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How Can I Prevent Genetic Diabetes?

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Tweet When people talk about prevention of diabetes, it is usually about preventing type 2 diabetes. In the majority of cases, type 2 diabetes is brought on by lifestyle factors which can often be prevented. These include an unbalanced diet, lack of activity, lack of sleep, stress, smoking and alcohol. By making lifestyles changes, you can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes prevention overview Leading doctors and researchers point to excessive levels of insulin as the likely reason why insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes develops. Strategies such as low-carb diets and exercise help to reduce levels of insulin and are therefore effective for preventing type 2 diabetes from developing. There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, some of which are preventable, such as weight gain around the middle (central obesity), high cholesterol/triglyceride levels and high blood pressure. Losing weight, adopting more activity into your day, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol intake can also help towards lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and improving your all-round health. Diet and preventing type 2 diabetes Diet is the most important part of lifestyle change. The adage that you can’t outrun a bad diet is true. It is much easier to lose weight on a good diet even if you are struggling to do exercise, than it is through exercise if you’re eating a poor diet. Effective diets to prevent type 2 diabetes are those that do not cause your body to produce a lot of insulin. Carbohydrate has the biggest demand on insulin and so any diet that helps reduce carbohydrate intake will help towards reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Cutting out sugary food and drink and refined grains such as white bread and white rice is a good Continue reading >>

Reducing Diabetes Risks For The Whole Family

Reducing Diabetes Risks For The Whole Family

Diabetes is a disease that affects more and more Americans every day: Almost 26 million children and adults in the United States now have diabetes, and another 79 million US residents are living with prediabetes, a condition in which blood tests show a blood glucose level that is higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes have an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Blood relatives of people with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes also have a higher risk of developing the same type of diabetes as their family member. And people who have diabetes run the risk of developing long-term complications associated with diabetes. In some cases, being aware of having a heightened risk for diabetes enables a person to be proactive about reducing the risk. For example, people with prediabetes and blood relatives of people with Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by making lifestyle changes, such as increased physical activity, that burn calories, lower blood glucose levels, and encourage weight maintenance or weight loss. Close relatives of people with Type 1 diabetes can have their risk of developing the condition assessed through blood tests. While no one yet knows how to prevent Type 1 diabetes, people determined to be at high risk can be followed closely, so that if they develop diabetes, they can be diagnosed early and be started on treatment as early as possible. People who already have diabetes can lower their risk of developing long-term complications by taking steps to manage their blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol levels. Diabetes and genetics The reasons that diabetes runs in families are complex, and they differ between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In both cases, ho Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Genetic?

Is Diabetes Genetic?

Diabetes is a complex disease. Several factors must come together for a person to develop Type 2 Diabetes. While genetics may influence whether you’ll get this disease or not, other factors like environmental risk factors and a sedentary lifestyle also play a huge role. So, is type 2 diabetes genetic? And if not, which type of diabetes is genetic? Those are the questions we are faced with today. And unfortunately, the answer is not that simple. Yes, genetics can play a role in increasing the risk for both Diabetes Type 1 as well as Diabetes Type 2, but genes alone will not determine whether you will develop diabetes or not. Will You Get Diabetes If It Runs In Your Family? If you’ve just been diagnosed with diabetes, chances are that you’re not the first person in your family who has diabetes. The details of whether diabetes can be inherited, and how this occurs, are not clear yet. About 10% of patients diagnosed with insulin-dependent Type 1 diabetes have a first degree relative with this type of diabetes. By first degree relative, we mean father, mother, sibling, twin and child. However, when it comes to the more common type of diabetes, which is Diabetes Type 2, it has a tendency to occur in families, but this is also not very strong and not predictable. A Swedish study on Metabolic Consequences of a Family History of Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus concluded that abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and decreased resting metabolic rate are characteristic features of first-degree relatives of patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (in other words, Diabetes Type 2). And that the decrease in resting metabolic rate is partially related to the degree of abdominal obesity. Many doctors with clinical practice treating diabetes believe that thi Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Diabetes

