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How Can You Manage Your Diabetes?

Manage Your Diabetes

Manage Your Diabetes

If you just found out you have diabetes, you probably have a lot of questions and you may feel a little uncertain. But you’re not alone. In the United States, 23.6 million people have diabetes. Most of these people lead full, healthy lives. One of the best things you can do for yourself is to learn all you can about diabetes. You are the most important person involved in the management of your diabetes! Your healthcare team is here to help. We encourage you to learn and ask questions. The resources listed will give you tips to help you manage your diabetes. Continue reading >>

How To Successfully Manage Your Diabetes: 10 Things To Know

How To Successfully Manage Your Diabetes: 10 Things To Know

Approximately 29 million people, 9 percent of the population, are living with diabetes in the U.S. While it may seem challenging at first following your diagnosis, you can take steps to manage the disease and prevent complications. And, if you’ve been diagnosed with prediabetes, you may be able to prevent the development of the disease entirely. It may feel overwhelming when discussing your condition with your doctors because they will likely instruct you to make a few significant lifestyle changes. My best advice is to break those big changes into small manageable steps. Talk with your health care team about which changes are most important for you, and make those changes first. It is now your job to take care of your body and keep yourself healthy. Here are 10 tips to make managing your condition a little easier: 1. Learn about diabetes. Work closely with your health care team to learn how to manage your diabetes. Learn about the risks and quick fixes that will make an impact on your health. Wondering where to turn? Schedule a meeting with a certified diabetes educator. Ask your health insurer for help. At Priority Health, we have care managers on staff that can provide guidance. Visit the American Diabetes Association for valuable information at www.diabetes.org. 2. Eat healthy. Healthy eating is one of the most effective tactics for managing diabetes. Start by avoiding sugary drinks and foods high in fat and salt. Eat mostly fresh foods and be mindful of serving sizes. Learn the best times to eat and how different foods affect your blood sugar. Meeting with a certified diabetes educator and/or a dietician may be useful as they can help you create a personalized diabetes meal plan. 3. Increase your activity. Physical activity helps lower your blood sugar. Being act Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes As You Grow Older

How To Manage Your Diabetes As You Grow Older

Diabetes requires careful treatment. A healthy diet and exercise along with medicine are the mainstays of treatment. It is important to follow your healthcare professional’s instructions as long-standing uncontrolled diabetes can cause serious problems, including damage to your eyes, nerves, and kidneys. As you get older, your treatment may need to be changed, making it important to visit your healthcare professional regularly. Eat Healthier Foods All people with diabetes should eat a healthy diet that is low in sugar (including sugar from fruit). Mono and polyunsaturated fats are recommended in moderation. Avoid or reduce unhealthy fats (eg, saturated, trans fat). It may help to see a diabetes educator or nutritionist to help you create a healthy meal plan. Mono and polyunsaturated fats are recommended in moderation. Fish high in omega-3 fatty acids include salmon, fresh tuna, trout, and sardines. Plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids include ground flaxseed, canola oil, soybean oil, nuts (eg, walnuts) and seeds (eg, sunflower). Get Regular Exercise Exercise is an important part of diabetes management and can help you lose weight (if you need to), lower your blood glucose level, and improve your cholesterol level. The American Diabetes Association recommends 30 minutes of aerobic activity at least 5 days a week, and strength training at least 2 times per week. You can split up the exercise into 10-minute workouts 3 times a day. Examples of aerobic and strength-training exercises are shown in the Table. Always talk to your healthcare professional before starting a new exercise program to see if it is right for you. If you have trouble walking, chair exercise programs are available on DVD, online, or at local community centers or gyms. “Chair classes” are even avail Continue reading >>

