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How Can You Reduce The Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes?

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

You may be able to prevent type 2 diabetes. Even if you have several of the risk factors and even if you’ve been told you have pre-diabetes, you can take action and reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Don’t delay: if you’ve been told that you’re at risk of developing diabetes, get started as soon as possible. Your healthcare provider can help you develop a plan, but it should include: Getting to—and staying at—a healthy weight: Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, so if you’re overweight, you should take steps to lose weight. By losing 5% to 10% of your body weight, you can reduce your risk. You can do this by eating smaller portions and being more physically active, which, conveniently enough, are two other ways to prevent type 2 diabetes. Reduce portions and eat healthier: You should choose healthier food choices by reducing portions and limiting added fat and sugar. Choose more whole grains, vegetables, and lean meats and dairy products. Seek out new, healthy recipes; there are many cookbooks that offer lower-fat and healthier recipes. A terrific rule to follow is: everything in moderation. Reduce portion sizes overall. Limit your intake of alcohol; you don’t have to entirely avoid it. Eat small, well-balanced meals spread throughout the day; larger meals can make it more difficult to keep your blood glucose level in a healthy range. Exercising: Exercise is important to help prevent type 2 diabetes because it has so many benefits. It can help you lose weight, and if you’re insulin resistant, it can help your body increase its sensitivity to insulin (exercise can help you use insulin better). Plus, exercise keeps your heart strong, makes you sleep better, and can even put you in a better mood. Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

5 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive: October 2009 Given the serious consequences emanating from insulin resistance and Type-2 diabetes, preventing this disease is certainly our best weapon in reducing the damage caused by a surplus of blood sugar. Luckily for us, the preventive potential is extraordinary: Adopting a healthy lifestyle can prevent up to 90 percent of Type-2 diabetes cases! To see how we can reduce the risk of diabetes, let us review some lifestyle factors. 1. Maintain a healthy body weight Given that excess weight and obesity are instrumental in the development of Type-2 diabetes, maintaining a normal body weight is an essential aspect of any preventive approach. The most spectacular illustration of how weight loss can influence the risk of diabetes is undoubtedly the effect of bariatric surgery (reducing stomach size) on morbidly obese people. Radically reducing the size of the stomach rapidly decreases obesity and almost completely eliminates Type-2 diabetes! However, it is neither necessary nor desirable to undergo this type of surgery to reap the benefits of weight loss: Losing just 5 kg, even over several years, can reduce the risk of diabetes by 50%! At a time when overweight has become the norm rather than the exception, Type-2 diabetes undoubtedly illustrates the dangers of excess weight and the need to be as slim as possible in order to prevent this disease. 2. Reduce intake of high-sugar foods You can also significantly reduce the risk of diabetes by paying particular attention to the amount and especially the type of carbohydrates: that is, the sugar in your diet. There are three main types of carbohydrates. ‘ The first is simple sugars ‘ like those in fruits, dairy products, maple syrup, or honey ‘ and sugars added to various products sold in grocery Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

5 Steps To Lower Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

5 Steps To Lower Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk

The statistics are concerning: Diabetes affects about 26 million U.S. adults—almost 11 million of whom are 65 or older. Without dramatic lifestyle changes, more than one-third of Americans will have diabetes by 2050, predicts the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). By making five healthy lifestyle changes associated with weight, nutrition, activity, smoking and alcohol, you can dramatically lower your diabetes risk, suggests new research. Each factor alone reduces diabetes risk by more than 30 percent. Together, they're associated with lowering risk by 72 percent for men and 80 percent for women. About the study The analysis, by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), marks the first time a combination of five specific lifestyle factors and their effects on type 2 diabetes has been put to the test so comprehensively. In the past, researchers focused mainly on the impact of individual factors. Research on combined factors has been limited. For this latest analysis, investigators gathered data from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, an unrelated study that tracked the lifestyle habits of more than 200,000 healthy men and women in the United States. At the beginning of this study, participants ranging in age from 50 to 71 completed a survey about their lifestyle habits. The new study measured the number of diabetes cases that had developed among participants 11 years later. The new study had some limitations, most notably that the study participants didn't truly represent the U.S. population. When the study began, most participants were healthier and weighed less than the typical American in the same age range. What's more, the study subjects were mostly Caucasian, so the data may not be relevant for African Americans and Hispanics. Another limitation was Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Around three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. However you’ve found out you’re at risk – and knowing is a big first step – the important thing to do now is take action to lower your risk. Evidence shows the best way to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes is by: eating better moving more reducing your weight if you’re overweight Where do I start? The key is to find what works for you, fits in with your day and you enjoy. 1. Set clear goals Setting goals can help you break down what you need to do and how to do it. Use our Action Plan (PDF, 66KB)to set healthy goals and keep aFood and activity diary (PDF, 40KB)to keep you on track. 2. Plan ahead It’s helpful to plan meals for the week ahead especially when we all lead busy lives. This can help you reach your goal to eat better and stick to a budget. 3. Start to make healthy changes Time to put your plan into action. Each healthy choice you make is helping you to achieve your goal. If you find it hard, don’t give up – start again tomorrow. 4. Be creative Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring. Take the opportunity to try new recipes and new food. 5. Sleep well Get a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that if you are tired you feel hungrier and are more likely to want fatty and sugary foods. This can make it harder to stick to your goals. What changes can I make to eat better? Eating better doesn’t have to mean boring or tasteless. We've got plenty of tools, tips and recipes to help you eat healthier. We've got healthier versions of your favourite recipes, or follow our videos and learn to cook a new recipe. How can I move more every day? Getting active and staying active will reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, and you’ll feel great too. If you're not sur Continue reading >>

