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How Can You Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes?

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

You can help reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes by understanding your risk and making changes to your lifestyle. Common risk factors include increased weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride (blood fat) levels. Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Here are some tips to help you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. Check your risk of diabetes. Take the Life! risk assessment test and learn more about your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A 12+ score indicates that you are at high risk and may be eligible for the Life! program - a free Victorian lifestyle modification program that helps you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or call 13 RISK (13 7475). Manage your weight. Excess body fat, particularly if stored around the abdomen, can increase the body’s resistance to the hormone insulin. This can lead to type 2 diabetes. Exercise regularly. Moderate physical activity on most days of the week helps manage weight, reduce blood glucose levels and may also improve blood pressure and cholesterol. Eat a balanced, healthy diet. Reduce the amount of fat in your diet, especially saturated and trans fats. Eat more fruit, vegetables and high-fibre foods. Cut back on salt. Limit takeaway and processed foods. ‘Convenience meals’ are usually high in salt, fat and kilojoules. It’s best to cook for yourself using fresh ingredients whenever possible. Limit your alcohol intake. Too much alcohol can lead to weight gain and may increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should have no more than two standard drinks a day and women should have no more than one. Quit smoking. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers. Control your blood pressure. Most people can do th Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

The Health Mistake Fit Women Make

The Health Mistake Fit Women Make

Lower Your Diabetes Risk Do you go to the gym after sitting at your desk all day? Run or bike outside regularly? Are you watching your weight? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may be at risk for type 2 diabetes. What the...? Turns out that the disease is a hidden threat to otherwise healthy women. "Even those who are slim and physically fit may be at risk," says Leonid Poretsky, MD, director of the Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. That's something many people, and even some doctors, are not aware of. In fact, the majority of us don't really understand what diabetes is and the havoc it can cause. So here's the deal: Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin, a hormone that helps cells convert both sugars and starches (aka glucose) into energy, and doesn't respond properly to the insulin it does make. Glucose then builds up in the blood, which can lead to a host of complications, including heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. Even scarier is that nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, and almost 6 million of them are undiagnosed, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The incidence is expected to rise significantly: Some experts estimate that the number of Americans with type 2 diabetes will double in the next 25 years. "Diabetes is an epidemic," Dr. Poretsky says. Fortunately, you can help protect yourself. We're not talking about difficult, time-consuming lifestyle changes, but simple, everyday tweaks to your routine that can help reduce your risk of the disease and boost your overall health. Make these nine smart moves today. Keeping up with the kids—a reality TV show no one would watch! How to do it IRL provided by Emergen-C 9 Ways Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

5 Steps To Lower Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

5 Steps To Lower Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

The statistics are concerning: Diabetes affects about 26 million U.S. adults—almost 11 million of whom are 65 or older. Without dramatic lifestyle changes, more than one-third of Americans will have diabetes by 2050, predicts the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). By making five healthy lifestyle changes associated with weight, nutrition, activity, smoking and alcohol, you can dramatically lower your diabetes risk, suggests new research. Each factor alone reduces diabetes risk by more than 30 percent. Together, they're associated with lowering risk by 72 percent for men and 80 percent for women. About the study The analysis, by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), marks the first time a combination of five specific lifestyle factors and their effects on type 2 diabetes has been put to the test so comprehensively. In the past, researchers focused mainly on the impact of individual factors. Research on combined factors has been limited. For this latest analysis, investigators gathered data from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, an unrelated study that tracked the lifestyle habits of more than 200,000 healthy men and women in the United States. At the beginning of this study, participants ranging in age from 50 to 71 completed a survey about their lifestyle habits. The new study measured the number of diabetes cases that had developed among participants 11 years later. The new study had some limitations, most notably that the study participants didn't truly represent the U.S. population. When the study began, most participants were healthier and weighed less than the typical American in the same age range. What's more, the study subjects were mostly Caucasian, so the data may not be relevant for African Americans and Hispanics. Another limitation was Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