Tools To Help You Manage Your Diabetes

Tools To Help You Manage Your Diabetes

Food, physical activity, stress management, medication, and monitoring blood glucose are tools that can help manage your diabetes. Food Your body needs food to make glucose that is used for energy. Eating the right foods during the day will help to keep your blood glucose in control. Remember that food makes blood glucose go up, so controlling how much, what kind and when you eat can make a difference. Here are some tips: Eat three well-balanced meals a day. If meals are more than 4 to 5 hours apart, eat a small snack. Eat a bedtime snack so that your body has enough energy while you sleep. Do not skip meals or snacks. Your body will make up for the lack of glucose by "asking" the liver to produce extra glucose. This can make controlling your blood glucose even harder. Ask for help if you have questions or need advice about your food choices. Physical activity Physical activity is important for everyone. When you have diabetes, it helps to use up blood glucose. Physical activity also makes your insulin work better. Check with your doctor before starting an exercise program. Start slowly to avoid injury. Choose activities that you will enjoy. Get physical activity every day. Stress management Stress increases blood glucose and can cause problems with your blood glucose control. Think about what causes stress for you. Find healthy ways that help you cope with stress. Try them. Seek help if you need it. Medication There are many medications that help control blood glucose. Your doctor will choose the best medications for you if you need them. It is not unusual for your medication needs to change. Monitoring blood glucose Regular testing will tell you how your food, physical activity and medication are working. You can use the diabetes management plan in this content for fo Continue reading >>

Help Managing Your Diabetes

Help Managing Your Diabetes

Help Managing Your Diabetes Online education sessions are led by Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) Get your questions answered during a LIVE question-and-answer portion with a CDE PLUS, get a FREE diabetes management tool after the session! Managing Diabetes With Your Healthcare Team Sanofi US respects your interest in keeping your personal information private. We will not sell or rent your information to any outside mailing lists. For more information, click here to view our Privacy Policy. By clicking the "Sign Up Now" button, I agree that the information provided below may be used by Sanofi US, its affiliates and the business service companies working with Sanofi US to provide me with this additional information and to develop products and services concerning diabetes which may include market research. Continue reading >>

Tips To Help Manage Diabetes At Work

Tips To Help Manage Diabetes At Work

Millions of people with diabetes refuse to let it get in the way of their careers, and there's no reason they should. Diabetes may present some working day challenges. Knowing how to manage these is the key. The more you know about your diabetes, and the more you know about controlling your blood glucose levels, the better off you'll be. The more you know, the better prepared you will be to deal with any work situations that arise, including explaining your condition to others if you decide to. People with diabetes have legal protection in the workplace under disability discrimination laws, even though people with diabetes may not describe their condition as a disability. Some jobs have special health rules meaning diabetes would need to be disclosed. However, most jobs have no legal requirement for this. Deciding whether to tell employers or colleagues is a matter of personal choice. Here are some tips and advice on diabetes in the workplace. Start your working day the right way Everyone is short of time in the morning but you should never miss breakfast, particularly on a working day. When you have diabetes, depending on your medication, skipping breakfast can lead to dangerously low glucose levels. Not only can missing breakfast affect your health but it can also affect safety and performance at work. A healthy breakfast will help set the tone for a productive working day. It’s also important to have a healthy lunch in mind. This will help your energy levels and concentration stay high throughout the day. You may choose to take a packed lunch and snacks to work. This way you know exactly what you’re going to be eating and you can eat it whenever you are ready to. If you choose to buy your lunch, whether the food comes from a sandwich bar, work canteen or cafe, th Continue reading >>

Managing The Cost Of Your Diabetes

Managing The Cost Of Your Diabetes

Diabetes is an expensive disease. Approximately 9.3% of Americans have diabetes and another 27% have pre-diabetes. In 2012, the estimated direct medical costs such as doctor’s visits, hospitalizations, and medications were $176 BILLION. Based on these numbers, diabetes alone accounts for 7% of the money we spend in our health care system. In addition, we lose $69 billion per year in reduced productivity – time off from work for doctor’s visits and hospitalizations, early disability, and early death all cost our society. The epidemic of obesity will only make these costs more staggering in the future. What can we do to improve these dreadful statistics? Importantly, if you have diabetes, what can you do to cut the cost of your illness? There are two main classifications of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes typically occurs in childhood or young adulthood, and is an autoimmune phenomenon that destroys the ability of the pancreas to make insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin and eventually the pancreas burns out. Type 2 diabetes is usually adult onset and is the result of obesity and genetic predisposition. The obesity epidemic has significantly increased the number of children with Type 2 diabetes. The distinction between types of diabetes is important both in treatment and in financial implications. Personal Cost of Diabetes Many people think of diabetes as just a problem with “high sugar” levels. Have you ever spilled something sweet on your hands? It leaves them sticky and gross, especially if you can’t wash them and gunk gets on top of the sugar. Imagine your blood having high levels of a substance doing the exact same thing to your body. As it courses through your blood vessels, it coats all your organs, and her Continue reading >>

