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How Can Type 2 Diabetes Kill You?

Miriam Stoppard: A Simple 600 Calorie-a-day Diet Can Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Miriam Stoppard: A Simple 600 Calorie-a-day Diet Can Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes affects nearly four million people in the UK and I know of a simple way to cure it. Yes, cure. All it involves is eight weeks of eating 600 calories a day. But you don’t have to wait that long to see results, you’ll get them in just a week. Now I’m not saying eating 600 calories a day for eight weeks is easy. But surely it is worth the hunger pangs. Just because type 2 diabetes is common doesn’t mean it’s harmless. It's not – it can kill you through heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. Then there’s blindness and amputations. So here’s how the 600 calorie plan works. Excess calories in our diet lead to a fatty liver, say scientists at Newcastle University. This causes the liver to produce too much glucose and raises blood sugar levels, the first sign of a diabetes problem. Then the excess fat from the liver passes to the pancreas, causing the insulin-producing cells to fail, thus causing diabetes. However, researchers say losing less than one gram of fat from the pancreas can jump-start insulin production, which reverses type 2 diabetes. And this reversal remains for 10 years, lead author Professor Roy Taylor said. The diet typically causes people to lose 15kg of weight, which itself helps reverse the condition. Prof Taylor, who has spent almost four decades studying type 2 diabetes , said: “I think the real importance of this work is for the patients themselves. “Many have described to me how embarking on the low calorie diet has been the only option to prevent what they thought – or had been told – was an inevitable decline into further medication and further ill health because of their diabetes. “By studying the underlying mechanisms we have been able to demonstrate the simplicity of type 2 diabetes.” The Newcastle stud Continue reading >>

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Reversed?

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Reversed?

Nearly 20 million Americans have diabetes, and another 86 million are at risk for developing it. But what if it could be reversed? Jane Ann says that a new program has done just that for her. Jane Ann was diagnosed with diabetes 15 years ago, when she weighed almost 300 pounds. “My legs would swell to the point that they would almost seep, like a blister,” she says. “My hands would go to sleep and tingle. I was getting neuropathy in my feet.” Jane Ann was put on a drug regimen that had her taking six to eight pills a day, plus injections before every meal – and her blood sugar was still out of control. “I thought that this was my life,” she says. “Medication, struggling to be healthy, being tired.” She faced the very real possibility that diabetes would kill her. Then Jane Ann heard of a new clinical study called Virta, “and that was the start of my journey,” she says. She was told upfront that the goal of Virta was not weight loss, but diabetes control. “The goal is to help reduce your medication – maybe even get off of medication – and put your concentration onto nutrition.” Watch: Dr. Phil's "ON IT" Movement! Working with a life coach and a nutritionist, Jane Ann embarked on a low carb, high fat, moderate protein eating plan. “I was all in,” she says. “I am doing absolutely fabulous!” Jane Ann tells The Doctors. Her glucose numbers have dropped from 338 to 83. She’s also lost 80 pounds. Sami Inkinen, the founder and CEO of Virta Health, explains that he had a very personal reason for focusing on type 2 diabetes treatment. “For decades, I thought that as long as you eat well and exercise quite a bit, you will avoid type 2 diabetes,” he says. As an extremely fit triathlete, he thought he was not at risk. “And then to my hug Continue reading >>

5 Nightmares You Don't Know Until You're Diabetic

5 Nightmares You Don't Know Until You're Diabetic

Hey, remember when everybody was freaking out about Ebola, because of an outbreak that killed more than 10,000 people? Well, diabetes kills 1.5 million people a year worldwide, more than 200,000 of them in the U.S. And you're probably never more than a few dozen feet away from someone who has it -- there are 30 million diabetics in the U.S. alone. In other words, for something most people consider too boring to even think about, the scale of the epidemic is mind-boggling. The U.S. alone spends an astonishing quarter of a trillion dollars a year fighting it. Or to put it another way, diabetes sucks a thousand bucks out of every single man, woman and child in America, every year. We previously debunked the myth that sugar causes diabetes, and when we talked to someone with one variety of the disease, we learned about the parts of the experience you never hear about. He says ... 5 The Disease And The Treatment Can Both Send You To The Emergency Room Comstock/Stockbyte/Getty Images Our diabetic, Zach, once woke up in the middle of the night starving, his legs feeling near-paralyzed. His memory of the incident is hazy, but the next thing he knew, he was on a kitchen chair wearing only his boxers with an empty jar of raspberry jam on the table -- he'd eaten nearly the entire thing with his bare hands like fucking Winnie the Pooh. Oh, bother. When he tested his blood sugar, it was 45 (the normal level is between 80 and 100). Anything below 70 is hypoglycemia, yet even after eating an entire jar of what is essentially pure sugar, his blood sugar level was still near emergency levels. If we're being completely honest, it's remarkable that he ever even woke up to eat that jam. By all rights he should've died in his bed. So this shit can get serious, is what we're saying. "Wait," Continue reading >>

