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How Can You Reduce The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Around three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. However you’ve found out you’re at risk – and knowing is a big first step – the important thing to do now is take action to lower your risk. Evidence shows the best way to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes is by: eating better moving more reducing your weight if you’re overweight Where do I start? The key is to find what works for you, fits in with your day and you enjoy. 1. Set clear goals Setting goals can help you break down what you need to do and how to do it. Use our Action Plan (PDF, 66KB)to set healthy goals and keep aFood and activity diary (PDF, 40KB)to keep you on track. 2. Plan ahead It’s helpful to plan meals for the week ahead especially when we all lead busy lives. This can help you reach your goal to eat better and stick to a budget. 3. Start to make healthy changes Time to put your plan into action. Each healthy choice you make is helping you to achieve your goal. If you find it hard, don’t give up – start again tomorrow. 4. Be creative Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring. Take the opportunity to try new recipes and new food. 5. Sleep well Get a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that if you are tired you feel hungrier and are more likely to want fatty and sugary foods. This can make it harder to stick to your goals. What changes can I make to eat better? Eating better doesn’t have to mean boring or tasteless. We've got plenty of tools, tips and recipes to help you eat healthier. We've got healthier versions of your favourite recipes, or follow our videos and learn to cook a new recipe. How can I move more every day? Getting active and staying active will reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, and you’ll feel great too. If you're not sur Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Tweet When people talk about prevention of diabetes, it is usually about preventing type 2 diabetes. In the majority of cases, type 2 diabetes is brought on by lifestyle factors which can often be prevented. These include an unbalanced diet, lack of activity, lack of sleep, stress, smoking and alcohol. By making lifestyles changes, you can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes prevention overview Leading doctors and researchers point to excessive levels of insulin as the likely reason why insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes develops. Strategies such as low-carb diets and exercise help to reduce levels of insulin and are therefore effective for preventing type 2 diabetes from developing. There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, some of which are preventable, such as weight gain around the middle (central obesity), high cholesterol/triglyceride levels and high blood pressure. Losing weight, adopting more activity into your day, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol intake can also help towards lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and improving your all-round health. Diet and preventing type 2 diabetes Diet is the most important part of lifestyle change. The adage that you can’t outrun a bad diet is true. It is much easier to lose weight on a good diet even if you are struggling to do exercise, than it is through exercise if you’re eating a poor diet. Effective diets to prevent type 2 diabetes are those that do not cause your body to produce a lot of insulin. Carbohydrate has the biggest demand on insulin and so any diet that helps reduce carbohydrate intake will help towards reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Cutting out sugary food and drink and refined grains such as white bread and white rice is a good Continue reading >>

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Piggybacking the obesity epidemic, diabetes rates continue to surge. On June 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new and alarming statistics on diabetes. An estimated 29 million Americans have the disease, a nearly 12 percent increase from the 26 million diabetics in 2010. One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes. The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. The good news is type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the antidiabetes drug metformin. 7 tips to help reduce your risk: Lose excess body fat. Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent. Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar. Drink water. Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls. Move your body. Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

You can help reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes by understanding your risk and making changes to your lifestyle. Common risk factors include increased weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride (blood fat) levels. Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Here are some tips to help you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. Check your risk of diabetes. Take the Life! risk assessment test and learn more about your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A 12+ score indicates that you are at high risk and may be eligible for the Life! program - a free Victorian lifestyle modification program that helps you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or call 13 RISK (13 7475). Manage your weight. Excess body fat, particularly if stored around the abdomen, can increase the body’s resistance to the hormone insulin. This can lead to type 2 diabetes. Exercise regularly. Moderate physical activity on most days of the week helps manage weight, reduce blood glucose levels and may also improve blood pressure and cholesterol. Eat a balanced, healthy diet. Reduce the amount of fat in your diet, especially saturated and trans fats. Eat more fruit, vegetables and high-fibre foods. Cut back on salt. Limit takeaway and processed foods. ‘Convenience meals’ are usually high in salt, fat and kilojoules. It’s best to cook for yourself using fresh ingredients whenever possible. Limit your alcohol intake. Too much alcohol can lead to weight gain and may increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should have no more than two standard drinks a day and women should have no more than one. Quit smoking. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers. Control your blood pressure. Most people can do th Continue reading >>