Live Well With Diabetes

Live Well With Diabetes

The best medicine for your diabetes may be learning all you can about how to live healthy with the disease. Your knowledge of nutrition, exercise, monitoring and medication can help you manage your condition and enjoy life to its fullest. Understanding your condition Our Diabetes Education program includes classes, seminars, support groups and other services to help you get the information you need, get a plan that works for you, and get strong to live a healthy life. We understand how difficult it can be to control your blood glucose. Many factors influence your levels, such as food choice and quantity, timing when you take your diabetes medications, stress, illnesses, your weight and your body's resistance to insulin. To help maintain healthy blood glucose, our educators teach you how to live with diabetes, whether you’re at home, school, work or out in the community. Understand the basics of diabetes pathophysiology Achieve control through exercise, food planning and medications Monitor the effectiveness of your management plan Prevent and recognize emergency situations Manage diabetes during minor illness and know when to call your doctor Decrease the risk of developing complications, such as kidney disease, eye disease, nerve damage or cardiovascular disease Plan meals and food intake Care for your feet Learn how to live a healthy lifestyle with your diabetes. Talk with our diabetes educators, (574) 364-2746. Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Manage Your Diabetes

10 Tips To Manage Your Diabetes

The problem with living with a chronic condition like diabetes is that it’s, well, chronic. It doesn’t go away. Bridget McNulty, type 1 diabetic and editor of Sweet Life diabetes lifestyle magazine and online community, offers 10 tips to make living with diabetes a little easier: 1. Take your medication This one is so obvious that I shouldn’t have to mention it, but it probably has the biggest impact on any diabetic’s life. Insulin – whether in pill form for type 2 diabetics or injections or a pump for type 1 diabetics – is literally life-saving. Take your medication properly, and you can live a long, happy, healthy life with diabetes. Don’t take your medication and you can get very ill, very fast. 2. Eat a healthy diet Again, it’s not rocket science, but it is vitally important. People with diabetes don’t have to eat a special ‘diabetes diet’, but they do have to eat the same healthy diet that we should all be eating: little to no fast food, junk food, fizzy drinks, sweets and cakes, lots of fresh vegetables, some fruit, good quality proteins, the right kind of fats and a small amount of wholegrain carbs. We all know that refined carbohydrates like white rice and pasta and doughnuts and cookies are bad for us – as diabetics, it’s important to know this and respect it. That’s not to say there’s no room for treats in life, but I always stick to my mom’s advice: “everything in moderation" 3. Exercise regularly Moderate exercise three times a week is the magic key to a healthy life with diabetes, in my opinion. We can all find half an hour three times a week to go for a walk, or do a yoga class, or jog around the block. And in the long-term, that’s going to be much better for your health than one big gym session once a week. Slow and ste Continue reading >>

> Diabetes Control: Why It's Important

> Diabetes Control: Why It's Important

People who have diabetes may hear or read a lot about controlling, or managing, the condition. But what is diabetes control and why is it so important? When you hear your doctors or health care providers talk about "diabetes control," they're usually referring to how close your blood sugar, or glucose, is kept to the desired range. Having too much or too little sugar in your blood can lead you to feel sick now and can cause health problems later. Managing diabetes is like a three-way balancing act: The medications you take (insulin or pills), the food you eat, and the amount of exercise you get all need to be in sync. Diabetes can get out of control if someone: doesn't take diabetes medicines as directed doesn't follow the meal plan (like eating too much or not enough food without adjusting diabetes medicines) doesn't get regular exercise or exercises more or less than usual without making changes to his or her diabetes plan has an illness or too much stress doesn't check blood sugar levels enough Out-of-control blood sugar levels can lead to short-term problems like hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, or diabetic ketoacidosis. In the long run, not controlling diabetes can also damage the vessels that supply blood to important organs, like the heart, kidneys, eyes, and nerves. This means that heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems can happen to people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens who have had the disease for only a few years, but they can happen to adults with diabetes. Kids and teens with diabetes who don't control their blood sugar levels can be late going into puberty and might not end up as tall as they would have otherwise. The good news is that keeping blood sugar levels under control can help Continue reading >>

