diabetestalk.net

How Can I Tell If I Have Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Many people get a surprise when the doctor hands them a diabetes or a prediabetes diagnosis. They go to the doctor for a routine checkup or because of some specific complaint, such as back pain or fatigue, and their lab work comes back with the bad news that their blood sugar is way too high. More: 15 Common Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes If they were really paying attention to their bodies, however, they wouldn't be surprised. As diabetes develops, it announces itself in all kinds of ways, some of them subtle and others really in your face. Your mouth feels dry, and you want to keep your lips planted on the water fountain, despite the line of people forming behind you. Dehydration is actually about your brain, not your mouth, even though your mouth is dry. Don't believe me? Your brain cells need a steady supply of glucose. When your brain is bathed in overly concentrated sugar water, it will summon fluid from any source to dilute the uncomfortable fluid surrounding each cell. Your brain gets this fluid from other cells, which leads to dehydration. You may have the urge to drink copious amounts of fluid as your body tries to overcome the lack of water. Soda pop junkies, you're fooling yourself if you think that drinking soda will hydrate you. It never will. For now, drink more pure, filtered water. You can do it! It makes sense that if you are drinking more water because of constant thirst, then you will be urinating a lot too. You are staring at (or sitting on) the potty more than normal because there is too much sugar in your blood and your kidneys are getting a serious sugar bath. If your kidneys could speak, they'd say, "Hey, what's the deal here? I'm overwhelmed, so I'm going to pull extra water out of your blood to dilute all this sugar!" Essentially, the floodga Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes In Men

Signs Of Diabetes In Men

Have you had bouts of dizziness or unexplained irritability? Perhaps you’ve been feeling lethargic, with fatigue setting in by the middle of the day, even before hitting the gym? Maybe, you’re worried about your performance in bed? Believe it or not, all of these could be early signs of diabetes in men. Type 2 Diabetes is a disease characterized by the body’s inability to produce enough insulin. Sometimes, it could be the inability to use that insulin properly too. But, sometimes it could be a mix of both. If you’ve been feeling any of the above symptoms lately, chances are, your blood sugar levels are unstable. Research studies show that, biologically, men are more likely to get Type 2 diabetes, than women. But, this does not necessarily indicate that men are more vigilant about early symptoms. “A 40-year old man had been feeling tired for a whole year. It was only when he began to go to the washroom every hour that he finally came to see me. When we ran his labs, his HbA1c was at 22! A lot of internal damage must have occurred from blood sugar for years,” says Mahesh Jayaraman, Medical Researcher and Co-Founder of Sepalika. Here’s an important fact for you to chew on: Men, in general, tend to ignore early signs of T2D much more than women do. This is because of a tendency to bear it like a man. Often, symptoms of prediabetes are ignored as well. Prediabetes is a condition defined by slightly elevated blood sugar levels, that are not actually in the “dangerously high” range. Generally, men don’t get to the doctor before they have full-blown diabetes. Trust us when we say this – It’s not a good idea to ignore these symptoms of diabetes in men. Early detection and lifestyle changes make it so much easier and quicker to reverse prediabetes. General Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes, is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes mainly from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose get into your cells to be used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Too much glucose then stays in your blood, and not enough reaches your cells. The good news is that you can take steps to prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes. Who is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes? You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, type 2 diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older, have a family history of diabetes, or are overweight or obese. Diabetes is more common in people who are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander. Physical inactivity and certain health problems such as high blood pressure affect your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you have prediabetes or had gestational diabetes when you were pregnant. Learn more about risk factors for type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of diabetes? Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and urination increased hunger feeling tired blurred vision numbness or tingling in the feet or hands sores that do not heal unexplained weight loss Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people have no symptoms. Some people do not fi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Topic Overview What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes happens when your body can't use insulin the right way. Over time, the pancreas can't make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body's cells use sugar (glucose) for energy. It also helps the body store extra sugar in muscle, fat, and liver cells. Without insulin, this sugar can't get into your cells to do its work. It stays in your blood instead. Your blood sugar level then gets too high. High blood sugar can harm many parts of the body, such as the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. It can also increase your risk for other health problems (complications). Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, so that over time the body can't produce insulin at all. In type 2 diabetes, the body still makes some insulin, but it can't use it the right way. What causes type 2 diabetes? You can get type 2 diabetes if: Your body doesn't respond as it should to insulin. This makes it hard for your cells to get sugar from the blood for energy. This is called insulin resistance. Your pancreas doesn't make enough insulin. If you are overweight, get little or no exercise, or have type 2 diabetes in your family, you are more likely to have problems with the way insulin works in your body. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including staying at a healthy weight, making healthy food choices, and getting regular exercise. Some people don't have symptoms, especially when diabetes is diagnosed early. This is because the blood sugar level may rise so slowly that a person may not know that anything is wrong. The most common symptoms of high blood sugar include: Feeling very thirsty. Urinat Continue reading >>

