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How Can Lifestyle Choices Impact A Person's Risk For Developing Diabetes

How Food Choices Can Positively & Negatively Affect Your Health

How Food Choices Can Positively & Negatively Affect Your Health

Your diet provides the necessary building blocks for the body to produce energy and maintain good health. A good diet, therefore, is the foundation of good health. Your food choices can have a significant impact on how well your body functions. Deficiencies can impair life processes such as wound healing and metabolism. Likewise, some choices can increase your risk of disease. Dietary Guidelines for Americans provides a blueprint for making healthy choices. Video of the Day Your diet gives you a way to control your risk of heart disease by making healthy food choices. Fat is an ideal example. Your body needs fat to survive. However, you can prevent heart disease and reduce your risk by making better choices in the fat you include in your diet. The American Heart Association recommends choosing monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats rather than saturated fats such as butter. Doing so will help lower LDL, or bad cholesterol. LDL increases your risk of developing atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries. It is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. Maintain Healthy Weight The foods you choose can have a profound impact on weight maintenance. For example, reducing or eliminating empty calories found in foods with added sugars can help reduce your caloric intake and maintain a healthy weight. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, added sugars make up about 16 percent of the average American's diet, well over the recommended 10 percent. Many of these foods offer little nutritional value while contributing to weight gain. Being overweight increases your risk of developing a host of chronic health conditions including heart disease and high blood pressure. Your diet can also affect your risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes describes a condition wher Continue reading >>

2.1.1 What Is Diabetes?

2.1.1 What Is Diabetes?

Glucose Tolerance Tests (GTT) - A test that monitors the amount of glucose (sugar) in blood (plasma). This can help diagnose if someone has diabetes by checking their glucose levels over 2-3 hours to see how their bodies handle it. A person is given the instructions to fast for around 12 hours. Then blood plasma is taken for a baseline. They give them a concentrated drink full of sugar and monitor how much glucose is in their system after intervals. By 3 hours, their glucose should be back to baseline. Otherwise, there is a good chance that they are diabetic. Insulin Level Tests (ILT) - A test that monitors the level of insulin (hormone) in blood. This can help diagnose what kind of diabetes a person has if they have been determined by the GTT to be diabetic. Type 1 diabetics can't make insulin while Type 2 diabetics make insulin but it is ineffective in allowing glucose to enter cells. Specialists would once again take the patient's blood plasma at intervals after ingesting the sugar drink and at baseline level. This will show if the body is producing insulin or isn't to determine diabetes type. Patient A- An overweight 27 year-old woman who has had recent symptoms of excessive thirst and mood swings. She doesn't exercise much and has a poor diet. She has no family history of diabetes and her urinalysis test was normal. She is being tested because her symptoms are similar to those of diabetics and she doesn't exercise enough and has a poor diet. Patient B- A 48 year old man who has had recent symptoms of thirst and urination. After fainting twice, he goes in for a checkup. He has high blood pressure and high cholesterol. He walks occasionally. He has a heavy carbohydrate diet and a family history of diabetes. An urinalysis test showed ketones ( an acid produced when bo Continue reading >>

Behaviors That Increase Risk For Heart Disease

Behaviors That Increase Risk For Heart Disease

Your lifestyle choices can increase your risk for heart disease and heart attack. To reduce your risk, your doctor may recommend changes to your lifestyle. The good news is that healthy behaviors can lower your risk for heart disease. Diets high in saturated fats, trans fat, and cholesterol have been linked to heart disease and related conditions, such as atherosclerosis. Also, too much salt (sodium) in the diet can raise blood pressure levels. Not getting enough physical activity can lead to heart disease. It also can increase the chances of having other medical conditions that are risk factors, including obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Regular physical activity can lower your risk for heart disease. Obesity is excess body fat. Obesity is linked to higher “bad” cholesterol and triglyceride levels and to lower “good” cholesterol levels. In addition to heart disease, obesity can also lead to high blood pressure and diabetes. Talk to your health care team about a plan to reduce your weight to a healthy level. Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure levels and the risk for heart disease. It also increases levels of triglycerides, a form of cholesterol, which can harden your arteries. Women should have no more than 1 drink a day. Men should have no more than 2 drinks a day. Tobacco use increases the risk for heart disease and heart attack. Cigarette smoking can damage the heart and blood vessels, which increases your risk for heart conditions such as atherosclerosis and heart attack. Also, nicotine raises blood pressure, and carbon monoxide reduces the amount of oxygen that your blood can carry. Exposure to other people’s secondhand smoke can increase the risk for heart disease even for nonsmokers. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Disease

