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How Close Is A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Scientists Believe They Are Close To Finding A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Scientists Believe They Are Close To Finding A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

According to statistics, around 23 million adults have diabetes only in the U.S. Five percent of them have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition where the body’s not able to produce any insulin to manage your blood sugar levels properly. People with this type of diabetes must take several insulin shots a day to control their blood glucose. Along with the need for insulin, they also have to pay attention to their diet and physical activity. However, scientists from MIT, Boston Children’s Hospital Harvard might discover something that can make insulin shots a thing of the past for people with type 1 diabetes. Possible Discovery As scientists explain, they are on the verge of creating replacements for the beta cells located in the pancreas, responsible for producing insulin. The human’s body with type 1 diabetes mysteriously destroys these pancreatic cells. As a result, it makes it impossible to produce the much-needed insulin. The journals Nature Biotechnology and Nature Medicine shared the researchers’ claims that they have developed material from brown algae which might work for up to 6 months at a time. So, this would mean a significant relief from the daily insulin shots. The MIT chemical engineering professor Daniel Anderson shares the excitement about the results of the study. Together with his team, they work hard to take the technology to the clinic. Just a reminder, this type of diabetes is not connected to lifestyle or weight, unlike type 2 diabetes. The Goal of The New Treatment The vice president of discovery research of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, JDRF, Julia Greenstein, believes the encapsulation therapies could be revolutionary for type 1 diabetes patients. The goal of the treatments is creating a lon Continue reading >>

Scientists Say They Are Close To Finding A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Scientists Say They Are Close To Finding A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Unable to play video. Neither flash nor html5 is supported! Researchers at MIT and Harvard University believe they've almost perfected a Type 1 diabetes treatment that would eliminate the need for insulin shots. The body relies on insulin to push blood sugar (or energy) into cells. People with Type 1 diabetes don't produce enough insulin to prevent the sugar from backing up in the bloodstream. SEE ALSO: Warning, this website will crash your iPhone One treatment that's been in the works for decades involves transplanting insulin-producing cells into the patient's body. The cells appear to control the patient's blood sugar better than drugs or injections. The downside is these cells can be destroyed by the immune system, but the new study tested a so-called "invisibility cloak" that was able to keep the immune systems in mice from attacking the transplanted cells for nearly six months. In 2014, researchers also found a way to mass produce these cells in the lab. Together, the two techniques could effectively cure Type 1 diabetes. One of the researchers said their approach "has the potential to provide diabetics with a new pancreas, ... which would allow them to control their blood sugar without taking drugs." The researchers now plan to test the techniques in monkeys. The study was published Tuesday in the journal Nature. More on AOL.com: There's a disturbing theory about why America's overdose epidemic is primarily affecting white people Parents capture heartwarming moment on baby monitor Shoppers shocked by racist display at craft store Continue reading >>

Immunotherapy Succeeds In Thwarting Type-1 Diabetes In Study

Immunotherapy Succeeds In Thwarting Type-1 Diabetes In Study

In a small but rigorous clinical trial, British investigators gave patients recently diagnosed with the metabolic disorder a truncated version of the chemical that gives rise to insulin. After a quarter-century of failed efforts to treat diabetes with an immune therapy, the experimental treatment appeared to quell the immune system's assaults on the body's insulin-production machinery. The authors of the new study call their experimental treatment "an appealing strategy for prevention," both in the earliest stages of Type-1 diabetes and in children who are at high genetic risk of developing the disease. The different metabolic trajectories of subjects in the trial's control group and its active arm were evident at three months — the earliest point at which a surrogate marker for insulin production was measured. The report of the early-stage clinical trial, published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine, offers some preliminary reassurance that immunotherapy could be used safely in this growing population. Researchers have been wary of pursuing the strategy in diabetes, worried that it could accelerate or strengthen the immune system's attack on insulin-producing pancreatic cells, or cause dangerous allergic reactions. In the current study, injections of an immunotherapeutic agent caused no detectable worrisome response -- not even redness or swelling at the site of injection — prompting the authors to declare its safety profile "very favorable." Recent years have seen progress in the bid to develop chemical mimics of allergens that train and reassure the defenders of the immune system rather than inflame and encourage them. The approach, called antigen-specific immunotherapy, has seen growing success in the treatment of allergies to common foods, Continue reading >>

