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How Can Stem Cells Be Used To Treat Diabetes And Paralysis

Video: How Stem Cells Could Help Treat Breast Cancer

Video: How Stem Cells Could Help Treat Breast Cancer

From quadriplegic paralysis to the pitcher's mound Only a year ago, Lucas was a paraplegic. Now he's throwing the first pitch at a baseball game. read more Californias First Embryonic Stem Cell Recipient In my heart, I believe that being in a wheelchair is temporary. In my lifetime, Im going to walk. So, it helps know theres something over the horiz read more Benefit # 15 (of 71) from the California Stem Cell Program: AVOIDING AMPUTATIONS? When my son Roman Reed was first paralyzed, and lying in the hospital bed, he developed a pressure sore on his right heel: harmless-looking, at ... read more Top 5 Stem Cell Research Milestones in the Last 12 Months October 11, 2017 is Stem Cell Awareness Day.On this day, we celebrate the progress of stem cell research. We reflect on the past year to ... read more A Quadriplegic Takes The Mound In Milwaukee Last week, Lucas Lindneronly a year removed from a car crash that left him a quadriplegicrolled up to the pitcher's mound at Miller Park in ... read more Antonio Quistian grew up in San Diego, California, surrounded by motorcycle enthusiasts. He was a healthy young man, who admittedly had never given ... read more VIDEO: How Stem Cell Research Could Cure Sickle Cell Disease Stem cell therapy offers the most immediate form of hope for people who suffer from sickle cell disease. Through engineered stem cells, all sickle ... read more When you get sick, do you ever wonder where medicines come from? In four minutes, this Clinical Trials 101 Whiteboard will show you how stem cell ... read more VIDEO: How Stem Cells Can Help Degenerative Diseases Watch our video about how stem cells could help people suffering from degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Type 1 Diabetes, or ... read more VIDEO: What are stem cells and why a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Stem Cell Research

Diabetes And Stem Cell Research

Stem cell research is in progress for the treatment of diabetes Understanding the root causes of diabetes has eluded researchers for many years now. The way in which the immune system causes the destruction of precious beta islet cells within the pancreas of type 1 diabetics is generally understood to be the key. The ultimate goal, which has so far proved elusive, is a cure for diabetes , which could potentially be available for both types of diabetes through stem cell research. Stem cells are a form of cell that is yet to develop a specific set of traits. However, what stem cells have in abundance is the potential to develop into a number of different forms. Stem cell research covers the scientific study of these stem cells. Stem cell research allows researchers to grow specific varieties of human cells in the lab and research how they behave and interact under different conditions. Stem cells open up a wide spectrum of diabetes research possibilities. In one example of diabetes stem cell research, researchers took cells from human intestine cells and disabled a gene which enabled the cells to produce insulin. Stem cells for the treatment of diabetes are able to come from a variety of sources. Stem cells in the research of type 1 diabetes Within recent years, stem cell research has become a very important part of the scientific understanding of type 1 diabetes. Research has demonstrated that stem cells can be grown in the lab. In 2004, the University of Pittsburgh grew insulin producing beta cells by introducing two genes cdk and cyclin d via a virus. The researchers were able to deactivate the virus and also prevent stem cells from growing further. The research could lead to a better availability of beta cells for future research purposes. Progenitor cells, related t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1 - Stem Cells Treatment Clinic

Diabetes Type 1 - Stem Cells Treatment Clinic

Diabetes Type 1 Stem Cell Treatment Diabetes is currently one of the most widespread diseases, and its prevalence is rapidly growing around the world. It is a common life-long condition and the number of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is increasing. For many, this means living with daily insulin injections and the possibility of long-term health damage. What is type one diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from T cell autoimmunity mediated destruction of the vast majority of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, the development of new therapies to control T cell autoimmunity and to preserve the remaining β-cell function is of great significance in managing patients with type 1 diabetes. Those diagnosed with T1DM are relying on exogenous insulin. Adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown in many studies as potential cure for T1DM, which could not only address the need for β-cell replacement but also the regulation of the autoimmune response to cells which produce insulin. Mesenchymal stem cells are able to control T cell autoimmunity. In both forms of diabetes, unless treated, blood sugar will rise uncontrollably, and over time can lead to complications such as cardiovascular, liver and kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy), as well as circulatory problems that may require limb amputation, vision loss, blindness (diabetic retinopathy), and nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy). How is type one diabetes treated at the moment? People with type 1 diabetes must test their blood sugar levels several times a day and inject insulin when it is needed. Unfortunately, it can still be hard to keep the blood sugar level normal, even with regular injections. Over time, a high level can cause serious damage to the hear Continue reading >>