Study: Diabetes Medicine Will Kill You Quick

Study: Diabetes Medicine Will Kill You Quick

Editor's Note: John McDougall MD has been citing research like this for years. If you have diabetes and want to get healthy and live longer, forget the pills. They will kill you faster than the disease. Avoid the medical-industrial complex. Your only hope is a dietary intervention, specifically a very low-fat plant-based diet, like the ones PCRM, Dr. Fuhrman, Dr. McDougall and others have repeatedly demonstrated in published studies can reverse Type 2 diabetes. Drugs won't do it, and as the latest study below shows, diabetes drugs will actually kill you FASTER than if you don't take them at all. New results from a large government-run trial confirm that very aggressive treatment to lower blood sugar is associated with an increased risk of death in people with type 2 at high risk for heart attack and stroke. The five-year follow-up from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study confirms findings that ended the trial’s aggressive blood sugar control arm due to safety concerns. The study was designed to determine if intensive blood sugar, blood pressure, or cholesterol lowering with intensive treatment would improve outcomes and reduce deaths among people with type 2 diabetes with heart disease or multiple cardiovascular risk factors. In February 2008, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) announced that the intensive blood sugar lowering arm of the study would be halted 18 months early after investigators reported an increase in deaths among patients in the aggressive treatment group. Various diabetes drugs were used to lower blood sugar in the trial. The higher death rate in the tight control arm was not blamed on any single treatment. FDA Drug Restrictions Last fall, the FDA announced tight restrictions on GlaxoSmithKline’s Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes In General

Which Is Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes In General

Which is worse type 1 or type 2 diabetes? If you are asking this kind of question, then you might never find the person who can give you the answer. Both of those type has their own uniqueness that all of you will surely never want to experience. As an addition, both of those types also have something that will make you relieve when you acquired one of those types instead of the other type. Which is Worse Type 1 or Type 2; Type 1 Perspective For you who have not know what diabetes type 1 is, in short, this is the kind of diabetes that is commonly attack the people whose age is below twenty. The risk of diabetes type 1 can be considered as the worst for some people, especially for those who dream of many things for their future life. You should have known that diabetes can also trigger the heart disease that is able to kill you in an instant. For your information, the diabetes type 1 is the condition when your pancreas is not able to produce the insulin that will help the sugar to come into your blood. That is why when you get the diabetes type 1, you might have to inject the insulin for a few times a day to make you feel better. This might become your consideration when you are asking which is worse type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Which is Worse Type 1 or Type 2; Type 2 Perspective If you have understood the diabetes type 1, then you also need to know diabetes type 2. In diabetes type 2, your pancreas will still be able to produce the insulin, but your blood will not be able to use it efficiently so that the insulin can be considered as something useless if it cannot be used by the body. When you are asking which is worse type 1 or type 2 diabetes, when you will have to take this factor into account. Besides that, most of the diabetics who have the diabetes type 2 need more Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

What Are Some Myths About Type 2 Diabetes?

What Are Some Myths About Type 2 Diabetes?