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Image Point Fr/Shutterstock A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes means a lifetime of constant diligence. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 usually develops early in life. Those diagnosed have to check blood sugar several times a day and take insulin as needed; the process is difficult, expensive, and potentially dangerous. That helps explain the excitement about a potential cure for type 1 diabetes using an already approved treatment. Doctors diagnose more than 18,000 children and teens with type 1 diabetes every year, according to the CDC. These kids lack the ability to make enough insulin, the hormone that processes blood sugar. Using insulin injections to control blood sugar with insulin is tricky because diet, exercise, and stress can quickly alter levels. Without enough insulin, kidney, heart, and nerve damage can be the result. Get too much, and blood sugar levels will plummet dangerously low. (This is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.) Researchers in Israel have tried treating type 1 diabetics with an immune system protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha-1)—it helps target germs. Normally, insulin gets lower and lower over time in diabetics, but extra alpha-1 seems to help the body produce more. Researchers gave 12 recently diagnosed type 1 diabetics an alpha-1 drip once a week for eight weeks in a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. For a year and counting following treatment, two of the participants have been making more of their own insulin. Another three saw only minor decreases—which is a good sign. “Compared to the natural course of the disease, which is downhill, even a flat line is considered success,” says study co-author Eli C. Lewis, PhD, biochemical and pharmacology professor at Ben-Gurion University of the N Continue reading >>

Could The Tb Vaccine Cure Type 1 Diabetes? Scientists ‘discover Bcg Jab Can Reverse The Disease’

Could The Tb Vaccine Cure Type 1 Diabetes? Scientists ‘discover Bcg Jab Can Reverse The Disease’

REPEAT doses of the TB vaccine could reverse type 1 diabetes, scientists believe - raising hopes of a potential cure. The BCG jab could reset the immune system, to stop the underlying cause of the disease, new findings suggest. Getty Images Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, that prevents the body from producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body break down glucose in the blood, to give you energy. It's often described as the key that unlocks the door to the body's cells. Once that door is unlocked and glucose can enter, the body's cells can use it as fuel. Without insulin there's no key to unlock the door, and glucose builds up in the blood. Type 1 diabetes develops when the insulin-producing cells in the body have been destroyed, when the immune system mistakes those cells as an infection and destroys them. Now, a team of experts at Massachusetts General Hospital, believe the BCG jab could reverse that damage caused to the insulin-producing cells. In a study carried out in mice, scientists were able to successfully reverse the condition in rodents who had advanced type 1 diabetes. The jab is currently given to children aged 13 at school as part of the NHS immunisation programme. But, scientists now believe repeat doses could be the key to curing type 1 diabetes. Dr Denise Faustman, who led the trial, said the vaccine could trigger a permanent change to the genes in the body that restores immune cells, called Tregs. Tregs are known as the immune system's "brakes", and normally work to stop the body mistakenly attacking itself. By "turning on" the brakes it's possible to stop the immune system attacking the pancreas, causing type 1 diabetes. The theory could also work with other autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, the researchers sai Continue reading >>

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

With all the research on diabetes and advances in diabetes treatments, it's tempting to think someone has surely found a diabetes cure by now. But the reality is that there is no cure for diabetes -- neither type 1 diabetes nor type 2 diabetes. (Although lifestyle changes can achieve remission in type 2 diabetes in some cases.) However, there are treatments, including simple things you can do daily, that make a big difference. No. Natural therapies such as deep abdominal breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and biofeedback can help relieve stress. And emotional stress affects your blood sugar levels. So learning to relax is important in managing your diabetes. Supplements don't cure diabetes, either. Some natural supplements may interact dangerously with your diabetes medication. Others have been shown to help improve your diabetes, but always check with your doctor before taking any supplement. Be skeptical about claims of a diabetes cure. A genuine cure will have been tested repeatedly in clinical trials with clear success. Even though there's no diabetes cure, diabetes can be treated and controlled, and some people may go into remission. To manage diabetes effectively, you need to do the following: Manage your blood sugar levels. Know what to do to help keep them as near to normal as possible every day: Check your glucose levels frequently. Take your diabetes medicine regularly. And balance your food intake with medication, exercise, stress management, and good sleep habits. Plan what you eat at each meal. Stick to your diabetes eating plan as often as possible. Bring healthy snacks with you. You’ll be less likely to snack on empty calories. Exercise regularly. Exercise helps you keep you fit, burns calories, and helps normalize your blood gluc Continue reading >>