Lifestyle Disease

Lifestyle diseases are defined as diseases linked with the way people live their life. This is commonly caused by alcohol, drug and smoking abuse as well as lack of physical activity and unhealthy eating. Diseases that impact on our lifestyle are heart disease, stroke, obesity and type II diabetes.[1] The diseases that appear to increase in frequency as countries become more industrialized and people live longer. They can include Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, atherosclerosis, asthma, cancer, chronic liver disease or cirrhosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, metabolic syndrome, chronic renal failure, osteoporosis, stroke, depression, obesity and vascular dementia. In the U.K the death rate is four times higher from respiratory disease caused by an unhealthy lifestyle[2] Some commenters maintain a distinction between diseases of longevity and diseases of civilization. Certain diseases, such as diabetes, dental caries and asthma, appear at greater rates in young populations living in the "western" way; their increased incidence is not related to age, so the terms cannot accurately be used interchangeably for all diseases.[3] Causes of the disease[edit] Diet and lifestyle are major factors thought to influence susceptibility to many diseases. Drug abuse, tobacco smoking, and alcohol drinking, as well as a lack of or too much exercise may also increase the risk of developing certain diseases, especially later in life.[4][5][6] Between 1995 and 2005 813,000 Australians were hospitalised due to alcohol [7] In many Western countries, people began to consume more meat, dairy products, vegetable oils, tobacco, sugary foods, Coca-Cola, and alcoholic beverages during the latter half of the 20th century. People also developed sedentary lifes Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Choices: Root Causes Of Chronic Diseases

Lifestyle Choices: Root Causes Of Chronic Diseases

Introduction Poor lifestyle choices, such as smoking, overuse of alcohol, poor diet, lack of physical activity and inadequate relief of chronic stress are key contributors in the development and progression of preventable chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and several types of cancer. Even though doctors encourage healthful behaviors to help prevent or manage many chronic medical conditions, many patients are inadequately prepared to either start or maintain these appropriate, healthy changes. Most patients understand the reasoning behind a healthy lifestyle even if they don’t understand the disease processes that can occur when they don’t maintain healthy habits. Despite an understanding of what constitutes a healthy lifestyle, many patients lack the behavioral skills they need to apply everyday to sustain these good habits. Nevertheless, healthy lifestyle modifications are possible with appropriate interventions, which include nutritional counseling, exercise training, and stress management techniques to improve outcomes for patients at risk and those who already have common chronic diseases. Medical studies show that adults with common chronic conditions who participate in comprehensive lifestyle modification programs experience rapid, significant, clinically meaningful and sustainable improvements in biometric, laboratory and psychosocial outcomes. For More Information On Cleveland Clinic Wellness experts at Cleveland Clinic Center for Lifestyle Medicine within the Wellness Institute have successfully used a system of group-based, hands-on interventions for more than four years. These interventions include nutrition, culinary techniques, physical activity, and stress management approaches of therap Continue reading >>

Does Eating Brown Rice Lower Diabetes Risk?

Does Eating Brown Rice Lower Diabetes Risk?