How To Prevent Diabetes

If diabetes were an infectious disease, the United States would be in the midst of an epidemic. With 24 million Americans diagnosed and 6 million Americans unaware that they have diabetes, it’s projected that 48 million people will have diabetes by 2050. The symptoms associated with diabetes are sprawling, ranging from weight gain to vision complications to nerve damage so severe it results in the loss of a limb. Living with diabetes can be an emotional roller coaster for the person diagnosed, and their loved ones. Like MedicoRx® Specialty Pharmacy on Facebook! The one promising thing about diabetes is that there is a lot we can do as individuals to reduce our risk and prevent the onset of diabetes, despite our family or genetic history. Lifestyle and diet choices have a huge impact on whether or not people develop type-2 diabetes. By taking control of our health with mindful choices, we have the power to protect ourselves from diabetes. What is Diabetes? Type-1 diabetes constitutes about 5-10% of those who get diabetes. It occurs when the system permanently disables the insulin-making cells in the pancreas, so the body has no natural way of managing and storing glucose. Because the body doesn’t produce insulin, blood sugar levels can get very high or low if not closely managed. This is known as juvenile diabetes. Type-2 diabetes is what most people who have diabetes have, and it tends to slowly creep up on people. Type-2 diabetes occurs when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin, and insulin making cells get exhausted and begin to fail so that the body has no natural way of storing glucose. Insulin resistance happens when the body’s blood sugar levels are high over long periods of time, and cells stop responding to insulin prompting them to open to r Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

How To Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

Expert Reviewed In the past 30 years, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes has skyrocketed to such an extent that it is now viewed as an epidemic in the western world. From being a once fairly mild and rare ailment of the elderly to becoming a chronic disease, this type of diabetes affects people of every age, race, and background, and is now a major modern cause of premature death in many countries around the world. Someone dies from Type 2 Diabetes every 10 seconds worldwide.[1] Happily, there is a great way to prevent Type 2 Diabetes: establish and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Continue reading >>

Can This Prevent Diabetes?

Can This Prevent Diabetes?

Can a few carrots a day keep diabetes at bay? It sounds too good to be true, but might very well be the case for some individuals at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In a groundbreaking new report, published in the journal Human Genetics, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have concluded that people with a common genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes are less likely to develop the illness if they have elevated blood levels of beta carotene. More specifically, those consuming around 6.5mg of the nutrient every day (that's equivalent to half a cup of cooked carrots) appeared best off, though the link also depends on how their body metabolizes beta carotene. "What's neat here is that we're introducing a new role for a healthy diet and a healthy lifestyle," says lead study author Atul Butte, MD, PhD, associate professor of systems medicine in pediatrics at Stanford. "By coupling research about genetics and nutrition, we're showing that DNA doesn't mean destiny." To complete their analysis, Butte and his colleagues used data compiled on a national sample of adults by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The data, which is derived from blood samples, includes genetic information as well as details on an individual's nutrition and their environmental exposures—enabling unique research that pairs the impact of DNA with the effects of lifestyle choices and surroundings. "We know that, so often, it is a combination of genes and environment that contributes to disease," Butte says. "Having this genetic data at our fingertips is bound to allow for much more research into this interplay." More from Prevention: The 14 Best Foods For Diabetics Where type 2 diabetes is concerned, the genetic variant evaluated by investigator Continue reading >>