How Does Exercise Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

How Does Exercise Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that by 2050, one in three American adults could have diabetes. Exercise, whether aerobic or resistance-based such as weight training, is considered one of the most effective lifestyle habits individuals at risk can adopt to prevent potential cases from becoming actual cases. It has been shown that exercise has a greater protective effect for those at highest risk. In some instances, exercise has a greater beneficial effect than dietary modifications or even weight loss on the management of blood sugar. Effects on Blood Sugar Regulation Exercise causes skeletal muscle to be more sensitive to insulin, the chemical signal that tells cells to absorb glucose. As a result, exercise speeds the clearance of glucose out of the blood and into skeletal muscle cells, which need glucose in higher quantities during increased activity. Exercise also increases blood flow to muscles, thereby making more glucose available for the muscles to absorb. In older individuals, decreased insulin sensitivity, which is a lowered responsiveness of cells to insulin, is common. This is associated primarily with decreased levels of physical activity and is readily reversed through resumption or increase in exercise levels. There is an alternate pathway, carried out by an enzyme called AMP kinase, that initiates glucose transport from blood to cells without the use of insulin. This is especially important and helpful in light of the prevalence of insulin resistance in those at risk for diabetes. Exercise is found to increase levels of AMP kinase. Certain storage and distribution patterns of fat are seen as red flags for health risks. Individuals who have the tendency to store fat around the abdomen are often found to have other health risk facto Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Risk Of Diabetes Complications

How To Lower Your Risk Of Diabetes Complications

Follow a simple daily care plan to help keep complications away. Sticking your finger each day can help you and your doctor see if your blood sugar is under control. Adjustments can be made to manage it better if it isnt. Ask your doctor when to check, how often, and what your target numbers should be. Keep a log with dates, times, and blood sugar numbers to share with your care team. Ask what steps you can take to adjust your routine when your blood sugar levels are off-target. Eating well can help you keep a healthy weight and lower your cholesterol or blood pressure. A nutritionist or diabetes educator can help you create a meal plan that fits with your lifestyle. Too little sleep raises your chances of weight gain and obesity. People who sleep for 7 1/2 to 8 1/2 hours also seem to have better control of their blood sugar. High blood sugar can damage the nerves in your foot and cut blood flow in your feet. Foot sores that aren't treated can lead to serious infections. You may not feel them right away. Check your feet daily, especially between the toes. Look for blisters, broken skin, or warm or red spots. If you have a wound, treat it right away and keep your eye on it. Dont hesitate to call your doctor if things dont get better or you see signs of infection. Diabetes increases your chance of gum disease and infection. Brush well with a soft-bristled brush at least twice a day. You should also floss once or more each day. At least twice a year, if your doctor advises it, you should: Get an A1c test to measure your average blood sugar levels for the previous 2 or 3 months. See your dentist for teeth cleaning and a checkup. At least once a year, if your doctor advises it, you should get a: Continue reading >>

Take Steps To Prevent Type2diabetes

Take Steps To Prevent Type2diabetes

Diabetes (dy-ah-BEE-teez) is a leading cause of disability and death in the United States. Diabetes increases the risk of serious health problems like: The good news is that you can do a lot to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes, including: Next section Types of Diabetes 1 of 9 sections Diabetes means you have glucose (sugar) levels in your blood that are higher than usual. Your body depends on glucose for energy. When you eat, most of the food turns into glucose. Your blood carries the glucose to other parts of your body. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble turning glucose into energy. Instead of being used by your body, the glucose builds up in your blood and your body is starved of energy. Diabetes is a chronic (long-term) condition. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. People who are overweight are more likely to get type2diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a problem with the immune system (the system that helps fight infection). Right now, theres no way to prevent type 1 diabetes. Gestational (jes-TAY-shon-al) diabetes is a type of diabetes that some women develop during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of health problems for you and your baby. For example, gestational diabetes can make it more likely that youll develop type 2 diabetes after pregnancy. Next section Am I at Risk? Previous section Overview 2 of 9 sections You may be at risk for type 2 diabetes if you: Next section Cost and Insurance Previous section Symptoms 5 of 9 sections Under the Affordable Care Act , the health care reform law passed in 2010, insurance plans must cover: Diabetes screening for adults with high blood pressure Diet counseling for adults at higher risk for chronic disease Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get t Continue reading >>