5 Steps To Lower Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

5 Steps To Lower Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

The statistics are concerning: Diabetes affects about 26 million U.S. adults—almost 11 million of whom are 65 or older. Without dramatic lifestyle changes, more than one-third of Americans will have diabetes by 2050, predicts the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). By making five healthy lifestyle changes associated with weight, nutrition, activity, smoking and alcohol, you can dramatically lower your diabetes risk, suggests new research. Each factor alone reduces diabetes risk by more than 30 percent. Together, they're associated with lowering risk by 72 percent for men and 80 percent for women. About the study The analysis, by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), marks the first time a combination of five specific lifestyle factors and their effects on type 2 diabetes has been put to the test so comprehensively. In the past, researchers focused mainly on the impact of individual factors. Research on combined factors has been limited. For this latest analysis, investigators gathered data from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, an unrelated study that tracked the lifestyle habits of more than 200,000 healthy men and women in the United States. At the beginning of this study, participants ranging in age from 50 to 71 completed a survey about their lifestyle habits. The new study measured the number of diabetes cases that had developed among participants 11 years later. The new study had some limitations, most notably that the study participants didn't truly represent the U.S. population. When the study began, most participants were healthier and weighed less than the typical American in the same age range. What's more, the study subjects were mostly Caucasian, so the data may not be relevant for African Americans and Hispanics. Another limitation was Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Reduce Your Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Ways To Reduce Your Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Ways to Reduce Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Sunrise Senior Living | August 17, 2016 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn Sharethis Certain lifestyle choices can help reduce your risk for type 2 diabetes. Type1 diabetes is not preventable because doctors are still not sure what causes it. There are ways to help reduce your risk for developing Type 2. Genes play a role, but lifestyle factors could influence it even more.Here are five positive changes to help reduce one's risk for developing Type 2 diabetes: According to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, highly processed carbohydrates and refined sugars are linked to an increased risk of diabetes . To lower your chances, eliminate those foods from your diet. Eating more fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as whole grains, reduced-fat dairy products and lean meats makes a difference in overall health. Physical activity is key for maintaining your physical and mental health. It strengthens your heart, muscles and bones, relieves stress and even keeps your blood glucose, blood pressure and HDL cholesterol levels well balanced, according to the American Diabetes Association. This, in turn can lower your risk for heart disease, stroke, pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes .Older adults are recommended to devote at least 150 minutes per week of aerobic activity, plus two days dedicated to strength-training exercises. Being overweight or obese can increase your chances of developing heart disease, high blood pressure, bone issues and Type 2 diabetes. By switching to a healthy diet and committingmore time to fitness, you can maintain a healthy weight. Just remember: A healthy target weight varies from person to person. That's why the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)suggests visi Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

5 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive: October 2009 Given the serious consequences emanating from insulin resistance and Type-2 diabetes, preventing this disease is certainly our best weapon in reducing the damage caused by a surplus of blood sugar. Luckily for us, the preventive potential is extraordinary: Adopting a healthy lifestyle can prevent up to 90 percent of Type-2 diabetes cases! To see how we can reduce the risk of diabetes, let us review some lifestyle factors. 1. Maintain a healthy body weight Given that excess weight and obesity are instrumental in the development of Type-2 diabetes, maintaining a normal body weight is an essential aspect of any preventive approach. The most spectacular illustration of how weight loss can influence the risk of diabetes is undoubtedly the effect of bariatric surgery (reducing stomach size) on morbidly obese people. Radically reducing the size of the stomach rapidly decreases obesity and almost completely eliminates Type-2 diabetes! However, it is neither necessary nor desirable to undergo this type of surgery to reap the benefits of weight loss: Losing just 5 kg, even over several years, can reduce the risk of diabetes by 50%! At a time when overweight has become the norm rather than the exception, Type-2 diabetes undoubtedly illustrates the dangers of excess weight and the need to be as slim as possible in order to prevent this disease. 2. Reduce intake of high-sugar foods You can also significantly reduce the risk of diabetes by paying particular attention to the amount and especially the type of carbohydrates: that is, the sugar in your diet. There are three main types of carbohydrates. ‘ The first is simple sugars ‘ like those in fruits, dairy products, maple syrup, or honey ‘ and sugars added to various products sold in grocery Continue reading >>

Take Steps To Prevent Type2diabetes

Take Steps To Prevent Type2diabetes

Diabetes (dy-ah-BEE-teez) is a leading cause of disability and death in the United States. Diabetes increases the risk of serious health problems like: The good news is that you can do a lot to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes, including: Next section Types of Diabetes 1 of 9 sections Diabetes means you have glucose (sugar) levels in your blood that are higher than usual. Your body depends on glucose for energy. When you eat, most of the food turns into glucose. Your blood carries the glucose to other parts of your body. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble turning glucose into energy. Instead of being used by your body, the glucose builds up in your blood and your body is starved of energy. Diabetes is a chronic (long-term) condition. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. People who are overweight are more likely to get type2diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a problem with the immune system (the system that helps fight infection). Right now, theres no way to prevent type 1 diabetes. Gestational (jes-TAY-shon-al) diabetes is a type of diabetes that some women develop during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of health problems for you and your baby. For example, gestational diabetes can make it more likely that youll develop type 2 diabetes after pregnancy. Next section Am I at Risk? Previous section Overview 2 of 9 sections You may be at risk for type 2 diabetes if you: Next section Cost and Insurance Previous section Symptoms 5 of 9 sections Under the Affordable Care Act , the health care reform law passed in 2010, insurance plans must cover: Diabetes screening for adults with high blood pressure Diet counseling for adults at higher risk for chronic disease Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