There are a number of myths about type 2 diabetes. The most dangerous myth is the belief that diabetes isn’t that serious. In fact, type 2 diabetes kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Another popular misconception is that type 2 diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar. This myth probably stems from the fact that if you eat a lot of sugar, you may be overweight, and that can increase your risk for type 2 diabetes. But just because you consume a lot of sugar doesn’t mean you’ll end up with diabetes, which is caused by heredity and lifestyle factors, such as being overweight and not exercising. Another myth: Some people believe that if you have type 2 diabetes, you must eat only special foods. Not true. Your diet should be one that would be healthy for anyone -- low in fat, with vegetables, fruits, whole grains, lean meat and nonfat dairy products. The top 4 myths about type 2 diabetes are: Myth 1: "Diabetes is nothing to worry about -- it's just a 'touch of sugar.' I'm just borderline." Fact: Diabetes is a serious condition, but there's a lot you can do to take care of yourself. Myth 2: "If I take my diabetes pills, I don't have to worry about what I eat or whether I exercise." Fact: All three ways -- medication, meal planning, and physical activity -- work together to treat diabetes. Myth 3: "Once you have diabetes, there's nothing you can do to prevent health problems." Fact: Research has proven that keeping blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels on target can help prevent diabetes complications such as heart attack, stroke, and eye problems. Myth 4: "Now that I have diabetes, I shouldn't eat sugar or carbohydrates." Fact: These days, people with diabetes can eat sweets, carbohydrates, or any other food and still ke Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Is So Dangerous

Why Diabetes Is So Dangerous

There’s a common saying in the diabetes community that diabetes won’t kill you, but it’s complications will. Still, according to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, with over 69,000 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death. [1] Add to that the common complications, like cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and infection, and you can multiply that number by 10! Yet despite these eye-opening statistics, I still see far too many people not taking diabetes seriously. They approach it as something that’s a nuisance rather than something that can and does cause major health complications, and yes even death, if uncontrolled. “Sometimes I pretend I’m not diabetic, but that’s a dangerous game.” – Unknown Diabetes is more dangerous than most people assume, and so it becomes easy for many people with diabetes to get lax in their efforts to manage the dysfunction. A 2012 GAPP2 (Global Attitude of Patients and Physicians 2) survey found that 22% of insulin-using diabetic patients missed a basal insulin dose during a 30-day period. [2] There are very real dangers diabetes poses if left unchecked or mismanaged, and one of my goals today is to motivate you into taking better care of yourself or helping a loved one manage the disease better. Why is diabetes so dangerous? Because if not managed correctly, it can wreak havoc on just about every system and organ in the body. Let’s take a look at some of the biggest risks diabetic complications pose: Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a very dangerous condition that can occur when patients neglect to take their insulin and have uncontrolled blood sugar. Since insulin is necessary to break down glucose as a sourc Continue reading >>

Top 10 Ways Diabetes Can Kill You

Top 10 Ways Diabetes Can Kill You

Diabetes, though a very common disease, is often neglected as not many are aware of how dire its consequences can be. As per a report published in 2014, about 9.3% Americans had this disease in 2012, which is a big growth compared to the numbers recorded in 2010 (8.3%). This disease slowly devours the human body and can even cause sudden death. As per the data found in National Diabetes Statistic Report, it is the 7th leading cause of deaths in the US. The disease itself may not be a direct cause of deaths (69,071 deaths in 2010 with diabetes being the direct cause); however, it does heavily contribute to deaths (234,051 deaths listed it as an connected cause). To help you lead a healthy life and combat this disease better, given below are top 10 ways in which diabetes can kill you. It is important that you’re well aware so that you can live a healthy life. 10. Due To Viral Infections If you have diabetes, catching viral infections can create havoc. Something as little as cold can be troublesome because viruses can cause the depletion of the immune system in the body. When you catch viral infections, your body uses hormones to battle the virus, making it difficult for your body to produce insulin. Such a situation may result in the buildup of acid in your blood (especially in type-I diabetes) which is a life threatening problem. 9. Kidney Failure Diabetes is one of the leading causes of kidney failure (44% as per new data). Even controlled diabetes can cause kidney failure and must be taken seriously. Patients with kidney failure require dialysis or a transplant, which if not possible may result in death. 8. Damage to Blood Vessels Diabetic patients might face consistent damage to the blood vessels, which triggers the possibilities of strokes, heart at tacks and also Continue reading >>