Have Scientists Found A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes? Experts Halt The Disease By Implanting Cells That Help Produce Insulin

Have Scientists Found A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes? Experts Halt The Disease By Implanting Cells That Help Produce Insulin

A cure for Type 1 diabetes is a step closer after scientists managed to halt the condition for at least six months thanks to insulin-producing cells. Experts from US hospitals and institutions including Harvard University managed to transplant cells into mice, which immediately began producing insulin. The team was also able to show they could prevent the cells being rendered useless by the body's own immune system, which was effectively 'switched off' thanks to scientific work. It means a cure for Type 1 diabetes - which affects 400,000 people in the UK - could be much closer. Scientists are now working to replicate the results in people with the condition. The findings build on the news at the end of 2014 that experts had discovered how to make huge quantities of insulin-producing cells. The man who led that breakthrough - Harvard professor Doug Melton who has been trying to find a cure for the disease since his son Sam was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes as a baby - also worked on the new studies. During the study, experts were able to create a newly-modified alginate material to encapsulate human pancreatic islet cells - a way of making the body adopt them. The modified alginate, a material originally derived from brown algae, was used to prevent the body triggering an immune response which can lead to the build-up of scar tissue and the cells ultimately being rendered useless. Scientists created a library of almost 800 alginate derivatives and evaluated the immune response to each of them. This led them to focus on one called triazole-thiomorpholine dioxide (TMTD), which had a minimal immune response in mice and large animals. The researchers then implanted human islet cells encapsulated in TMTD in mice, which provided the success for the study. The human islet cell Continue reading >>

Scientists Believe They're Close To A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Scientists Believe They're Close To A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Scientists believe they’re closing in on a cure for Type 1 diabetes, and perhaps making daily insulin shots a thing of the past for patients, according to studies published Monday. Researchers from MIT, Harvard and Boston Children’s Hospital said they’re on the verge of developing replacements for pancreatic cells that are mysteriously destroyed by a patient’s own body — thus making it impossible to make insulin, which regulates blood sugar levels. Scientists, writing in the journals Nature Medicine and Nature Biotechnology, said they’ve engineered material from brown algae that could work for up to six months at a time — in a huge relief from daily doses of insulin, whether by injection or insulin pump. “We are excited by these results, and are working hard to advance this technology to the clinic,” said Daniel Anderson, an MIT chemical engineering professor. Type 1 diabetes, previously known as juvenile diabetes, afflicts about 1.25 million Americans, and about 200,000 of them are under 20, according to a CDC report in 2014. Type 1 diabetes is believed to have a genetic connection and is not related to weight or lifestyle, as is Type 2 diabetes. “Encapsulation therapies have the potential to be groundbreaking for people with (Type 1 diabetes),” said Julia Greenstein, vice president of discovery research of the JDRF, formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. “These treatments aim to effectively establish long-term insulin independence and eliminate the daily burden of managing the disease for months, possibly years, at a time without the need for immune suppression.” Continue reading >>

Harvard And Mit Close To ‘cure’ For Type 1 Diabetes Which Will End Daily Injections

Harvard And Mit Close To ‘cure’ For Type 1 Diabetes Which Will End Daily Injections

A cure for type 1 diabetes is closer than ever after scientists showed they can switch off the disease for six months in animals – which would equate to several years in humans. In 2014, researchers at Harvard University discovered how to make huge quantities of insulin-producing cells, in a breakthrough hailed as significant as antibiotics. Now a team at MIT has proven that planting the cells into mice can completely restore insulin function for a long time. "These treatments aim to effectively establish long-term insulin independence and eliminate the daily burden of managing the disease for months, possibly years, at a time" Julia Greenstein JDRF, the type 1 diabetes research charity It could mean the end of daily insulin injections for the 400,000 people in Britain living with Type 1 diabetes. Instead they would simply need a transfusion of engineered cells every few years. Researchers say human trials are just a few years away. “We are excited by these results, and are working hard to advance this technology to the clinic,” said Dr Daniel Anderson, professor of applied biology at MIT. “These results lay the groundwork for future human studies using these formulations with the goal of achieving long-term replacement therapy for type one diabetes. “We believe (the cells) have the potential to provide insulin independence for patients suffering from this disease. "It has the potential to provide diabetics with a new pancreas that is protected from the immune system, which would allow them to control their blood sugar without taking drugs. That’s the dream.” Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin - the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. If the amount of glucose in the blood is too high it ca Continue reading >>

