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How Can I Avoid Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is diagnosed during pregnancy when your body cannot cope with the extra demand for insulin production resulting in high blood glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is managed by monitoring blood glucose levels, adopting a healthy eating plan and performing regular physical activity. Effective management of gestational diabetes will reduce the risk of complications during pregnancy and the birth of your baby. Your healthcare team including your doctor, specialist, dietician and Credential Diabetes Educator, can help you with blood glucose monitoring, healthy eating and physical activity. There are three basic components in effectively managing gestational diabetes: monitoring blood glucose levels adopting a healthy eating pattern physical activity. Gestational diabetes can often initially be managed with healthy eating and regular physical activity. However, for some women with gestational diabetes, insulin injections will be necessary for the rest of the pregnancy. Approximately 10 – 20% of women will need insulin; however, once the baby is born insulin is no longer needed. This is safe for both you and your baby. After the baby is born, gestational diabetes usually disappears. A special blood glucose test (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) (OGTT) is performed six weeks after delivery to ensure that blood glucose levels have returned to normal. However, women who have had gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life and should be tested for diabetes at least every 2 – 3 years. If gestational diabetes is not well looked after (blood glucose levels remain high) it may result in problems such as a large baby, miscarriage and stillbirth. A large baby can create the risk of injury at delivery, caesarean delivery, Continue reading >>

Can You Prevent Gestational Diabetes?

Can You Prevent Gestational Diabetes?

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition that can occur during pregnancy. If you have gestational diabetes, it means you have higher blood sugar levels than normal during pregnancy. Approximately 9 percent of pregnant women experience gestational diabetes. If you do have gestational diabetes, it’s important to get treated quickly since it can cause problems for both your health and your baby’s. The causes of gestational diabetes are not fully understood and it can’t be prevented entirely. But you can lower your risk of developing it. Keep reading to learn more about this condition and what you can do to decrease your risk. The causes of gestational diabetes aren’t known, but it is associated with a variety of risk factors. Those factors include: being over age 25 being overweight having a close relative with type 2 diabetes having higher-than-normal blood glucose levels prior to pregnancy, or signs of insulin resistance, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome or acanthosis nigricans Some ethnic groups are also at a higher risk for developing gestational diabetes, and include: African-American Asian-American Hispanic Native American Pacific Islander The best way to lower your risk for gestational diabetes is by being healthy before you get pregnant. If you’re overweight, work on improving your diet, eating healthy food, and exercising regularly. Talk with your doctor about the best way for you to lose weight, since even a few pounds can make a difference in your risk level for gestational diabetes. If you’re inactive, start regular physical activity at least three times a week. After you’re pregnant, don’t try to lose weight, but do continue a healthy diet that focuses on vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Exercise moder Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Gestational Diabetes

How To Avoid Gestational Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Four Parts:Determining Your Risk FactorsLowering Your Risk Through Medical ScreeningLowering Your Risk Through DietLowering Your Risk Through ExerciseCommunity Q&A Gestational diabetes mellitus, sometimes also referred to as (GDM), is a potentially serious condition that develops during pregnancy. Basically defined, gestational diabetes affects how the mother's body produces and uses insulin to control her blood sugar levels which can be harmful to both her and the baby. The good news is that GDM is can be prevented, or your risk for developing it at least minimized. There are no guarantees, but the more healthy habits you adopt before and during your pregnancy, the better you and baby will be. 1 Get a family history. The first step in preventing GDM is determining your risk factors for developing it. If it turns out that you are at high risk, then you and your doctor take steps towards lowering your risk and keeping you and the baby healthy. Before talking with your immediate relatives about their diabetic history, it might help to know the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, is an autoimmune disorder, whereas type 2 diabetes is closely tied to lifestyle and eating habits. Your risk of developing gestational diabetes increases if a close family member, such as a parent or sibling, has type 2 diabetes. Talk to your family to see if this applies to you.[1] 2 Determine your other risk factors. Besides heredity, there are a number of other risk factors in that you should think about and bring to your doctor’s attention.[2] These include: Being overweight before your pregnancy. Being 25 years of age or older. If you developed GDM in a previous pregnancy. If you previously had large baby (9 pounds or more) or a stillbirth. A his Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Foods To Avoid