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Piggybacking the obesity epidemic, diabetes rates continue to surge. On June 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new and alarming statistics on diabetes. An estimated 29 million Americans have the disease, a nearly 12 percent increase from the 26 million diabetics in 2010. One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes. The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. The good news is type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the antidiabetes drug metformin. 7 tips to help reduce your risk: Lose excess body fat. Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent. Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar. Drink water. Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls. Move your body. Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive t Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Cut Your Risk Of Diabetes

5 Ways To Cut Your Risk Of Diabetes

The older we get, the more likely we are to get diabetes, specifically type 2. Around 1 in 7 older people have diabetes and these numbers are likely to rise. Although no-one completely understands the causes of diabetes, if you control the risk factors, you can reduce your chances of getting it. The facts about diabetes It's estimated that 4.5 million people are living with diabetes in the UK. A further 1.1 million people may have diabetes but haven't been diagnosed. 9 out of 10 of these cases are type 2 diabetes, the preventable form of the condition. Although we don’t know the causes, there are a number of factors that can increase your chance of developing type 2 diabetes, so by taking simple steps, you can lower your chances of getting it. Quite simply, shedding pounds will drastically reduce your chances of getting type 2 diabetes. 80% of people who have diabetes are overweight, so if you are overweight or obese, it’s time to think about cutting back. A good measure is your waist size. More than 31.5 inches (80cm) for a woman and 37 inches (94cm) for a man and you need to start thinking about cutting back. It goes without saying that increasing the amount of time you spend exercising will make you feel better and help towards losing weight. Research has found that regular exercise can reduce your risk of developing by up to 64%, so it is backed up by science. Talk to your GP for an idea of some suitable exercises for you. Most people are aware of smoking’s link to cancer, but not as many understand how it’s connected to diabetes. Smoking has been proven to increase blood pressure levels, which are known to be a major cause of diabetes. A diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt and contains a lot of fruit and veg will reduce your cholesterol levels – a sim Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