Stem Cells Offer 'cure' For Paralysis

Stem Cells Offer 'cure' For Paralysis

by BEEZY MARSH and ROBIN YAPP, Daily Mail Scientists have announced that they have used stem cell injections to restore feeling to people paralysed in accidents. The breakthrough raises the possibility that spinal injury victims could walk again. A dozen patients paralysed from the waist down partly regained sensation in their legs, the scientists reported. They took stem cells from the patients' blood and injected them into an artery supplying the damaged part of the spine. Within two months, the volunteers reported having feelings in their legs for the first time since their accidents. Stem cells are 'mother cells' that can transform tissue. It is thought they either repaired the victims' spinal cords or encouraged the cords to heal themselves. In Britain, 400,000 people have spinal cord injuries that leave them with varying degrees of disability. Many suffered injuries in rugby games or in falls from horses or motorcycles. The worst damage is usually to the neck. Details of the breakthrough emerged in today's edition of the magazine Chemistry and Industry. Experts said the research - at the Sao Paulo University School of Medicine in Brazil - was a major advance. 'If it is true, it is a huge step, no question,' said Sam Pfaff, of the Salk Institute in California and a leader in cell biology research. 'Nothing like this has been done in humans before. There are some unanswered questions as to what blood stem cells are capable of. But if a paralysed person benefits, who really cares how it happens?' The Brazilian team removed and reintroduced blood stem cells of 30 patients who had been disabled from the waist down for two or more years. After treatment, researchers passed an electric current through their legs and measured the response in their brains. Twelve of the 3 Continue reading >>

Stem-cell Therapy - Wikipedia

Stem-cell Therapy - Wikipedia

This article is about the medical therapy. For the cell type, see Stem cell . Stem-cell therapy is the use of stem cells to treat or prevent a disease or condition. Bone marrow transplant is the most widely used stem-cell therapy, but some therapies derived from umbilical cord blood are also in use. Research is underway to develop various sources for stem cells, and to apply stem-cell treatments for neurodegenerative diseases and conditions such as diabetes , heart disease , and other conditions. Stem-cell therapy has become controversial following developments such as the ability of scientists to isolate and culture embryonic stem cells , to create stem cells using somatic cell nuclear transfer and their use of techniques to create induced pluripotent stem cells . This controversy is often related to abortion politics and to human cloning . Additionally, efforts to market treatments based on transplant of stored umbilical cord blood have been controversial. Further information: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation For over 30 years, bone marrow has been used to treat cancer patients with conditions such as leukaemia and lymphoma ; this is the only form of stem-cell therapy that is widely practiced. [1] [2] [3] During chemotherapy , most growing cells are killed by the cytotoxic agents. These agents, however, cannot discriminate between the leukaemia or neoplastic cells, and the hematopoietic stem cells within the bone marrow. It is this side effect of conventional chemotherapy strategies that the stem-cell transplant attempts to reverse; a donor's healthy bone marrow reintroduces functional stem cells to replace the cells lost in the host's body during treatment. The transplanted cells also generate an immune response that helps to kill off the cancer cells; this p Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How Could Stem Cells Help?

Diabetes: How Could Stem Cells Help?