If I Have Type 2 Diabetes, How Often Should I Check My Blood Sugar?

If I Have Type 2 Diabetes, How Often Should I Check My Blood Sugar?

Besides checking for low blood sugar, monitoring blood sugar can be very helpful in your overall diabetes care. If you are only on medicines by mouth and your sugars have been under good control, it is reasonable to check your sugars no more than once daily, usually fasting when you first get up. If your sugars have been doing well for a very long time, it is even reasonable to space it less frequently than that. I usually advise patients in these situations not to completely give up checking their blood sugar at home because if it starts rising, it won’t be noticed until your next doctors’ visit, which could be months away. If you are on oral medicine and the sugars are not on under good control, then I do ask that the patient monitor their sugar on a daily basis. Not only do I want to know what fasting sugars are running, but I am also interested in seeing how their blood sugar changes after a meal. It can give me information about how well you are doing on your diabetic diet as well as how the oral medicine is working. Therefore, I will often ask for blood sugar readings 2 hours after one or more meals daily when blood sugars are not well controlled on oral medicine. It is very helpful to check your blood sugar more frequently when you are on insulin, whether you take a once-a-day long acting insulin alone, whether you take a long-acting insulin daily combined with short-acting insulin at each meal or whether you take an insulin mixture like 70/30 or 75/25 insulin. Checking your morning sugar daily before breakfast while on insulin therapy lets me know if your longer acting insulin is doing its job, or if its dosage needs to be adjusted. In addition to that, if you also take a short-acting insulin with your meals, checking your sugar before lunch and dinner also Continue reading >>

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

A A A Are There Home Remedies (Diet, Exercise, and Glucose Monitoring) for Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition characterized by the body's inability to regulate glucose (sugar) levels in blood. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but the body is not able to use the insulin effectively. The cause of type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune reaction. Combinations of genetic risk factors and unhealthy lifestyle choices cause type 2 diabetes. The main diagnostic test for diabetes is measurement of the blood glucose level. Changes in lifestyle and diet may be adequate to control some cases of type 2 diabetes. Others with type 2 diabetes require medications. Insulin is essential treatment for type 1 diabetes. No effective approach yet exists to prevent type 1 diabetes. Prevention of type 2 diabetes can be accomplished in some cases by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, sustaining a healthy lifestyle. Prediabetes is a condition that can occur before development of type 2 diabetes. Complications of any type of diabetes include damage to blood vessels, leading to heart disease or kidney disease. Damage to blood vessels in the eye can result in vision problems including blindness. Nerve damage can occur, leading to diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a set of related diseases in which the body cannot regulate the amount of sugar (specifically, glucose) in the blood. The blood delivers glucose to provide the body with energy to perform all daily activities. The liver converts the food a person eats into glucose. The glucose is then released into the bloodstream from the liver between meals. In a healthy person, several hormones tightly regulate the blood glucose level, primarily insulin. Insulin is Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Early Signs, And Complications

Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Early Signs, And Complications

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can develop at any age, although it is more common in middle-aged and older adults. But what are the early signs and symptoms of this condition? Type 2 diabetes results in high blood sugar levels and is believed to affect 29.1 million Americans. It accounts for up to 95 percent of all diabetes cases, according to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In this article, we explore the early signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes. We also look at the associated risk factors and potential complications of the condition. Contents of this article: What is type 2 diabetes? People with type 2 diabetes do not make or use insulin correctly. Insulin is a hormone that regulates movement of blood glucose (sugar) into cells. Blood glucose is the body's source of energy and comes from food. When sugar cannot enter cells, it builds up and the body is unable to rely on it for energy. If the body is unable to get glucose, the result is symptoms of type 2 diabetes. A doctor may suspect diabetes if a person's blood sugar levels are above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Symptoms of type 2 diabetes There are a number of symptoms of type 2 diabetes that people should be aware of. Awareness of these may help them get advice and a possible diagnosis. The sooner someone with type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, the sooner they can begin treatment to manage the condition. Symptoms include the following: Frequent urination and increased thirst: When excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the body's tissues. Excessive thirst occurs, causing people with type 2 diabetes to drink and urinate more. Increased hunger: In type 2 diabetes the body does not have enough insulin to send g Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In fact, about 95% of people who have diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Insulin and beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetes Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. (More specifically, insulin is made by special cells in the pancreas, called beta cells.) The pancreas releases insulin to help the body use sugar. Insulin helps move sugar from the bloodstream to the cells, where it is used as energy. When blood sugar levels rise, such as after meals, the pancreas releases more insulin. When blood sugar levels are low, the pancreas releases less insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes some insulin, but the body does not respond to it the way it used to. This is called insulin resistance. Having too much body fat can contribute to insulin resistance. As a result of insulin resistance, the body needs more insulin to work. At first, the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are able to keep up with the higher levels of blood sugar, and the pancreas churns out more insulin. But after a while, as more beta cells in the pancreas stop working, the pancreas is not able to keep up with the heavy demand and starts to give out, making less and less insulin until, in many people, it finally makes little to none. As a result of this lower amount of insulin, the sugar stays in the bloodstream, where it builds up and becomes too high. When blood sugar stays high for a long time, there’s a greater risk of developing some diabetes-related problems, like problems with the eyes (diabetic retinopathy) and the nerves in places like the hands and feet (neuropathy). This is why it is so important to keep blood sugar under control. People with type 2 diabetes need help controlling their blood sugar. The first things doctors usually s Continue reading >>

7 Early Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Early Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a preventable disease that affects more than 9 percent of the U.S. population, or about 29 million people. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter — some 8 million people — remain undiagnosed. With complications including nerve damage, kidney damage, poor blood circulation, and even death, it’s important for us all to know the early signs of type 2 diabetes. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a condition that makes it difficult for the body to manage glucose levels in the blood — something typically regulated by a hormone known as insulin. This can be because your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, the cells don’t respond to insulin correctly, or a combination of both. Obesity is a major risk factor for the disease. While most common in adults, it is increasingly being diagnosed in children, in part due to the childhood obesity epidemic. Long-term uncontrolled blood sugar levels can lead to complications like nerve damage, kidney damage, hearing impairment, skin problems, eye damage, and heart disease. Some of these complications, like poor circulation, can eventually lead to amputations, most commonly of the feet or legs. Preventing these complications requires a diagnosis and consistent treatment. Identifying the early symptoms of type 2 diabetes can make this possible. Learn More About Type 2 Diabetes The early signs of this disease are not always obvious. They may develop slowly over time, making them hard to identify. Many are asymptomatic. Because they can worsen over a period of years, type 2 diabetes may remain undiagnosed longer than other, more obvious conditions. 1. Frequent Urination Also known as polyuria, frequent and/or excessive urination is a sign that your blood sugar is Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

