the body can become damaged. When the nerves in the body become damaged, this can result in neuropathy or specifically diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In fact, about 60% to 70% of all people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, but today we’re going to focus on diabetic neuropathy because it is the most common type and it impacts your feet. What is diabetic peripheral neuropathy? Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a type of nerve disorder that impacts a person’s legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms. Over time, a variety of factors can cause nerve damage in the body, resulting in sensations of numbness and pain in parts of the body. You may experience pain, tingling, or total loss of feeling in your extremities. What parts of the body does peripheral neuropathy affect? Peripheral neuropathy impacts a person’s toes, feet, legs, hands, and arms. Diabetic neuropathy affects the longest nerves first, that’s why the extremities of the body are affected, usually starting with the toes and feet. Keep in mind, this is a person-specific condition, and everyone will experience symptoms differently. What are the long term complications of diabetic peripheral neuropathy? Like all things pertaining to health, nerve damage has different symptoms and complications for different people. However, when you have diabetic peripheral neuropathy, you have an increased risk of foot ulcers and amputation. This typically happens, because when you lose sensation in your feet Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Foot Care And Foot Ulcers

Diabetes, Foot Care And Foot Ulcers

Some people with diabetes develop foot ulcers. A foot ulcer is prone to infection, which may become severe. This leaflet aims to explain why foot ulcers sometimes develop, what you can do to help prevent them, and typical treatments if one does occur. Why are people with diabetes prone to foot ulcers? Foot ulcers are more common if you have diabetes because one or both of the following complications develop in some people with diabetes: Reduced sensation of the skin on your feet. Narrowing of blood vessels going to the feet. Your nerves may not work as well as normal because even a slightly high blood sugar (glucose) level can, over time, damage some of your nerves (neuropathy). Read more about diabetic neuropathy. If you have diabetes you have an increased risk of developing narrowing of the blood vessels (arteries), known as peripheral arterial disease. The arteries in the legs are quite commonly affected. This can cause a reduced blood supply (poor circulation) to the feet. Skin with a poor blood supply does not heal as well as normal and is more likely to be damaged. What increases the risk of developing foot ulcers? If you have reduced sensation to your feet (see above). The risk of this occurring increases the longer you have diabetes and the older you are. If your diabetes is poorly controlled. This is one of the reasons why it is very important to keep your blood sugar (glucose) level as near normal as possible. If you have narrowed blood vessels (arteries) - see above. The risk of this occurring increases the longer you have diabetes, the older you become and also if you are male. The risk also increases if you have any other risk factors for developing furring of the arteries. For example, if you smoke, do little physical activity, have a high cholesterol leve Continue reading >>

Leg, Foot, And Organ Damage With Diabetes

Leg, Foot, And Organ Damage With Diabetes

Healthy nerves carry messages to our muscles and organs. Having high blood sugar levels for a long time can damage nerves throughout the body. Also, the older people get and the longer they have diabetes, the more likely they are to have some nerve damage. When nerves become damaged, they can't send messages, the messages they send get interrupted, or the messages get mixed up. This is a condition called diabetic neuropathy. High blood sugar affects: Long nerves from the spinal cord that allow us to move and feel. Smaller nerves that support our body organs including the heart, stomach, and bladder. Leg and Foot Damage Long nerves from the spinal cord send messages to the lower legs and feet. When blood sugar levels stay high, the nerve cells swell and scar. After a while, the nerves can't send messages to the legs and feet the way they should. When this happens, it can cause people to lose feeling in their legs and feet, making it hard to sense pressure or pain. It can also cause uncomfortable feelings in the arms and legs, like tingling, shooting pains, or aching. This condition is known as peripheral neuropathy. Damaged nerves can also affect the muscles in the legs and feet, causing them to lose shape. When muscles in the foot lose their shape, they aren't able to hold the bones and joints of the feet together, or they can pull up on the bones, causing the foot to become deformed. These kinds of changes can put pressure on parts of the foot that aren't meant for walking, making it harder and more painful to walk. Sometimes people lose feeling in their feet without realizing it. When people don't know they've lost feeling, it can lead to very serious foot problems, including wounds that won't heal. Treatment Ask your doctor or other member of your health care team to Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Chronically high blood sugar (glucose) levels can be associated with serious complications in people who have diabetes. The feet are especially at risk. Two conditions called diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can damage the feet (and other areas of the body) in people who have diabetes. What is diabetic neuropathy? Chronically high sugar levels associated with uncontrolled diabetes can cause nerve damage that interferes with the ability to sense pain and temperature. This so-called "sensory diabetic neuropathy" increases the risk a person with diabetes will not notice problems with his or her feet. Nearly 10% of people with diabetes develop foot ulcers due to peripheral vascular disease and nerve damage. People with diabetes may not notice sores or cuts on the feet, which in turn can lead to an infection. Nerve damage can also affect the function of foot muscles, leading to improper alignment and injury. What is peripheral vascular disease? Diabetes is associated with poor circulation (blood flow). Inadequate blood flow increases the healing time for cuts and sores. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs. Poor blood flow increases the risk that infections will not heal. This, in turn, increases the risk of ulcers and gangrene, which is tissue death that occurs in a localized area when there is an inadequate blood supply. What are common foot problems of people with diabetes? The following images show common foot problems that anyone can get; however, those with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications associated with these conditions, including infection and even amputation. Athlete's foot Fungal infection of the feet is called athlete's foot. Cracked skin, itching, and redness are associated w Continue reading >>