Gestational Diabetes Foods To Avoid

Gestational diabetes occurs in 14 percent to 25 percent of all pregnancies. Obesity, maternal age, ethnicity and a diabetic family history are all factors that contribute to risk of gestational diabetes. An oral glucose test is performed between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy to test for this condition. If gestational diabetes is diagnosed, blood sugar control is necessary to prevent health risks for you and your baby. Monitoring certain foods in your diet and controlling your blood glucose will support a healthy pregnancy. Video of the Day For people with gestational diabetes, 40 percent to 45 percent of total calories should come from carbohydrate sources. If your daily calorie goal is 2,000 calories, approximately 800 to 900 of your total calories should come from this food group. Avoid eating refined flour sources like white bread or noodles. Instead, replace these foods with whole-grain choices. Also, eat a variety of fruits and vegetables. Limit intake of fruit and vegetable juices as many have a lot of added sugars. If you read the label of these juices, you will see that many of them have a lot of carbohydrates in a very small serving size. Milk and dairy products are also good carbohydrates to include in your diet when you have gestational diabetes. Pick healthier low-fat varieties of these foods in place of foods with a lot of added sugar, such as chocolate- or strawberry-flavored milk and yogurt with high-fructose corn syrup. Protein foods are also needed in a gestational diabetes diet and should make up approximately 20 percent of your total calories. Lean meat, poultry and fish -- along with eggs, beans, soy and tofu -- are good protein choices. Milk products and cheese can also be incorporated. Choose lower-fat versions if too much weight gain is a concern b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Avoid Gestational Diabetes By Throwing A Roof Raising Party

Avoid Gestational Diabetes By Throwing A Roof Raising Party

Click to listen to the audio… Transcript of “How to make more insulin, so you avoid gestational diabetes” One of the things you need to worry about as a pregnant women, is developing gestational diabetes. It’s risky for you and risky for junior. Unfortunately, it’s an all too common problem, because…. Being insulin resistant is part and parcel of pregnancy. Blame it on baby You can appreciate, growing into a brand new human being, is an energy intensive process. Dips in energy, can be catastrophic……so mother nature, stacks the deck in baby’s favour. Baby gets fed first. To achieve this, mother nature makes Mom’s power hungry cells, a little less sensitive to insulin. This insulin resistance is 100 % normal. By making it that much harder, to get the glucose gates open, the sugar molecules are shuttled across the placenta, where baby can use them to grow big and strong. But, it is a balancing act……….. Mom must be fed too Mom’s cells do need to eat too. So, plan B kicks in. The pancreas ramps up it’s game – the beta cells, whose job it is, to produce insulin – produce more insulin, to compensate for the insulin resistance. The production of more insulin happens because…….. the beta cells that are there, get bigger they produce more insulin and new cells arrive to help out The pancreas knows to do this, because the placenta, “unintentionally” tells them too. More than MAKE MILK The placenta is hard at work, directing the assembly of the milk factory, through lactogen hormones. Beta cells can intercept this message, because, they come with prolactin receptors. The make MILK signalling, also signals the pancreas to make more beta cells. Indirectly…. So how does this happen ? A team of researchers from Japan, pieced together the beta Continue reading >>

Pcos And Pregnancy: Preventing Gestational Diabetes

Pcos And Pregnancy: Preventing Gestational Diabetes

Pregnancy is an exciting time, especially because so many women with PCOS have been trying to conceive for years. Having PCOS and being pregnant, however, poses additional risks for women with the syndrome, especially for developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a condition of high glucose levels during pregnancy. Women with PCOS have an increased risk of developing GDM, regardless if they are overweight or not. Insulin levels significantly increase in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy as a normal part of pregnancy; the majority of women with PCOS already have high insulin levels. You are at high risk for gestational diabetes if you: Have PCOS Are obese Have previously given birth to a large baby (nine pounds or greater) Have had gestational diabetes with a past pregnancy Have glycosuria (sugar in your urine) before or during pregnancy Have a strong family history of diabetes Are of older maternal age Experience excessive weight gain during pregnancy If not well managed, GDM can cause significant problems during pregnancy and labor for mom and baby. The good news is that diet and exercise modifications can help to prevent GDM. Here are some of the most effective ways to reduce your chances of developing GDM during your pregnancy. Screen Early in Pregnancy After you find out you’re pregnant, glucose testing should be done as soon as possible to screen for GDM. If the results are normal, testing should be repeated by the standard screening time for all pregnant women, between 24 and 28 weeks gestation. While early testing won’t prevent GDM, interventions to maintain proper blood glucose levels that are started early on, will help to optimize pregnancy outcomes. Limit Sweets and Refined Carbs Since high sugar and refined carbs dramatically increase gl Continue reading >>