The Facts Diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot properly store and use fuel for energy. The body's main fuel is a form of sugar called glucose, which comes from food (after it has been broken down). Glucose enters the blood and is used by cells for energy. To use glucose, the body needs a hormone called insulin that's made by the pancreas. Insulin is important because it allows glucose to leave the blood and enter the body's cells. Diabetes develops when the body can't make any or enough insulin, and/or when it can't properly use the insulin it makes. For some people with diabetes, the body becomes resistant to insulin. In these cases, insulin is still produced, but the body does not respond to the effects of insulin as it should. This is called insulin resistance. Whether from not enough insulin or the inability to use insulin properly, the result is high levels of glucose in the blood, or hyperglycemia. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult onset diabetes. However, more and more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes due to the rise in obesity. Some people do not have diabetes but also do not handle glucose as well as normal. This is called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Up to 40% of people with IGT will eventually develop type 2 diabetes. Causes In type 2 diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin and/or the body does not use it properly. No one knows the exact cause of type 2 diabetes, but it's more likely to occur in people who: are over 40 years of age are overweight have a family history of diabetes developed gestational diabetes during a pregnancy have given birth to a baby that is more than 4 kg (9 l Continue reading >>

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes symptoms Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90% of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. "Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don't know it," says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, see your doctor. Watch the video: 5 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Increased urination, excessive thirst If you need to urinate frequently—particularly if you often have to get up at night to use the bathroom—it could be a symptom of diabetes. The kidneys kick into high gear to get rid of all that extra glucose in the blood, hence the urge to relieve yourself, sometimes several times during the night. The excessive thirst means your body is trying to replenish those lost fluids. These two symptoms go hand in hand and are some of "your body's ways of trying to manage high blood sugar," explains Dr. Collazo-Clavell. Weight loss Overly high blood sugar levels can also cause rapid weight loss, say 10 to 20 pounds over two or three months—but this is not a healthy weight loss. Because the insulin hormone isn't getting glucose into the cells, where it can be used as energy, the body thinks it's starving and starts breaking down protein from the muscles as an alternate source of fuel. The kidneys are also working overtime to eliminate the excess sugar, and this leads to a loss of calories (and can harm the kidneys). "These are processes that require a lot of energy," Dr. Collazo-Clavell notes. "You create a calorie deficit." Hunger Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Topic Overview What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes happens when your body can't use insulin the right way. Over time, the pancreas can't make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body's cells use sugar (glucose) for energy. It also helps the body store extra sugar in muscle, fat, and liver cells. Without insulin, this sugar can't get into your cells to do its work. It stays in your blood instead. Your blood sugar level then gets too high. High blood sugar can harm many parts of the body, such as the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. It can also increase your risk for other health problems (complications). Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, so that over time the body can't produce insulin at all. In type 2 diabetes, the body still makes some insulin, but it can't use it the right way. What causes type 2 diabetes? You can get type 2 diabetes if: Your body doesn't respond as it should to insulin. This makes it hard for your cells to get sugar from the blood for energy. This is called insulin resistance. Your pancreas doesn't make enough insulin. If you are overweight, get little or no exercise, or have type 2 diabetes in your family, you are more likely to have problems with the way insulin works in your body. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including staying at a healthy weight, making healthy food choices, and getting regular exercise. What are the symptoms? Some people don't have symptoms, especially when diabetes is diagnosed early. This is because the blood sugar level may rise so slowly that a person may not know that anything is wrong. The most common symptoms of high blood sugar include: Feeli Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day: How To Spot The Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

World Diabetes Day: How To Spot The Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