Foot Problems

Foot Problems

Tweet Diabetes often means that there is a greater risk of a foot condition becoming serious so it’s important to let your doctor know if you have symptoms of any of the foot conditions in this guide. It’s important not to dismiss a foot problem as mild as each of the problems listed has the potential to be serious when diabetes is present. When contacting your doctor about any of these conditions, ensure the health team, including receptionist know that you have diabetes. Causes of diabetic foot problems There are a range of different foot complications which may each have different causes but there are some causes that are common to a number of foot problems. Poorly fitting shoes can lead to rubbing of skin causing blisters and corns and shoes that don’t leave enough room for all the toes may increase the chance of bunions or hammer toes occurring. Walking barefoot raises the risk of suffering a foot wound or, particularly in hot weather, burns. Having neuropathy can significantly increase the risk of a foot condition occurring as you may not sense when your feet are becoming aggravated or damaged. Having poor blood circulation can also lead to a number of foot problems. Preventing foot problems There are a number of ways you can reduce the chances of developing a foot problem, which include: Wearing shoes that fit well Avoiding walking bare foot Keeping feet clean Keeping feet moisturised Importantly – checking your feet for signs of damage on a daily basis Athlete's foot (tinea pedis) A fungal infection of the foot characterised by a rash between the toes which may be itchy and cause dry, flaky skin. Athlete’s foot can lead to fungal infection of the toenails and may cause skin on your feet to crack which can lead to infection and therefore can be a seriou Continue reading >>

Signs Of Foot Problems

Signs Of Foot Problems

Prevention is the best medicine. Being able to identify signs of foot problems can go a long way in preventing complications. Have your health care professional check your feet AT LEAST one to two times per year or more if required. When to see your doctor If you have any corns (thick or hard skin on toes), calluses (thick skin on bottom of feet), in-grown toenails, warts or slivers, have them treated by your doctor or a foot care specialist (such as a podiatrist, chiropodist or experienced foot care nurse). Do not try to treat them yourself. If you have any swelling, warmth, redness or pain in your legs or feet, see your doctor or foot specialist right away. Have your bare feet checked by your doctor at least once a year. In addition, ask your doctor to screen you for neuropathy and loss of circulation at least once a year. Take your socks off at every diabetes-related visit to your doctor and ask him or her to inspect your feet. Know the signs Numb, painful or tingling? Control your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Have a health-care professional trim your toenails and care for the skin on your feet. Have your shoes professionally fitted. Changing shape? Avoid too much walking. Visit your health-care professional as soon as possible. Dry, callused or cracked? Do they have sores or blisters? Changes to your skin should be seen by a health-care professional. Wash a sore or blister with warm water; dry well, and cover with a bandage. See a health-care professional today. Please continue to check your feet every day for any changes or signs of injury. If you have answered YES to any of these questions, please see a health-care professional as soon as possible. Be sure to tell him/her that you have diabetes. Avoid using over-the-counter treatments unless directed to by a heal Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Feet