White or brown rice might be a matter of taste. But people who substitute brown rice for white rice for health reasons may be onto something, a new study from Harvard University implies. Yet doctors warn that there's more to this effect than the nutrition in rice alone. Researchers drew on data from over 200,000 subjects and found that those who ate five or more servings of white rice a week had a 17 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with those who rarely ate white rice. What's more, they found that those who ate brown rice regularly were overall less likely to develop diabetes. With those results, researchers estimated that subbing in a few servings a week of white rice with brown would result in a 16 percent decrease in diabetes risk. Play But diet and diabetes experts say these results may have more to do with type of person who tends to prefer brown rice than how the food itself affects health. "Maybe people who eat brown rice are more health conscious," said Dr. Charles Clark, professor of medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine. Because the study can only gauge associations between lifestyle choices and later disease, it's impossible to tell whether it's the rice that makes a difference or some other shared quality among brown rice eaters, he said. Indeed, researchers found that brown rice eaters as a group tended to be more physically active, leaner, less likely to smoke, and perhaps most importantly, had a higher intake of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains -- all choices that help lower risk of developing diabetes. "I think whole grains may be the big player and not brown rice alone," says Carla Wolper, a researcher at the N.Y. Obesity Research Center. But making the switch from white to brown rice may be a relatively pai Continue reading >>

'how Diabetes Affects My Daily Life'

'how Diabetes Affects My Daily Life'

Brian Hunte was born in Trinidad and now lives in London. He was diagnosed with diabetes around 34 years ago, when he was 43. He talks about living with the condition. "When I was diagnosed with diabetes, it was a surprise. I didn't feel unwell, but I had been losing weight and felt thirsty all the time. "I was drinking lots of water and going to the loo more often. I had to get up twice in the night to urinate, which wasn't normal for me." Seeing the doctor "When I described my symptoms to the GP, he said it sounded like diabetes symptoms. Blood tests confirmed I had type 1, which usually develops earlier than 43, but can develop in older people. "I was worried because I didn't know anything about diabetes. I didn't like the idea of giving myself injections. "At first, I was given tablets to stimulate the pancreas to produce insulin. I also had to change my diet. "I needed to avoid sugar, so I gave up cakes, chocolates, sweets, and sugar in my tea and coffee. It wasn't as difficult as I'd expected, but I confess I still eat cakes every now and then." Fried and sugary food "The doctors also recommended a healthy diet with no fatty foods, so no chips or anything else fried. I loved sausages, eggs, bacon and black pudding, but it wasn't too hard to give them up. "I ate more fibre and fruit (but fruit is sugary, so I don't have more than three portions a day), steamed or boiled vegetables and grilled meat. It was a normal diet, really. I could go to a restaurant with friends and order from the menu easily. "I never ate too much Trinidadian food because my wife is Irish. Growing up with three sisters in Trinidad meant I was never allowed in the kitchen. It was only when I emigrated to Dublin in 1959 that I learned to cook for myself. "I taught my wife some Trinidadian dishe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes is a condition that affects the body’s ability to use blood sugar for energy. The three types are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in childhood, although it can occur in adults also. Type 1 diabetes affects the body’s ability to produce insulin. This hormone is vital to helping the body utilize blood sugar. Without enough insulin, the extra blood sugar can damage the body. According to the American Diabetes Association, 5 percent of all people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a condition that affects a body’s ability to use insulin properly. Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes make some insulin. However, they can’t make enough to keep up with rising blood sugar levels. Doctors associate type 2 diabetes with lifestyle-related factors like obesity. Gestational diabetes is a condition that causes women to have very high blood sugar levels during pregnancy. This condition is typically temporary. Having risk factors does not mean that someone will get diabetes. Doctors don’t know the exact cause of type 1 diabetes. Family history of type 1 diabetes is considered a risk factor. According to the American Diabetes Association, the child of a man with type 1 diabetes has a 1 in 17 chance of developing type 1 diabetes. If a woman has type 1 diabetes, her child has a 1 in 25 chance if the child was born when the woman was younger than 25. Women with type 1 diabetes who give birth at age 25 or older have a 1 in 100 chance of having a child with type 1 diabetes. Having a parent with type 2 diabetes also increases diabetes risk. Because diabetes is often related to lifestyle choices, parents may pass on poor health habits to their children. This increases their risk Continue reading >>

Do Now (3 Min) Turn In Your Hw (diabetes Article Questions, Test Corrections) Answer The Following: 1.what Do You Know About Diabetes? 2.what Are Some.