Diabetes is a common life-long condition and the number of children being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is increasing. The symptoms can be controlled but there is no cure. For many, diabetes means living with daily insulin injections and the possibility of long-term damage to their health. All the cells in your body need energy. This energy is carried around the body as sugar (glucose) in the blood. There are several types of diabetes. What they all have in common is a problem with regulating normal levels of sugar in the blood. Normally, blood sugar levels are controlled by the release of the hormone insulin. Insulin is made by cells in the pancreas called beta cells that are arranged into clusters together with other pancreas cells. These clusters are called islets of Langerhans. In one human pancreas there are roughly one million islets. Where is the pancreas?: located in the abdomen, next to the small intestine and stomach. The cells in the pancreas that make insulin (beta cells) are highlighted in red in this video by Dror Sever and Anne Grapin-Botton. Continue reading >>

What Are Stem Cells? Research, Transplant, Therapy, Definition

What Are Stem Cells? Research, Transplant, Therapy, Definition

Stem cells are primitive cells that have the potential to differentiate, or develop into, a variety of specific cell types. There are different types of stem cells based upon their origin and ability to differentiate. Bone marrow transplantation is an example of a stem cell therapy that is in widespread use. Research is underway to determine whether stem cell therapy may be useful in treating a wide variety of conditions, including diabetes , heart disease , Parkinson's disease , and spinal cord injury . Stem cells are cells that have the potential to develop into many different or specialized cell types. Stem cells can be thought of as primitive, "unspecialized" cells that are able to divide and become specialized cells of the body such as liver cells, muscle cells, blood cells, and other cells with specific functions. Stem cells are referred to as "undifferentiated" cells because they have not yet committed to a developmental path that will form a specific tissue or organ. The process of changing into a specific cell type is known as differentiation. In some areas of the body, stem cells divide regularly to renew and repair the existing tissue. The bone marrow and gastrointestinal tract are examples of areas in which stem cells function to renew and repair tissue. The best and most readily understood example of a stem cell in humans is that of the fertilized egg, or zygote. A zygote is a single cell that is formed by the union of a sperm and ovum. The sperm and the ovum each carry half of the genetic material required to form a new individual. Once that single cell or zygote starts dividing, it is known as an embryo. One cell becomes two, two become four, four become eight, eight become sixteen, and so on, doubling rapidly until it ultimately grows into an entire sop Continue reading >>

Stem Cell Therapy For Diabetes Type 1 And Diabetes Type 2

Stem Cell Therapy For Diabetes Type 1 And Diabetes Type 2

New treatments and advances in research are giving new hope to people affected by Diabetes Type 1 and Diabetes Type 2. StemGenex Medical Group provides adult stem cell Diabetes therapies to help those with unmet clinical needs achieve optimum health and better quality of life. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for Diabetes Type 1 & Diabetes Type 2 may help patients who don’t respond to typical drug treatment, want to reduce their reliance on medication, or are looking to try stem cell therapy before starting drug treatment. To learn more about becoming a patient and receiving adult stem cell therapy through StemGenex Medical Group, please contact one of our Patient Advocates at (800) 609-7795. Below are some frequently asked questions about stem cell therapy for Diabetes Type 1 and Diabetes Type 2. Continue reading >>

Stem Cells Bring Back Feeling For Paralysed Patients

Stem Cells Bring Back Feeling For Paralysed Patients

Stem cells bring back feeling for paralysed patients For the first time, people with broken spines have recovered feeling in previously paralysed areas after receiving injections of neural stem cells. Three people with paralysis received injections of 20 million neural stem cells directly into the injured region of their spinal cord. The cells, acquired from donated fetal brain tissue, were injected between four and eight months after the injuries happened. The patients also received a temporary course of immunosuppressive drugs to limit rejection of the cells. None of the three felt any sensation below their nipples before the treatment. Six months after therapy, two of them had sensations of touch and heat between their chest and belly button. The third patient has not seen any change. The fact weve seen responses to light touch, heat and electrical impulses so far down in two of the patients is very unexpected, says Stephen Huhn of StemCells , the company in Newark, California, developing and testing the treatment. Theyre really close to normal in those areas now in their sensitivity, he adds. We are very intrigued to see that patients have gained considerable sensory function, says Armin Curt of Balgrist University Hospital in Zurich, Switzerland, where the patients were treated, and principal investigator in the trial . The data are preliminary, but these sensory changes suggest that the cells may be positively impacting recovery, says Curt, who presented the results today in London at the annual meeting of the International Spinal Cord Society. The patients are the first three of 12 who will eventually receive the therapy. The remaining recipients will have less extensive paralysis. The sensory gains, first detected at three months post-transplant, have now persi Continue reading >>