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Reduce Portion Sizes Portion size is the amount of food you eat, such as 1 cup of fruit or 6 ounces of meat. If you are trying to eat smaller portions, eat a half of a bagel instead of a whole bagel or have a 3-ounce hamburger instead of a 6-ounce hamburger. Three ounces is about the size of your fist or a deck of cards. Put less on your plate, Nate. 1. Drink a large glass of water 10 minutes before your meal so you feel less hungry. 2. Keep meat, chicken, turkey, and fish portions to about 3 ounces. 3. Share one dessert. Eat a small meal, Lucille. 4. Use teaspoons, salad forks, or child-size forks, spoons, and knives to help you take smaller bites and eat less. 5. Make less food look like more by serving your meal on a salad or breakfast plate. 6. Eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to send a signal to your brain that you are full. 7. Listen to music while you eat instead of watching TV (people tend to eat more while watching TV). How much should I eat? Try filling your plate like this: 1/4 protein 1/4 grains 1/2 vegetables and fruit dairy (low-fat or skim milk) Move More Each Day Find ways to be more active each day. Try to be active for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Walking is a great way to get started and you can do it almost anywhere at any time. Bike riding, swimming, and dancing are also good ways to move more. If you are looking for a safe place to be active, contact your local parks department or health department to ask about walking maps, community centers, and nearby parks. Dance it away, Faye. 8. Show your kids the dances you used to do when you were their age. 9. Turn up the music and jam while doing household chores. 10. Work out with a video that shows you how to get active. Let's go, Flo. 11. Deliver a message in person to a co-worke Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Why Coffee May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Why Coffee May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Chinese Researchers Zero in on Coffee Substances That May Explain the Benefit Jan. 13, 2012 -- Coffee drinking has been linked with a reduced risk of diabetes , and now Chinese researchers think they may know why. Three compounds found in coffee seem to block the toxic accumulation of a protein linked with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes . ''We found three major coffee compounds can reverse this toxic process and may explain why coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes ," says researcher Kun Huang, PhD, a professor of biological pharmacy at the Huazhong University of Science & Technology. Previous studies have found that people who drink four or more cups of coffee a day have a 50% lower risk of getting type 2 diabetes . The new study is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Coffee and Diabetes Risk: Explaining Why It May Work Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. In those who have it, the body does not have enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin . The hormone insulin , made by the pancreas , is crucial to move glucose to the cells for energy. Other researchers have linked the ''misfolding'' of a protein called hIAPP (human islet amyloid polypeptide) with an increased risk of diabetes . HIAPP is similar to the amyloid protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease , Huang says. When these HIAPP deposits accumulate, they can lead to the death of cells in the pancreas , Huang tells WebMD. The Chinese researchers looked at three major active compounds in coffee and their effect on stopping the toxic accumulation of the protein: "We exposed hIAPP to coffee extracts, and found caffeine , caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid all inhibited the formation of toxic hIAPP amyloid and protected the pancreatic cells," Huang Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Cut Your Risk Of Diabetes

5 Ways To Cut Your Risk Of Diabetes

The older we get, the more likely we are to get diabetes, specifically type 2. Around 1 in 7 older people have diabetes and these numbers are likely to rise. Although no-one completely understands the causes of diabetes, if you control the risk factors, you can reduce your chances of getting it. The facts about diabetes It's estimated that 4.5 million people are living with diabetes in the UK. A further 1.1 million people may have diabetes but haven't been diagnosed. 9 out of 10 of these cases are type 2 diabetes, the preventable form of the condition. Although we don’t know the causes, there are a number of factors that can increase your chance of developing type 2 diabetes, so by taking simple steps, you can lower your chances of getting it. Quite simply, shedding pounds will drastically reduce your chances of getting type 2 diabetes. 80% of people who have diabetes are overweight, so if you are overweight or obese, it’s time to think about cutting back. A good measure is your waist size. More than 31.5 inches (80cm) for a woman and 37 inches (94cm) for a man and you need to start thinking about cutting back. It goes without saying that increasing the amount of time you spend exercising will make you feel better and help towards losing weight. Research has found that regular exercise can reduce your risk of developing by up to 64%, so it is backed up by science. Talk to your GP for an idea of some suitable exercises for you. Most people are aware of smoking’s link to cancer, but not as many understand how it’s connected to diabetes. Smoking has been proven to increase blood pressure levels, which are known to be a major cause of diabetes. A diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt and contains a lot of fruit and veg will reduce your cholesterol levels – a sim Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

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