Do Now (3 Min) Turn In Your Hw (diabetes Article Questions, Test Corrections) Answer The Following: 1.what Do You Know About Diabetes? 2.what Are Some.

Presentation on theme: "Do Now (3 min) Turn in your HW (Diabetes article questions, test corrections) Answer the following: 1.What do you know about diabetes? 2.What are some."— Presentation transcript: 1 Do Now (3 min) Turn in your HW (Diabetes article questions, test corrections) Answer the following: 1.What do you know about diabetes? 2.What are some treatments you know of? 3.What are complications/consequences of the disease if it is untreated? 2 This week Today: Diabetes intro Tomorrow: Diabetes continued Wednesday: Review Thursday: 5-week assessment – DNA, HBS, HIPAA, Intro Diabetes Friday: End of quarter, no school 4 Diabetes – What is it? Body is not producing or has lost sensitivity to insulin Insulin is a hormone that allows sugars (glucose) to enter into each cell of your body Insulin is produced in the body by the pancreas 5 Anatomy of the Pancreas A gland/organ that lies behind the stomach Secretes insulin from beta cells Secretes glucagon from alpha cells 6 Insulin & other hormones Insulin – hormone that lowers blood glucose Glucagon – hormone that increases blood glucose when needed Somatostatin – hormone that can suppress both insulin and glucagon when needed 7 How does Insulin work? A person normally secretes insulin in response to an elevated blood sugar level Insulin helps sugar move out of the blood and into cells Cells will not allow blood sugar in without insulin – this can cause a problem 8 Types of Diabetes Type I – body does not produce any insulin Type II – body is not making enough or is losing sensitivity to insulin Secondary – a consequence from another disease (Ex: pancreatitis, Cystic Fibrosis) Gestational Diabetes – Diabetes during pregnancy Pre-diabetes – an intermediate between normal and diabetes 9 Why isn’t t Continue reading >>

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

How Your Culture Could Influence Your Diabetes Risk

How Your Culture Could Influence Your Diabetes Risk

Diet and exercise aren't the only two factors we need to pay attention to in order to prevent and manage type 2 diabetes. Experts warn that we need to consider cultural background, as we may be predisposed to a geographical genetic risk. Your risk of developing diabetes doesn’t just depend on the kinds of foods you eat or how much you exercise. According to CEO of Diabetes Australia, Greg Johnson, it also depends on your cultural heritage. “There are many populations of people, living in Australia, who are more pre-disposed to developing diabetes because of their genes,” says Johnson. “People from China, India and the subcontinent, South East Asia, Middle East, North Africa are more pre-disposed to develop type 2 diabetes than people who aren’t from these countries. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), there were over 78 million people living across South East Asia with diabetes in 2015. This is expected to increase to 140 million by 2040. Research has also identified type 2 diabetes an increasing epidemic in Asia, characterised by an onset at a relatively young age and low body mass index. This may be because Asian people are genetically more likely to have less muscle and more abdominal fat, which increases insulin resistance. “There are many populations of people, living in Australia, who are more pre-disposed to developing diabetes because of their genes." However, the highest diabetes prevalence in the world (relative to the population) is found in the Middle East and North Africa, as it’s estimated that one in every 10 people living in the region has the disease. Across the Middle East and North Africa, there were around 35 million people living with diabetes in 2015, with IDF anticipating an increase to 72 million by 2040. It’ Continue reading >>