You may be able to prevent type 2 diabetes. Even if you have several of the risk factors and even if you’ve been told you have pre-diabetes, you can take action and reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Don’t delay: if you’ve been told that you’re at risk of developing diabetes, get started as soon as possible. Your healthcare provider can help you develop a plan, but it should include: Getting to—and staying at—a healthy weight: Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, so if you’re overweight, you should take steps to lose weight. By losing 5% to 10% of your body weight, you can reduce your risk. You can do this by eating smaller portions and being more physically active, which, conveniently enough, are two other ways to prevent type 2 diabetes. Reduce portions and eat healthier: You should choose healthier food choices by reducing portions and limiting added fat and sugar. Choose more whole grains, vegetables, and lean meats and dairy products. Seek out new, healthy recipes; there are many cookbooks that offer lower-fat and healthier recipes. A terrific rule to follow is: everything in moderation. Reduce portion sizes overall. Limit your intake of alcohol; you don’t have to entirely avoid it. Eat small, well-balanced meals spread throughout the day; larger meals can make it more difficult to keep your blood glucose level in a healthy range. Exercising: Exercise is important to help prevent type 2 diabetes because it has so many benefits. It can help you lose weight, and if you’re insulin resistant, it can help your body increase its sensitivity to insulin (exercise can help you use insulin better). Plus, exercise keeps your heart strong, makes you sleep better, and can even put you in a better mood. Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Want To Reduce Risk? Here's How

Type 2 Diabetes: Want To Reduce Risk? Here's How

Type 2 diabetes: 5 easy ways to reduce your risk Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of the 21 milliondiagnosed diabetes cases in the U.S. (Another 8.1 million are undiagnosed.) But preventive actioncan bepowerful. Even modest weight loss - 5 to 10 percent of body weight - can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Even modest lifestyle changes can greatly decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes, helping ward off a serioushealth threat . Diabetes not only increases the risk of death, it can leadto a host of complications such as blindness, heart disease and stroke. Makingone or two small changes per week will, over time, add up to a considerably healthier lifestyle.Doing somay also prevent type 2 diabetes. As Diabetes Awareness Month draws to a close, we offer these tips to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. 1. Know your risk. Age is one significant risk factor, with people45 and older being at greater risk. Weight is also a risk factor. The National Institutes of Health offers an at-risk weight chart to help people determine if they may be at risk. Having family members with diabetes; being African-American, Latino, American Indian, Asian-American or Pacific Islander; having had gestational diabetes; being inactive; and having higher-than-normal glucose levels, high blood pressure or high triglyceride levels are also among the risk factors. 2. Lose a little weight. Modest weight loss can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. According to the National Institutes of Health'sDiabetes Prevention Program study, even a little weight loss can make a difference in risk. Just a 5 to 7 percent weight loss thats 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person can prevent or delay the onset of the disease. 3. Get at least 30 minu Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Six Useful Steps

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Six Useful Steps

Type 2 diabetes is a serious but common disease that can harm many organs of the body. Currently, 40 percent of people in the United States are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. There are ways to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This article will look at six of them. Overview of diabetes Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, refers to a group of metabolic diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin or use insulin properly. Insulin plays a crucial role in delivering glucose, or sugar, into the cells where it is then used for energy. People with untreated or poorly managed diabetes have abnormally high levels of glucose in their blood. This can lead to organ damage and other complications. Too much glucose in the blood is called hyperglycemia. Symptoms include fatigue, blurry vision, hunger, increased thirst, and frequent urination. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for about 90-95 percent of all diagnosed cases. In type 2 diabetes, the body develops a resistance to insulin. This means the body can't use insulin to absorb blood sugar into the cells to be used for energy. Some people with type 2 diabetes may stop producing enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels within normal ranges. Type 2 diabetes usually affects people who are older. It emerges more slowly than type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may not have noticeable symptoms. A person may have type 2 diabetes without knowing it. Treatment of type 2 diabetes involves diet, exercise, and sometimes medications. Lifestyle changes can also help to prevent type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong disease, thought to be an autoimmune disease that usually develops during childhood and adolescence. In type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

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