Cure For Type 1 Diabetes A Step Closer

Cure For Type 1 Diabetes A Step Closer

Research into a possible cure for type 1 diabetes has taken an "important step forward," according to the latest research by scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The study, which was published in journals Nature Medicine and Nature Biotechnology on Monday, builds on work by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute which last year discovered a way of creating beta cells (whose primary function is to store and release insulin) which could then be implanted in mice and, it is hoped in future, humans with diabetes. Now, in the latest development, scientists and researchers at MIT and Harvard, in collaboration with other university experts, have developed an implantable device that could prevent those implanted insulin-producing cells from being attacked by the immune system for six months – effectively allowing the insulin-producing cells to do their job. Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system kills off the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Daily injections of insulin are the primary treatment, but are only partially successful in regulating patients' metabolism. If a device could be implanted into diabetics that could prevent those insulin-producing cells from being attacked, it could be a huge leap forward in terms of research. The results could have an impact on health provision around the world as diabetes ranks as one of the leading causes of death in America. Type 1 diabetes differs from type 2, where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. Pregnant women can also develop a usually more short-term form of gestational diabetes. Diabetes affect Continue reading >>

Scientists Have Cured Diabetes In Mice, Marking A Major Breakthrough In Tackling The Disease

Scientists Have Cured Diabetes In Mice, Marking A Major Breakthrough In Tackling The Disease

Unable to playback video Scientists in the United States announced the breakthrough, which uses a novel approach that may eliminate Type 1 diabetes and see painful insulin injections become a thing of the past. University of Texas Health Science Centre doctors used a virus as a carrier to introduce insulin-producing genes into the pancreas of rodent subjects. Professor Ralph DeFronzo said researchers altered cells so they secreted insulin, but only in response to glucose — mimicking the behaviour of the body’s beta cells. Source:Supplied This study bypasses the autoimmune system by altering other pancreatic cells so they can coexist with immune defences — unlike beta cells, which are rejected in Type 1 patients. At the moment, Type 1 diabetes is treated by monitoring glucose levels and injecting artificial insulin up to four times a day. While technology has made management of the condition easier, a cure has been elusive — until now. The patent’s co-inventor Professor Bruno Doiron said the results had never been seen before. “It worked perfectly,” Dr Doiron said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects.” Dr Doiron predicted the same low-risk response in humans. “If a Type 1 diabetic has been living with these cells for 30, 40 or 50 years, and all we’re getting them to do is secrete insulin, we expect there to be no adverse immune response.” Dr DeFronzo said the same method of treatment has been approved almost 50 times by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat various conditions, including rare childhood diseases. While it’s early days, the potential applications are promising and the researchers will now conduct a study on larger animals before any move to human trials. Source:News Limited Type 2 diabetes is the fastest-gro Continue reading >>

Clinical Trials And The Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Clinical Trials And The Type 1 Diabetes Cure

WRITTEN BY: Stephen Gitelman, MD I am often asked the question, “Where is the cure for Type 1 diabetes (T1D)?” For those with long-standing diabetes, we are very close to replicating insulin producing beta cell functionality or the actual replacement of those cells — either with closed loop systems with continuous glucose sensor driving an insulin pump, or use of replacement beta cells derived from stem cells. However, as a Pediatrician, I think the ultimate cure for T1D will be prevention. Why can’t we screen and predict who is at risk, and then prevent someone from getting Type 1 diabetes in the first place? It turns out that T1D occurs in about 1 in 300 people in the general population, but if you already have someone in your family with diabetes, like a brother or sister, then the risk jumps to a 1 in 20 chance of developing Type 1 diabetes. This is why researchers in an NIH sponsored international research effort called TrialNet have been focusing prevention efforts on families with at least one T1D. T1D results from both underlying genetic risk and environmental exposures, but researchers are still working to determine these specific factors. Thanks to some of this work, we now have the ability to predict who will get T1D, in some cases as long as 10-20 years before it happens (see figure). Researchers use three different pieces of information for prediction. First, we look at the immune system. This is done with a simple blood test, measuring up to five different autoantibodies that the immune system might produce against beta cells. If no abnormality is found, then your risk of developing Type 1 diabetes in the near future is very low. However, if there is any abnormality found in the antibody profile, then additional tests are necessary to further defin Continue reading >>