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

Life with type 2 diabetes can sometimes seem like an hourly or even minute-by-minute effort to stabilize your blood sugar. All of the recommendations and drugs you’ve been given as part of your type 2 diabetes treatment plan are intended to help you reach — and keep — healthy blood sugar levels most of the time. But doctors are learning that to control type 2 diabetes well, better information about why blood sugar matters and how to manage it is essential. The Facts About Diabetes and Blood Sugar As the American Diabetes Association (ADA) explains, your body needs sugar (glucose) for fuel, and there’s a fairly complicated process that makes it possible for your body to use that sugar. Insulin, which is made by the pancreas, is the hormone that enables the cells in your body to take advantage of sugar. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body isn’t able to remove sugar from your blood. This can happen if your body stops being sensitive to insulin or if it starts to respond in a delayed or exaggerated way to changes in your blood sugar. Diabetes is signaled by an elevated blood sugar level of more than 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) for a fasting blood test, or more than 200 mg/dL at any time during the day. It can also be indicated by a hemoglobin A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher, a measure of the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin in the blood during the past two to three months. (Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body. So an A1C of 6.5 means that 6.5 percent of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them.) Unchecked high blood sugar gradually damages the blood vessels in your body. Over the long term, this slow, progressive harm can lead to a dangerous loss of sensation in your legs and fe Continue reading >>

Managing Your Diabetes

Managing Your Diabetes

Before you developed diabetes your pancreas kept your blood glucose levels within the normal range by producing the right amount of insulin at the right time. There is no cure for diabetes, but it can be managed. Balancing the carbohydrate foods (sugars and starches) you eat with physical activity and medicine (if prescribed) can keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. There are also some other variables, eg illness, that will have an effect on your glucose level and your diabetes nurse specialist will outline these further for you. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care In Prison: How To Manage Your Diabetes In Prison

Diabetes Care In Prison: How To Manage Your Diabetes In Prison

The United States has experienced mass incarceration, and now 2 million people are held in federal prisons and correctional institutions across the country. 80,000 of those, or 4.8%, are diabetics1. Statistics from 1998 show that 11 million people were set free from correctional institutions. Many more pass through the system, such as diabetics experiencing hypoglycemic episodes on the roadways who are often mistaken for being intoxicated or on illegal drugs2. ADA Standards for Care in Prison The American Diabetes Association has written policies to guide correctional institutions in meeting national standards for diabetes care. They include provisions where a diabetic who is incarcerated would be allowed to perform their own self-care, including finger stick blood sugars and insulin or other diabetes injections, as well as keep extra carbohydrates in their jail cell for the possibility of a low blood sugar. The ADA stand generally sets forth standards where all prisons should continue Medical Nutrition Therapy, a regular activity regimen, and special dietary considerations for those with diabetes. It is true that a prison is a controlled environment. If everything were to be in place in prison for the diabetic as ADA envisions, then diabetes management in the prison would likely be better than diabetes management for the person prior to incarceration. This has been shown to be true in some prisons who do have strict guidelines for providing care to their diabetic prisoners and are following them. Some diabetics A1C prior to incarceration has been shown to drop several points once incarcerated due to stricter monitoring in the institution. The ADA recognizes a need for screening upon entrance to a correctional facility. A person with diabetes who is being incarcerated, Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

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Diabetes: Your Management Plan

Diabetes: Your Management Plan

When you have diabetes, it’s very important to keep your blood glucose (sugar) in good control. To do so, you need a personal plan to help you manage your diabetes. This patient education sheet tells you how to control your blood glucose level and manage your diabetes. What is good control? Good control of diabetes means that your blood glucose stays within certain ranges. These ranges are based on guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Here are the numbers that show where your blood glucose should be: Before meals Recommended goal is 70 to 130. You need to improve if your level is often over 150. If your blood glucose is below 70, you need to follow the guidelines for treating low blood glucose. See UPMC education sheet Diabetes: Short-Term Problems. After meals Recommended goal is no higher than 180. If it has been two hours or longer after the start of a meal, this number should be even lower. At bedtime Recommended goal is 110 to 150. You need to improve if your level is often under 110 or over 180. Certain diabetes medications may drop blood glucose too low through the night if you are running in the lower ranges before bedtime. Speak to your doctor or diabetes educator if your are at risk for having low blood glucose. A1c test (A-one-C) This test measures the amount of hemoglobin with sugar attached. The results show your estimated average blood glucose level over 3 months. The light areas on the chart show the recommended target range for A1C. Note that A1c is measured in percent. The chart shows how this compares to your blood glucose readings. Normal A1c is under 5.7 percent. When you have diabetes, recommended goal is 7 percent or less. Goals may vary from person to person. Talk to your doctor or diabetes educator about what goals are best Continue reading >>

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