14 November is World Diabetes Day. Comprising hundreds of campaigns, activities, screenings, lectures and meetings, the aim of World Diabetes Day is to spread information about diabetes and raise awareness of the condition. The date also marks the birthday of the man who co-discovered insulin in 1922, Frederick Banting, who . While the 10% of those with Type 1 diabetes are usually diagnosed from an early age, the 90% of sufferers with Type 2 can develop the disease at any age. Shadow Home secretary Diane Abbott, Oscar winning actor Tom Hanks and tennis great Billie Jean-King all suffer from Type 2, while Prime Minister Theresa May is a Type 1 diabetic. May has been a vocal supporter of World Diabetes Day tweeting: “When I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, it came as a shock. But to all of you with diabetes, on World Diabetes Day, I want to say this: Type 1 Diabetes should not stop you from fulfilling your ambitions.” Here’s what you need to know about Type 2 and how to spot the symptoms: What is Type 2 diabetes? Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce sufficient insulin to control the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Patients with Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for ten per cent of cases, cannot produce any insulin, while the 90 per cent with Type 2 either don't produce enough or their cells do not react to it. Yes and growing. Diabetes UK says the disease is "the fastest growing health threat of our times and an urgent public health issue". One person every two minutes is diagnosed with diabetes and almost 3.5 million people in the UK have the disease - more than double the level 20 years ago. In addition, there are an estimated 1.1 million Britons who have not yet been diagnosed. How do you develop diabetes? Type 2 diabetes usually develop Continue reading >>

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs

Diabetes Warning Signs Because type 2 diabetes can lead to some serious health complications, it's important to be aware of any diabetes warning signs and get tested for diabetes, if you have these symptoms. Treating diabetes early, when treatment is most effective, can help prevent these diabetes complications. We'll explain the various diabetes warning signs and also warning signs of specific diabetes problems. Discover why it's important to listen to your body and alert your doctor if you notice any new signs or problems. Warning Signs of Diabetes Sometimes type 2 diabetes can develop without any warnings signs. In fact, about a third of all people who have type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. That's why it's important to talk to your doctor about your risk for diabetes and determined if you should be tested. Common warnings signs of diabetes include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blurred vision Diabetic coma (loss of consciousness) If you have any of the above mentioned warnings signs of diabetes, give your doctor a call and schedule a diabetes test. With the right diabetes diet, regular exercise, and medications, if needed, you can manage type 2 diabetes and live an active, productive life. If you have symptoms of the following diabetes complications, it's important to seek immediate medical attention. Each brief discussion links to more in-depth information. Hypoglycemia and Diabetes As you'll learn in this health topic, hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of sugar or glucose in the blood drops too low to fuel the body. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a condition that results from a variety of causes. Hypoglycem Continue reading >>

Signs, Symptoms And Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Signs, Symptoms And Diagnosis Of Diabetes

The signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes usually develop quickly, especially in children, over a period of weeks. In babies and young children, the first indication of Type 1 diabetes may be a yeast infection that causes a severe diaper rash that's far worse than the common red, puffy and tender skin rash. In young children and infants, lethargy, dehydration and abdominal pain also may indicate Type 1 diabetes. Once the symptoms appear, a blood test generally will reveal very high blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes can be detected easily during a routine screening exam and blood test. However, it frequently can go undiagnosed for years unless a physician draws a blood sample to check the blood glucose. In the early stages of Type 2 diabetes, you experience few to no noticeable signs of the disease. As time goes by and the untreated blood glucose continues to rise, symptoms begin. If you're over 40 or have parents or siblings with diabetes, be sure to have your blood glucose checked routinely. The most common symptoms of undiagnosed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are: Extreme thirst and a greater need to urinate: As excess glucose (sugar) builds up in the bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. The loss of fluid makes you thirsty. As a result, you may drink and urinate more than usual. Frequent hunger: Without enough insulin to move sugar into the cells (Type 1) or insulin resistance prohibiting insulin from entering the cells (Type 2), the muscles and organs are low on energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss: Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, rapid weight loss sometimes occurs. Without the energy that glucose supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often one of the first symptoms to be noticed. Blurred Continue reading >>

More in diabetes