Preventing Gestational Diabetes

Preventing Gestational Diabetes

Pregnant or thinking about pregnancy? You should know about diabetes of pregnancy, called gestational diabetes, or GDM. Gestational diabetes usually goes away when you give birth, but it can complicate life for both mother and child. Gestational diabetes is a disease of insulin resistance, very much like Type 2 diabetes. Pregnancy increases insulin resistance, to save more sugar for the growing baby. That’s good when food is in short supply, but too much glucose in the blood can cause your baby to be too large. It increases risk for premature birth, respiratory problems, and low blood sugar for the infant after birth. Gestational diabetes puts baby and mother at risk for Type 2 later on. More than 50% of women who have diabetes of pregnancy will get Type 2 diabetes 5–10 years later. About 10% of mothers in the United States develop gestational diabetes. You may be at extra risk if you are overweight prior to becoming pregnant; have a family history of Type 2 diabetes; or have prediabetes, high blood pressure, or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women older than 25 and those who are of African, Native American, Asian, Latino, or Pacific Islander descent also have a higher risk of gestational diabetes, as do women with a history of gestational diabetes or a history of having large (over 9 pounds) babies. If you develop gestational diabetes, you will probably be treated with diet, exercise, and medications, often insulin. You’ll have a crash course in diabetes management. You can do that, but it’s much better to prevent it. Preventing gestational diabetes You can do a lot to prevent gestational diabetes. Here are some of the most effective ways found yet. • Exercise. In one large study, researchers found that women who got roughly four hours a week of physical a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Can It Be Prevented?

Gestational Diabetes: Can It Be Prevented?

Copyright © 1999-2001 [email protected]. All rights reserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consult your health provider. This particular web section on gestational diabetes is designed to present more than one view of a controversial subject, pro and con. It should be re-emphasized that nothing herein should be considered medical advice. CONTENTS Can Gestational Diabetes Be Prevented? Who Is Most At-Risk for GD? Why Try to Avoid GD? Pre-Conception Care and Testing Types of Blood Sugar Testing Available Pre-Conception Once You Are Pregnant: Care and Testing Once You Are Pregnant: Exercise Once You Are Pregnant: Nutrition Sample Nutrition Plan Other Common Nutrition Questions Summary Can Gestational Diabetes Be Prevented? If you are at increased risk for gestational diabetes, is there anything you can do to help prevent its occurrence? The truth is that no one knows for sure. Few studies have focused on preventing gd through proactive health measures, and few physicians are trained enough in nutrition issues to use it proactively, preferring to deal with it once it appears instead. Traditionally, physicians' emphasis is on INTERVENTION instead of PREVENTION, and this is often particularly true in obstetrics. Thus most women, even those at most risk for gd, are not given much guidance about possibly ways to lower their risk. Most OBs prefer to simply test more often instead, hoping to catch it early. There is some mixed evidence that careful attention to nutrition may help prevent at least some cases of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension; could this also help with gestational diabetes? Many midwives report anecdotally that they prevent or reduce the number and severity of gd cases through the use of Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes can cause a range of complications during pregnancy. Fortunately, a woman can help reduce complications by following a healthful diet. What foods should women eat and what foods should they avoid if they have gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs if a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin, during her pregnancy. This deficiency leads to high blood sugar. High blood sugar levels may cause problems for the woman and her baby if not managed properly. This article explains what type of diet a woman should follow during pregnancy if she has gestational diabetes. It also considers other treatment options for gestational diabetes and what complications may occur if the condition is not properly managed. Contents of this article: Understanding gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes each year in the United States. This type of diabetes occurs when a woman's body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin. Insulin is made by the pancreas and helps the body's cells to use sugar from the blood as energy. When a woman is pregnant, her body will produce more hormones, and she may put on weight. Both of these changes may mean that her body's cells may not use insulin as well as they used to. This is called insulin resistance. Becoming resistant to insulin means that the body needs more of it in order to use up the sugar in the blood. Sometimes a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin to keep up. This leads to a sugar buildup in the blood, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Symptoms of gestational diabetes may include: being unusually thirsty Continue reading >>