The Lie That’s Killing Us: Pre-diabetes

The Lie That’s Killing Us: Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a lie. Pre-diabetes is Stage 1 diabetes. And I’m taking a stand now advocating that we call it what it is. Pre-diabetes doesn’t exist. And the lie we tell that it does does incredible harm. It stops the nearly 80 million Americans we say have it from making the lifestyle changes necessary to prevent advanced Type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is in truth the first stage of diabetes. My proposition is that recognizing pre-diabetes as “Stage 1” Type 2 diabetes will get millions more people to take action to stop their diabetes from progressing. About 80 million people is roughly the populations of California, Texas and New York combined. The International Diabetes Federation reports that in 2011, 280 million people worldwide were glucose intolerant (pre-diabetic). In only 17 years, 398 million people will be. We clearly need a new strategy. The 25-year campaign the American Diabetes Association has waged to raise awareness of diabetes and pre-diabetes and urge preventive and healthful behaviors has been sadly, and enormously, unsuccessful. Pre-Diabetes Is Stage 1 Diabetes Pre-diabetes literally says you don’t have diabetes — but you do. Your blood sugars are higher than normal, a defining characteristic of diabetes. A study performed at Crittenton Hospital Medical Center in Detroit showed 36 percent of people with pre-diabetes already had coronary artery disease, similar to the 42 percent with Type 2 diabetes and strikingly higher than the 21 percent with normal blood sugars. Higher than normal glucose levels impact hypertension (high blood pressure) and lipids like cholesterol and triglycerides. Plus, most people with pre-diabetes show signs of retinopathy (eye damage), nephropathy (kidney damage) and neuropathy (nerve damage), all diabetes complic Continue reading >>

8 Things I Wish People Understood About Having Type 1 Diabetes

8 Things I Wish People Understood About Having Type 1 Diabetes

I was 25 and in the middle of my second year of law school when I started feeling tired, thirsty, and hungry. I had blurry vision all the time. I was lucky — I mentioned this to a friend, and she said whenever she complained about her eyes her dad tested her blood sugar, because that's how he got diagnosed with diabetes. I had a family history of both types, but I figured I was too old for Type 1 and too young and too much of a gym rat for Type 2. Still, I went to student health. I explained my typical diabetes symptoms and family history to a person we will call "Helpful Nurse." Helpful Nurse decided the best immediate course of action would be to gaslight me aggressively in the five minutes it took to get the results back on my sugar test. "We don't usually get people in here 'thinking' they have 'diabetes.'" Cool story. "See, your vision isn't that bad." It's usually 20/19. "I'm sure you're just stressed about finals." Yeah, especially since I've spent most of the semester unconscious. That's when we heard someone scream from the lab down the hall and around a corner, "Don't let her leave." The equipment in student health had a limited range. My test didn't generate a number. It just said "high." "High" means it was at least six times normal. No, my life isn't over. It's a pain in the ass, it's terrifying, but the treatments will on average get me through the day. I was waiting for a friend to take me to the ER when Helpful Nurse started talking about high- risk pregnancy and "not dying the way my grandmother died." Pregnancy? I have exams in a month. And I watched my T1 grandmother die. Thanks, Helpful Nurse, you can go now. Of course this was a Friday. I spent the weekend eating nothing but tofu and zucchini with my sugar camped at three or four times normal, and Continue reading >>

First Aid For People With Diabetes

First Aid For People With Diabetes

The prevalence of diabetes increased 382% from 1988 to 2014. According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, this growth correlates with the upsurge of visits to the emergency room from people in a life-threatening diabetic crisis. As the condition continues to rise so does the likelihood of providing first aid for someone with diabetes. Understanding Diabetes First-aid providers have important choices to make before providing care to a diabetic. The best way to effectively manage a diabetic emergency is through understanding the mechanisms behind the medical condition. Every cell in the body requires glucose as a foundation of energy. People with diabetes, though needing glucose, have an inability to process, or metabolize, it efficiently because the pancreas is either producing too little insulin or none at all—either way, glucose can accumulate to dangerously high levels. A healthy pancreas regulates the production of insulin proportionate to the amount of glucose in the blood. Classification of Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is primarily an autoimmune condition manifesting in children and young adults. These people do not produce insulin; they require routine injections of insulin to aid in glucose metabolism. Without insulin injections type 1 diabetics cannot use the sugar in their blood for energy. People with Type 2 diabetes produce small amounts of insulin, or they cannot properly use the insulin hormone, also known as insulin resistance. This condition usually develops later in life. Many people with type 2 diabetes use diet, exercise, and other non-insulin medications. Some Type 2 diabetics however, may require supplemental insulin. What is a Diabetic Emergency? With six million people using insulin in the United States, the incidence of too much or too litt Continue reading >>