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Reduce Portion Sizes Portion size is the amount of food you eat, such as 1 cup of fruit or 6 ounces of meat. If you are trying to eat smaller portions, eat a half of a bagel instead of a whole bagel or have a 3-ounce hamburger instead of a 6-ounce hamburger. Three ounces is about the size of your fist or a deck of cards. Put less on your plate, Nate. 1. Drink a large glass of water 10 minutes before your meal so you feel less hungry. 2. Keep meat, chicken, turkey, and fish portions to about 3 ounces. 3. Share one dessert. Eat a small meal, Lucille. 4. Use teaspoons, salad forks, or child-size forks, spoons, and knives to help you take smaller bites and eat less. 5. Make less food look like more by serving your meal on a salad or breakfast plate. 6. Eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to send a signal to your brain that you are full. 7. Listen to music while you eat instead of watching TV (people tend to eat more while watching TV). How much should I eat? Try filling your plate like this: 1/4 protein 1/4 grains 1/2 vegetables and fruit dairy (low-fat or skim milk) Move More Each Day Find ways to be more active each day. Try to be active for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Walking is a great way to get started and you can do it almost anywhere at any time. Bike riding, swimming, and dancing are also good ways to move more. If you are looking for a safe place to be active, contact your local parks department or health department to ask about walking maps, community centers, and nearby parks. Dance it away, Faye. 8. Show your kids the dances you used to do when you were their age. 9. Turn up the music and jam while doing household chores. 10. Work out with a video that shows you how to get active. Let's go, Flo. 11. Deliver a message in person to a co-worke Continue reading >>

Genetics & Diabetes : What's Your Risk?

Genetics & Diabetes : What's Your Risk?

A school nurse anxiously wants to know if there is a reason why several children from her small grade school have been diagnosed with type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes. Is it an epidemic? Will there be more cases? Is a recent chicken pox outbreak to blame? A man in his 50s develops type 2 diabetes. His mother developed diabetes in her 60s. Should this man's brother and sister be concerned, too? What about his children's chances of developing diabetes? A married couple wants to have children, but they are concerned because the husband has type 1 diabetes. They wonder what the risk is that their child would have diabetes. A couple has three young children. One of the children develops type 1 diabetes. There's no history of diabetes anywhere in either parent's families. Is this just a fluke? What are the chances the other children will develop diabetes? Chances are if you or a loved one have diabetes, you may wonder if you inherited it from a family member or you may be concerned that you will pass the disease on to your children. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center report that, while much has been learned about what genetic factors make one more susceptible to developing diabetes than another, many questions remain to be answered. While some people are more likely to get diabetes than others, and in some ways type 2 (adult onset diabetes) is simpler to track than type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes, the pattern is not always clear. For more than 20 years researchers in the Epidemiology and Genetics Section at Joslin in Boston (Section Head Andrzej S. Krolewski, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Investigator James H. Warram, M.D., Sc.D., and colleagues) have been studying diabetes incidence and hereditary factors. They are continuing a scientific journey begun by Elliott P. Joslin, M.D., Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease, characterized by an error in the immune system. The immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing pancreatic cells. The hormone insulin is required to enable the transfer of sugar from blood into the cells. The consequence of the lack of insulin is a disturbed metabolism of sugars in the body and an increased blood glucose concentration. Why should you have your DNA analysed for predisposition to diabetes mellitus? We check your genome in numerous sites. The analysis tells you whether you have an increased risk of developing this common metabolic disorder. How is type 1 diabetes mellitus prevented or treated? The treatment regimen of diabetes mellitus depends on insulin. The main treatment goal is to maintain a blood sugar within the normal range, thereby preventing the complications of the disease. Various insulin products are used. Insulin is administered subcutaneously by insulin injection or insulin pump. More detailed description about type 1 diabetes Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diseases in the world. 2.8% of the world's population is affected by it; 10-20% of the affected individuals have type 1 diabetes mellitus and the remaining 80-90% suffers from type 2 diabetes mellitus. The white race is more commonly affected by the juvenile form, and men and women are equally affected. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by an error in the body's immune system. Under normal conditions, our body defends itself against bacteria and viruses by activating the immune system; in juvenile diabetes, however, the immune system attacks and destroys the body's own pancreatic cells which produce and secrete insulin. Consequently, the body begins to lack insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells and Continue reading >>