An Overview

An Overview

Nearly 400 million people worldwide are living with diabetes, and that number is expected to jump to almost 600 million by 2035, according to the International Diabetes Federation. For many people, diabetes can be controlled with diet, exercise and, often, insulin or other drugs. However, complications from diabetes can be serious and include kidney failure, nerve damage, vision loss, heart disease and a host of other health issues. In this section: What is diabetes? How is diabetes treated? How are we using stem cells to understand diabetes? What is the potential for stem cells to treat diabetes? At its most basic, diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot regulate or properly use sugar (called glucose) in the blood. The pancreas, which helps the small intestine digest food, has hundreds of thousands of cell clusters called islets of Langerhans where beta cells live. Beta cells produce insulin, which is released into the bloodstream when blood sugar levels reach a certain threshold. The insulin signals other cells in the body to take up sugar, the primary energy source for all the body’s cells. Type 1, also known as juvenile diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system attacks the beta cells in the pancreas. When the beta cells are damaged, they don’t produce insulin, or at least not enough insulin. Other cells never get the signal to take up sugar, so they don’t get the energy they need to function properly, and high sugar levels in the blood end up causing damage to the kidneys, eyes, nervous system and other organs. Type 2 diabetes, also called adult-onset diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, cells in the body become resistant to insulin. They don’t respond to the signals insulin sends out, so they don’t take up sugar from the blood. The beta c Continue reading >>

Bbc - Gcse Bitesize: Differentiation And Stem Cells

Bbc - Gcse Bitesize: Differentiation And Stem Cells

Most types of animal cells differentiate at an early stage - they become specialised for a particular function and cannot change into different types of cell. In mature animals, cell division is mainly restricted to replacement and repair. However, many plant cells keep the ability to differentiate. Stem cells can be made to differentiate to form different types of cell, such as nerve cells. Human embryonic stem cells can come from the eight-cell stage of embryo development. Human stem cells can come from human embryosembryo: The developing human offspring inside the womb or from adult bone marrowbone marrow: Soft tissue found inside bones that produces new blood cells.. They are able to develop into any kind of human cell. Note that you do not need to know any details of how this happens for the examination. Stem cells have the potential to be used in new treatments for conditions such as Parkinson's disease and paralysis. There are social and ethical issues concerning the use of human embryonic stem cells in medical research and treatments. Read on if youre taking the higher paper. Continue reading >>

The Power Of Stem Cells

The Power Of Stem Cells

Home For Patients Stem Cell Basics The Power of Stem Cells When most people think about about stem cells treating disease they think of a stem cell transplant. In a stem cell transplant, embryonic stem cells are first specialized into the necessary adult cell type. Then, those mature cells replace tissue that is damaged by disease or injury. This type of treatment could be used to: replace neurons damaged by spinal cord injury, stroke, Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease or other neurological problems; produce insulin that could treat people with diabetes and heart muscle cells that could repair damage after a heart attack; or replace virtually any tissue or organ that is injured or diseased. But embryonic stem cell-based therapies can do much more. Studying how stem cells develop into heart muscle cells could provide clues about how we could induce heart muscle to repair itself after a heart attack. The cells could be used to study disease, identify new drugs, or screen drugs for toxic side effects. Any of these would have a significant impact on human health without transplanting a single cell. What diseases could be treated by stem cell research? In theory, theres no limit to the types of diseases that could be treated with stem cell research. Given that researchers may be able to study all cell types via embryonic stem cells, they have the potential to make breakthroughs in any disease. How can I learn more about CIRM-funded stem cell research in a particular disease? CIRM has created disease pages for many of the major diseases being targeted by stem cell scientists. You can find those disease pages here . You can also sort our complete list of CIRM awards to see what we've funded in different disease areas. What cell therapies are available right now? Many cli Continue reading >>

Are Stem Cells The Next Frontier For Diabetes Treatment?

Are Stem Cells The Next Frontier For Diabetes Treatment?