How Diabetes Affects Feet

Diabetes can reduce the circulation and sensation in your feet, diminishing awareness of changes in temperature, and of pain and touch. A complication of diabetes is abnormal circulation, Ischaemia, which reduces the blood flow to the peripheral tissues. When combined with poor glucose control, smoking, poor footwear and the feet not being examined, ischaemia can lead to an increased risk of foot lesions and infections, which may result in foot ulceration. In extreme cases foot ulceration may lead to amputation. Of course this is not always the case, if noticed in time the ulcer can be treated. The loss of sensation, which often starts at the toes, is known as Peripheral Neuropathy. As a result, foot problems may occur without you being aware of them. Diabetes is likely to affect the body’s ability to heal, so any minor cuts or blisters may turn into a more serious problem if left untreated. Neuropathy Diabetes can cause nerve damage; this is called Neuropathy. Sensory Neuropathy mainly affects the nerves in the feet and legs. The main danger of sensory neuropathy is loss of feeling in the feet. This means you may be unaware of any injuries or changes to your feet, which, if left untreated, may lead to more serious problems. Symptoms of Neuropathy A tingling sensation, similar to pins and needles, in the toes, feet or lower leg. Numbness in the feet. Pain – a burning sensation, pins and needles or shooting pains in the feet, which can extend into the legs. What can your Podiatrist do for you? A diabetic assessment will be carried out. This will involve noting your HbA1c (Glucose control), checking your blood supply, testing the feeling in your feet, checking for any other symptoms, and giving advice on any changes in your lifestyle that are required. Both feet will Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Feet

How Diabetes Affects Feet

How diabetes affects feet is a focus of Elio’s team of experts. Elio’s staff advises our patients living with diabetes to focus on footcare as a daily activity. Statistics show approximately 2.3 million Canadians currently live with diabetes. The data also shows 14 to 24 per cent of diabetics are at risk of suffering a foot ulcer that could result in the amputation of a foot or leg. Diabetes Affects Feet Nerve damage is also known as neuropathy. When neuropathy effects your feet, it can cause damage in your sensory, motor or autonomic nerves. Over a long period of time high blood glucose levels can cause damage to many areas of your body, including your feet and legs. High blood glucose levels can cause damage to nerve systems in your body, which stops important messages getting to and from your brain. The nerves in your body that are most likely to be affected are the longest; those that have to reach all the way to your feet and legs. Elio’s team of experts can show you how damage to these nerves due to diabetes may affect your feet. Diabetes Affects Feet Damage to sensory nerves can cause loss of sensation in your feet. People affected by this damage are less able to feel pain, temperatures and vibrations.. Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Human Body?

How Does Diabetes Affect The Human Body?

I am not an expert, Just a Learner. Knowing how diabetes affects your body can help you look after your body and prevent diabetic complications from developing. Many of the effects of diabetes stem from the same guilty parties; namely high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a lack of blood glucose control. Signs of diabetes When undiagnosed or uncontrolled, the effects of diabetes on the body can be noticed by the classic symptoms of diabetes, namely: Long term effects of diabetes on the body In addition to the symptoms, diabetes can cause long term damage to our body. The long term damage is commonly referred to as diabetic complications. Diabetes affects our blood vessels and nerves and therefore can affect any part of the body. However, certain parts of our body are affected more than other parts. Diabetic complications will usually take a number of years of poorly controlled diabetes to develop. Complications are not a certainty and can be kept at bay and prevented by maintaining a strong level of control on your diabetes, your blood pressure and cholesterol. These can all be helped by keeping to a healthy diet, avoiding cigarettes and alcohol, and incorporating regular activity into your daily regime in order to keep blood sugar levels within recommendedblood glucose level guidelines. The effect of diabetes on the heart Diabetes contributes to high blood pressure and is linked with high cholesterol which significantly increases the risk of heart attacks and cardiovascular disease. Diabetes and strokes Similar to how diabetes affects the heart, high blood pressure and cholesterol raises the risk of strokes. How diabetes affects the eyes As with all complications, this condition is brought on by a number of years of poorly controlled or uncontrolled diabetes Continue reading >>

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