Diabetes And How It Can Affect A Person At Work

Diabetes And How It Can Affect A Person At Work

Many conditions can cause health issues in the workplace and long-term absence from work. One condition that is becoming increasingly prevalent is diabetes. Diabetes is the result of the body being unable to break down glucose into energy, either because the body doesn’t produce enough insulin to metabolise glucose or because the insulin produced by the body doesn’t work properly. Figures from Diabetes UK show that since 1996 the number of people with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. By 2025, it is estimated that five million people will have diabetes in the UK. Types of diabetes Type 1 diabetes: Develops when the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed so the body can’t maintain normal glucose levels. This accounts for only around 10% of all cases of diabetes and is controlled through regular, life-long insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes: This occurs when the body is not making enough insulin and is most common in middle aged or older people. However, it is becoming increasingly common in younger, overweight people and is often linked to lifestyle choices. To some extent, type 2 diabetes can be controlled through diet and exercise, although many people with type 2 diabetes will require medication to control glucose levels. Diabetes – warning signs Certain symptoms can suggest the onset of diabetes, and these include: feeling very thirsty; urinating more frequently, particularly at night; increased hunger; feeling tired; weight loss or loss of muscle bulk; slow-healing cuts or wounds; blurred vision; frequent b0uts of thrush. Risk factors for diabetes Type 1 diabetes: Family history: Having a parent or sibling with the condition. Genetics: The presence of certain genes indicates an increased risk of d Continue reading >>

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus or type-2 diabetes, is one of the major non-communicable and fastest growing public health problems in the world, is a condition difficult to treat and expensive to manage. It has been estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from the current value of about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years.[1,2,3] Individuals with type-2 diabetes are at a high risk of developing a range of debilitating complications such as cardiovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, nephropathy, changes to the retina and blindness that can lead to disability and premature death. It also imposes important medical and economic burdens. Genetic susceptibility and environmental influences seem to be the most important factors responsible for the development of this condition. However, a drastic increase of physical inactivity, obesity, and type-2 diabetes has been recently observed. The fact indicates that obesity and physical inactivity may constitute the main reasons for the increasing burden of diabetes in the developed world.[4,5,6,7,8,9,10] Fortunately, because environmental factors are modifiable, disease manifestation from these factors is largely preventable. Diet is one of the major factors now linked to a wide range of diseases including diabetes. The amount and type of food consumed is a fundamental determinant of human health. Diet constitutes a crucial aspect of the overall management of diabetes, which may involve diet alone, diet with oral hypoglycemic drugs, or diet with insulin.[11,12,13,14,15] Diet is individualized depending on age, weight, gender, health condition, and occupation etc. The dietary guidelines as used in this review are sets of advisory statements that give quick dietary advic Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Changes For Type 2 Diabetes

Lifestyle Changes For Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Lifestyle changes are often advised for people at higher risk of diabetes and those who are newly diagnosed with type 2, to help manage their diabetes. The recommended lifestyle interventions include: Taking two and a half hours each week of moderate intensity physical activity or one hour and 15 minutes of high intensity exercise. Losing weight gradually to achieve a healthy body mass index Replacing refined carbohydrates with wholegrain foods and increase intake of vegetables and other foods high in dietary fibre Reducing the amount of saturated fat in the diet Physical activity NICE recommend taking either 2 ½ hours of moderate intensity physical activity or 1 ¼ hours of intense exercise. Moderate intensity physical activity includes: Brisk walking Cycling on relatively flat terrain Water aerobics Hiking Rollerblading Using a manual lawnmower Vigorous physical activity may include: Some people may be able to be referred for structured or supervised exercise sessions. Weight loss Guideline issued by NICE recommend those that are overweight aim to lose weight gradually until a healthy BMI is achieved. A healthy BMI range is: Between 18.5 and 24.9 Or between 18.5 and 22.9 for people of South Asian descent For those with a BMI above the healthy range, NICE recommends aiming to achieve weight loss gradually, with a target to reduce weight by 5 to 10% over a period of a year. Weight loss can help to reduce the risk of developing diabetes and can enable people with existing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes to better control blood glucose levels. If you have a BMI of over 30, your GP may refer you to take part in a structured weight loss programme. People unable to achieve weight loss via lifestyle changes may be prescribed a weight loss pill called orlistat. Read mor Continue reading >>

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