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

Science Behind Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Science Behind Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 diabetes can be viewed as a consequence of an incompatibility between modern dietary and lifestyle choices and our genetic makeup. This condition is largely preventable with gene-targeted nutritional and lifestyle intervention. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it but, overtime, it isn't able to keep up and can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that is fundamentally caused by a mismatch between our genetic makeup and our lifestyle choices, namely diet and physical activity. Numerous genes have been identified as risk factors. Among them about 10 genes are thoroughly studied for their causative etiology. Variations in these genes confer some impairment in insulin secretion and/or utilization, glucose and/or lipid homeostasis. People descended from regions or ethnic groups whose traditional dietary and lifestyle environment differ most from that of industrialized societies today are at higher risk due to genetic predisposition. However, if you carry genetic risk variants, you can still minimize your risk by understanding your genetics and choosing the right food and lifestyle options that are compatible with your genetic makeup. Table: Common genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes Gene Function and role in diabetes SNP (risk allele) Lipid Homeostasis FADS1 Enzyme involved in the synthesis of bioactive lipid molecules rs174550 (C) PPARs Transcription factors regulating energy homeostasis rs1800206 (G) rs1801282 (C) ADIPOQ Hormone secreted by fat cells that regulates insulin sensitivity rs10937273 (A) rs17300539 (A) L Continue reading >>

Can Exercise Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Your Genes May Be Key

Can Exercise Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Your Genes May Be Key

Some obese people have DNA that makes it tougher for workouts to fend off the disease, study suggests Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. TUESDAY, Sept. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For millions of overweight Americans, regular exercise remains a prime weapon against excess weight and the threat of type 2 diabetes. However, a new study suggests that the battle may be tougher for some than for others, depending on their genes. "While physical activity generally promotes good health, it may not be as effective for everyone when it comes to preventing or treating type 2 diabetes," said one expert, Dr. Ruth Loos, director of the Genetics of Obesity and Related Metabolic Traits Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City. While it's long been known that physical activity can cut diabetes risk, the influence of genes on this protective effect hasn't been clear, according to background information from the study. In the study, researchers led by Dr. Yann Klimentidis of the University of Arizona examined interactions between physical activity, genetics and diabetes risk in more than 8,100 white Americans, including 821 with type 2 diabetes. They found that exercise provided less protection against diabetes in people at high genetic risk for diabetes and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance, a precursor to full-blown diabetes, is a condition in which the body produces insulin but does not use it efficiently. The study was published Sept. 29 in the journal Diabetologia. While certai Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Diabetes In Your Dog

How To Prevent Diabetes In Your Dog

Home > Dog Wellness > How to Prevent Diabetes in Your Dog Diabetes is on the rise amongst human populations, especially in North America. Did you know it is on the rise in our dog population too? Diabetes is the result of a lack of insulin production or utilization. Insulin is required to process sugars, amino acids, electrolytes, and fatty acids, allowing them to absorb into your dog’s tissues. If enough insulin is not produced this process breaks down, causing cells to “starve” and die. This results in all kinds of problems, including tissues breaking down and organ failure. There are two types of diabetes found in both humans and dogs. Type 1 or juvenile diabetes that manifests at a young age is an inherited condition, and is not common in dogs. Type 2 diabetes generally manifests around 7 to 10 years of age in dogs and is the result of the body producing less insulin, or developing an inability to use insulin appropriately. This is usually a result of the dog having chronic inactivity and/or being chronically overweight. Symptoms of diabetes in your dog may manifest as increased thirst, increased urination, increased or decreased appetite, weight loss, lethargy, vision problems, urinary tract infections, and eventually, if undiagnosed, kidney failure. If pet owners observe these symptoms in their dog they are encouraged to seek veterinary attention to rule out other causes, or establish the presence of diabetes. Sometimes diabetes is discovered during a routine veterinary examination in abnormal blood glucose results. Much like in humans, daily glucose monitoring and insulin can be used to regulate your dog's diabetes, but there is no cure. So if possible, avoiding the condition is recommended. Causes and Prevention of Diabetes in Dogs Genetics In some dogs, t Continue reading >>

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