Take Steps To Prevent Type2diabetes

Take Steps To Prevent Type2diabetes

Diabetes (dy-ah-BEE-teez) is a leading cause of disability and death in the United States. Diabetes increases the risk of serious health problems like: The good news is that you can do a lot to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes, including: Next section Types of Diabetes 1 of 9 sections Diabetes means you have glucose (sugar) levels in your blood that are higher than usual. Your body depends on glucose for energy. When you eat, most of the food turns into glucose. Your blood carries the glucose to other parts of your body. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble turning glucose into energy. Instead of being used by your body, the glucose builds up in your blood and your body is starved of energy. Diabetes is a chronic (long-term) condition. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. People who are overweight are more likely to get type2diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a problem with the immune system (the system that helps fight infection). Right now, theres no way to prevent type 1 diabetes. Gestational (jes-TAY-shon-al) diabetes is a type of diabetes that some women develop during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of health problems for you and your baby. For example, gestational diabetes can make it more likely that youll develop type 2 diabetes after pregnancy. Next section Am I at Risk? Previous section Overview 2 of 9 sections You may be at risk for type 2 diabetes if you: Next section Cost and Insurance Previous section Symptoms 5 of 9 sections Under the Affordable Care Act , the health care reform law passed in 2010, insurance plans must cover: Diabetes screening for adults with high blood pressure Diet counseling for adults at higher risk for chronic disease Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get t Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Tweet When people talk about prevention of diabetes, it is usually about preventing type 2 diabetes. In the majority of cases, type 2 diabetes is brought on by lifestyle factors which can often be prevented. These include an unbalanced diet, lack of activity, lack of sleep, stress, smoking and alcohol. By making lifestyles changes, you can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes prevention overview Leading doctors and researchers point to excessive levels of insulin as the likely reason why insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes develops. Strategies such as low-carb diets and exercise help to reduce levels of insulin and are therefore effective for preventing type 2 diabetes from developing. There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, some of which are preventable, such as weight gain around the middle (central obesity), high cholesterol/triglyceride levels and high blood pressure. Losing weight, adopting more activity into your day, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol intake can also help towards lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and improving your all-round health. Diet and preventing type 2 diabetes Diet is the most important part of lifestyle change. The adage that you can’t outrun a bad diet is true. It is much easier to lose weight on a good diet even if you are struggling to do exercise, than it is through exercise if you’re eating a poor diet. Effective diets to prevent type 2 diabetes are those that do not cause your body to produce a lot of insulin. Carbohydrate has the biggest demand on insulin and so any diet that helps reduce carbohydrate intake will help towards reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Cutting out sugary food and drink and refined grains such as white bread and white rice is a good Continue reading >>

4. Prevention Or Delay Of Type 2 Diabetes

4. Prevention Or Delay Of Type 2 Diabetes

Patients with prediabetes should be referred to an intensive diet and physical activity behavioral counseling program adhering to the tenets of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) targeting a loss of 7% of body weight and should increase their moderate-intensity physical activity (such as brisk walking) to at least 150 min/week. A Follow-up counseling and maintenance programs should be offered for long-term success in preventing diabetes. B Based on the cost-effectiveness of diabetes prevention, such programs should be covered by third-party payers. B Metformin therapy for prevention of type 2 diabetes should be considered in those with prediabetes, especially in those with BMI >35 kg/m2, those aged <60 years, and women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus. A At least annual monitoring for the development of diabetes in those with prediabetes is suggested. E Screening for and treatment of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease is suggested. B Diabetes self-management education and support programs are appropriate venues for people with prediabetes to receive education and support to develop and maintain behaviors that can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. B Technology-assisted tools including Internet-based social networks, distance learning, DVD-based content, and mobile applications can be useful elements of effective lifestyle modification to prevent diabetes. B Lifestyle Modification Randomized controlled trials have shown that individuals at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or both) can significantly decrease the rate of diabetes onset with particular interventions (1–7). These include intensive lifestyle modification programs that have been shown to be very effective (∼58% r Continue reading >>

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Reduce Portion Sizes Portion size is the amount of food you eat, such as 1 cup of fruit or 6 ounces of meat. If you are trying to eat smaller portions, eat a half of a bagel instead of a whole bagel or have a 3-ounce hamburger instead of a 6-ounce hamburger. Three ounces is about the size of your fist or a deck of cards. Put less on your plate, Nate. 1. Drink a large glass of water 10 minutes before your meal so you feel less hungry. 2. Keep meat, chicken, turkey, and fish portions to about 3 ounces. 3. Share one dessert. Eat a small meal, Lucille. 4. Use teaspoons, salad forks, or child-size forks, spoons, and knives to help you take smaller bites and eat less. 5. Make less food look like more by serving your meal on a salad or breakfast plate. 6. Eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to send a signal to your brain that you are full. 7. Listen to music while you eat instead of watching TV (people tend to eat more while watching TV). How much should I eat? Try filling your plate like this: 1/4 protein 1/4 grains 1/2 vegetables and fruit dairy (low-fat or skim milk) Move More Each Day Find ways to be more active each day. Try to be active for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Walking is a great way to get started and you can do it almost anywhere at any time. Bike riding, swimming, and dancing are also good ways to move more. If you are looking for a safe place to be active, contact your local parks department or health department to ask about walking maps, community centers, and nearby parks. Dance it away, Faye. 8. Show your kids the dances you used to do when you were their age. 9. Turn up the music and jam while doing household chores. 10. Work out with a video that shows you how to get active. Let's go, Flo. 11. Deliver a message in person to a co-worke Continue reading >>

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