Are Stem Cells the Next Frontier for diabetes treatment? Diabetes is a devastating disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The major forms of the disease are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system aberrantly destroys the insulin-producing beta cells (b-cells) of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is characterized both by insulin resistance, a condition in which various tissues in the body no longer respond properly to insulin action, and by subsequent progressive decline in b-cell function to the point that the cells can no longer produce enough additional insulin to overcome the insulin resistance. Researchers are actively exploring cell replacement therapy as a potential strategy to treat type 1 diabetes, because patients with this disease have lost all or nearly all b-cell function. However, if a safe and cost-effective means for replenishing b-cells were developed, such a treatment strategy could also be useful for the larger population with type 2 diabetes. One of the major challenges of cell replacement therapy is the current insufficient supply of b-cells from human organ donors. This article focuses on stem cells as potential sources for deriving new b-cells. Diabetes: A Critical Health Issue for the 21st Century According to the International Diabetes Federation, diabetes currently affects 7% of the world's population nearly 250 million individuals worldwide. 1 This total is expected to rise to 380 million by 2025 as a result of aging populations, changing lifestyles, and a recent worldwide increase in obesity. Although projections for increases in diabetes prevalence suggest that the greatest percentage gains will occur in Asia and South America, 2 , 3 all nations will experience a rising disease Continue reading >>

Stem Cells From Diabetic Patients Coaxed To Become Insulin-secreting Cells

Stem Cells From Diabetic Patients Coaxed To Become Insulin-secreting Cells

Stem cells from diabetic patients coaxed to become insulin-secreting cells If damaged cells are replaceable, type 1 diabetics wouldn't need insulin shots Signaling a potential new approach to treating diabetes, researchers have produced insulin-secreting cells from stem cells derived from patients with type 1 diabetes. The new discovery suggests a personalized treatment approach to diabetes may be on the horizon -- one that relies on the patients' own stem cells to manufacture new cells that make insulin. Researchers have produced insulin-secreting cells from stem cells derived from the skin of patients with type 1 diabetes. The cells (blue), made from stem cells, can secrete insulin (green) in response to glucose. Researchers have produced insulin-secreting cells from stem cells derived from the skin of patients with type 1 diabetes. The cells (blue), made from stem cells, can secrete insulin (green) in response to glucose. Signaling a potential new approach to treating diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard University have produced insulin-secreting cells from stem cells derived from patients with type 1 diabetes. People with this form of diabetes can't make their own insulin and require regular insulin injections to control their blood sugar. The new discovery suggests a personalized treatment approach to diabetes may be on the horizon -- one that relies on the patients' own stem cells to manufacture new cells that make insulin. The researchers showed that the new cells could produce insulin when they encountered sugar. The scientists tested the cells in culture and in mice, and in both cases found that the cells secreted insulin in response to glucose. The research is published May 10 in the journal Nature Communi Continue reading >>

Stem Cells 'cure Diabetes'

Stem Cells 'cure Diabetes'

What does the NHS Knowledge Service make of this study? "Stem cell transplants 'have freed patients with type 1 diabetes of daily insulin injections'" The Daily Telegraph has said. The news comes after research which allowed volunteers to go, on average, for two and a half years without using the multiple daily injections normally needed to manage their condition. The small study involved 23 patients with newly-diagnosed type 1 diabetes, a condition in which the immune system can rapidly destroy the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. These stem cell transplants apparently work by resetting the immune system so that the body stops attackingthe pancreas. The researchers themselves say that this treatment can only be used when the condition is caught early enough (within six weeks of diagnosis), before the pancreas has been irreversibly damaged andbefore anycomplications from very high blood sugar have developed. The study provides another avenue for research, but this treatment is still at a early stage of development and does come with some side effects and risks. Dr Iain Frame, research director of Diabetes UK, has emphasised that "this is not a cure for type 1 diabetes. This research was conducted by Dr Carlos EB Couri and colleagues from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil along with Dr Richard K Burt from the Division of Immunotherapy, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. The study was supported by a range of public and private organisations including the Brazilian Ministry of Health, Genzyme Corporation and Johnson & Johnson. The study was published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association. This was a prospective case series of 23 individuals who had received stem cell treatment to treat new onset cases of ty Continue reading >>

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