What Is Blood Sugar/high Blood Sugar

What Is Blood Sugar/high Blood Sugar

Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, which is abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream, so everyone with type 1 and type 2 diabetes has experienced hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia occurs when the body is not properly processing or using glucose, which is the case when insulin levels are low or nonexistent, and normally the excess amounts of glucose in the body is converted to glucogon or fat and stored for later use. Catabolic hormones such as glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamines, thyroxine and somatostatin, will increase blood sugar levels, but only insulin, which is an anabolic hormone, will decrease blood glucose levels. Since insulin is responsible for maintaining safe and healthy blood sugar levels in your body, if it is no longer present or not being produced in sufficient quantities, excess glucose will remain in your bloodstream. The excess glucose in your blood, if allowed to continually increase without treatment, will not only eventually cause serious complications, it can even kill you! Normal range blood sugar levels The standard unit for measuring blood glucose levels around the world is millimoles per liter (mmol/L), but in the U.S. blood glucose levels are measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Blood sugar levels are usually at their lowest in the morning and are commonly known as "fasting blood sugar levels" and should be tested first thing upon waking, before breakfast. In people without diabetes the normal range of blood glucose levels eight to twelve hours after their last meal is between 70 to 100 mg/dL (3.8 to 5.5 mmol/L). Glucose levels rise by a few grams after meals for about an hour or two, so it is usually tested two hours after the end of the meal. In those without diabetes, the normal blood sugar levels aft Continue reading >>

Diabetes (type 2) Share This:

Diabetes (type 2) Share This:

Diabetes is disabling, deadly and on the rise. In fact, diabetes is at epidemic proportions in the United States. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes occurs when your body can't make insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body makes some, but not enough, insulin. It is generally accompanied by an inability to respond normally to insulin. Ninety to 95 percent of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes. A complex relationship between insulin, glucose, your liver and other hormones ensures that your blood sugar stays within set limits. Here's how it works: When you eat, your body breaks down carbohydrates from foods into various sugar molecules. One of these is glucose which is absorbed directly into your bloodstream, to be used or stored. When you don't eat, your liver (and kidney) produce sugar for fuel. Insulin causes glucose to be absorbed into your cells, where it can be used for energy. The pancreas produces insulin and regulates how much is released into your body. If you don't eat for a long period, the pancreas limits release of insulin. After a meal or a snack, the pancreas sends extra insulin into your bloodstream. If you have more glucose than your cells need, your body stores the excess in your liver as glycogen until it's needed. If all goes well, your body maintains "normal" blood sugar levels. If there isn't enough insulin or your body can't use it properly, glucose accumulates in the blood instead of going into cells. When blood glucose levels are chronically too high, you have diabetes. Over the long term, diabetes can cause serious complications, including amputations, blindness, heart disease, stroke, nerve disease, kidney disease and even premature death. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United Stat Continue reading >>

Sepsis And Diabetes

Sepsis And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) autoimmune disease that has a significant impact on your life. Having diabetes means you must work to control your blood glucose (sugar) levels to be sure that they don’t get too high or too low. The amount of glucose in your blood is important. Your body needs glucose for energy, but too much of it can destroy body tissues and too little can starve your body of nutrients. People who have diabetes are also at risk of developing wounds and sores that don’t heal well. While the wounds are present, they are at high risk of developing infection. And, again because of the diabetes, the infections can get severe quickly. When infection overwhelms the body, the body can respond by developing sepsis and going into septic shock. Sometimes incorrectly called blood poisoning, sepsis is the body’s often deadly response to infection. Sepsis kills and disables millions and requires early suspicion and rapid treatment for survival. Sepsis and septic shock can result from an infection anywhere in the body, such as pneumonia, influenza, or urinary tract infections. Worldwide, one-third of people who develop sepsis die. Many who do survive are left with life-changing effects, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic pain and fatigue, organ dysfunction (organs don’t work properly) and/or amputations. What is diabetes? Your pancreas is a small organ (about 6” by 1.5”) that is part of your digestive system. It is connected to your small intestine and it lies just below your stomach towards the back. Your pancreas has a few roles, one is to help digest the food you eat and another is to secrete (send out) insulin, which stimulates your cells to use the glucose in the food and drink you consume. When a person has diabetes, the pancre Continue reading >>

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