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

Dreaming of a cure for diabetes: Fact or Fiction? With tears in her eyes but a faint smile, Camp Director Maura Prescott, approached the podium. I would like to say that I am overjoyed that we are closing our Diabetes Camp with the announcement from the CDC that Type 1 Diabetes has now been eradicated, and that the services of our camp are no longer needed. I look forward to continuing to work in the diabetes world, but with the older Type 2 population, helping to fine tune their diabetes control with the Bionic Pancreas and increase their quality of life and time on this earth. I have given my life to working with and improving the lives of those with diabetes, and I will continue to do so. By the end of my life, I hope to see that there is not one single person with diabetes on this planet, and that our children and grandchildren are taught about this debilitating chronic illness in history class. We have come so far since the 1920’s, where we saw the discovery of insulin. We have come to the point of cure. Here, in 2056, we can say that on the horizon, we can see a world without diabetes. I stand before you today in awe at the shear genius of scientists who have worked tirelessly in efforts to make this day come. From the introduction of the vaccine for Type 1 diabetes in 2032, we have seen worldwide eradication similar to that seen many years ago with polio. The camp closes because there are no more children with diabetes to attend it, and is that not what we have all been working for? Honestly, I never expected to be able to say those words in my lifetime. But here we are. Tania Prescott read the scribbled notes from her mother’s speech some 25 years before. She had just read a news article online explaining how there are now only a few people left on the earth Continue reading >>

Cure For Diabetes: Breakthrough Could End Insulin Shots For Good

Cure For Diabetes: Breakthrough Could End Insulin Shots For Good

A new scientific breakthrough could have found the cure for diabetes. The breakthrough has cured diabetes in mice – with no side effects. The research comes from a UT Health San Antonio report which describes the process as using a gene transfer which can increase the types of cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Researchers said they aim to reach human clinical trials within the next three years. “It worked perfectly,” assistant professor of medicine at UT Health, Dr Bruno Diron said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects. That’s never been seen. “But it’s a mouse model, so caution is needed. We want to bring this to large animals that are closer to humans in physiology of the endocrine system.” Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Diabetes at UT Health described how the therapy works: “The pancreas has many other cell types besides beta cells, and our approach is to alter these cells so that they start to secrete insulin, but only in response to glucose [sugar]. This is basically just like beta cells.” Insulin, which diabetic people take injections of in order to keep their blood sugar levels at bay, are made up of beta cells. In Type 1 diabetes, these cells are destroyed by the immune system and so the patient is left without insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the beta cells fail and insulin decreases – with Type 2 the body also does not use insulin efficiently. If the procedure can be replicated successfully in humans, this could have the potential to cure Type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Texas Scientists Closer To Diabetes Cure With Unconventional Approach

Texas Scientists Closer To Diabetes Cure With Unconventional Approach

99 Health researchers at the University of Texas think they have found a way to trick the body into curing Type 1 diabetes. The immune system of a person with diabetes kills off useful “beta” cells, but the UT researchers say they have found a way to make other cells in the pancreas perform the necessary work. Their approach, announced earlier this month in the academic journal Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, not only would have implications for Type 1, formerly called juvenile diabetes, but also could help treat the far more common Type 2 variety, also known as adult-onset diabetes. The researchers have cured mice, which are genetically similar to people but different enough that new rounds of animal testing — and millions of dollars more — are needed before human trials can begin. The researchers’ approach is sure to garner skeptics, at least in part because it is a significant departure from the many other attempts at curing diabetes, which typically involve transplanting new cells and/or suppressing the immune system’s attempts to kill off useful ones. By contrast, “we’re taking a cell that is already present in the body — it’s there, and it’s happy — and programming it to secrete insulin, without changing it otherwise,” said Ralph DeFronzo, chief of the diabetes research at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio. Diabetes is a disease characterized by a person’s inability to process carbohydrates, a condition that if untreated can lead to often-catastrophic health consequences: lethargy, diminished eyesight, heart attacks, strokes, blindness and a loss of circulation in the feet that could lead to amputation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that in 2014, about 29 million Americans – almost 1 in 10 – Continue reading >>

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