Avoiding Gestational Diabetes

Avoiding Gestational Diabetes

A new study sheds light on exercise and gestational diabetes Women who exercise regularly before conceiving are less likely to develop diabetes during pregnancy, according to a Harvard study. Brisk walking before pregnancy reduced the risk of gestational diabetes by 34 percent compared with walking at an easy pace. In contrast, women who watched at least 20 hours of television each week and did not exercise before pregnancy were twice as likely as exercisers to develop gestational diabetes. While lifelong physical activity clearly matters, previous studies show that women can also reduce their risk of diabetes by exercising during pregnancy. Your Growing Baby: Ovulation occurs; ideally, sperm will already be lying (er, swimming) in wait. Your Growing Belly: Though some women swear that they were aware of the moment of conception, most are oblivious. The radical hormonal changes of the first trimester don't kick in until implantation, which happens between three to five days after conception. If you've been trying to get pregnant, you may be waiting on the edge of your seat until a test can confirm your pregnancy. If you weren't trying, you may be on the edge of your seat for the same reason. Tips & To-Do's: Pregnancy Tests If you take a pregnancy test on the first day you miss your period, there's a 10 percent chance that you'll get a false negative reading, according to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. If you mistakenly believe that you are not pregnant, you might not avoid potentially harmful substances. In the interest of safety, assume you are pregnant and retest a week later. Learn more about the first trimester Things to think about this week Your breasts may be extra tender as early as a week or two after conception. "You're making so Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Avoiding Gestational Diabetes

5 Tips For Avoiding Gestational Diabetes

As with any pregnancy complication, gestational diabetes is one of those things that weighs heavily on the mind while carrying. Just the thought of having to endure it can put expecting mothers under tons of undue stress. Aside from the complications that can arise pertaining to your baby, mothers who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes while pregnant also have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes at some point during their lives. While there is no absolute guarantee that gestational diabetes won’t develop during your pregnancy, there are quite a few measures you can take to marginally reduce your risk; take a further look to find out what they are. 1. Get Screened Early Many factors like age, pre-pregnancy weight, and family history can put certain women at a higher risk for developing gestational diabetes, which makes catching issues early on essential. During all of your checkups, your doctor will test your urine sample for high sugar levels, but because gestational diabetes typically develops between 24 – 28 weeks, your doctor will usually do a glucose screening test around that time. As with all things pertaining to your pregnancy, you should keep a close eye on your development and alert your physician if anything seems strange. 2. Make A Pregnancy Plan Creating a comprehensive pregnancy plan is not only a fantastic way to stay on top of your milestones and development, but help you recognize and prevent complications like gestational diabetes. For example, as overweight women are more likely to develop diabetes during their pregnancy and since it is not advised to attempt to lose weight while carrying, it might be best to plan to lose about 5 to 7% of your body weight before conceiving. Planning to eliminate the risks before your pregnancy even beg Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Medical experts haven't agreed on a single set of screening guidelines for gestational diabetes. Some question whether gestational diabetes screening is needed if you're younger than 25 and have no risk factors. Others say that screening all pregnant women is the best way to identify all cases of gestational diabetes. When to screen Your doctor will likely evaluate your risk factors for gestational diabetes early in your pregnancy. If you're at high risk of gestational diabetes — for example, your body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy was 30 or higher or you have a mother, father, sibling or child with diabetes — your doctor may test for diabetes at your first prenatal visit. If you're at average risk of gestational diabetes, you'll likely have a screening test during your second trimester — between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Routine screening for gestational diabetes Initial glucose challenge test. You'll drink a syrupy glucose solution. One hour later, you'll have a blood test to measure your blood sugar level. A blood sugar level below 130 to 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 7.2 to 7.8 millimoles per liter (mmol/L), is usually considered normal on a glucose challenge test, although this may vary by clinic or lab. If your blood sugar level is higher than normal, it only means you have a higher risk of gestational diabetes. You'll need a glucose tolerance test to determine if you have the condition. Follow-up glucose tolerance testing. You'll fast overnight, then have your blood sugar level measured. Then you'll drink another sweet solution — this one containing a higher concentration of glucose — and your blood sugar level will be checked every hour for three hours. If at least two of the blood sugar readings are higher than normal, you'll Continue reading >>

Dietary Advice During Pregnancy To Prevent Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Advice During Pregnancy To Prevent Gestational Diabetes

Plain language summary What is the issue? Can dietary advice for pregnant women prevent the development of diabetes in pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which can cause health complications for women and their babies? Why is this important? Women with GDM have an increased risk of developing high blood pressure and protein in their urine during pregnancy (pre‐eclampsia), and of having a caesarean section birth. Their babies may grow large and, as a result, be injured at birth, or cause injury to their mothers during birth. Additionally, there can be long‐term health problems for women and their babies, including an increased risk of cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes. The number of women being diagnosed with GDM is increasing around the world, so finding simple and cost‐effective ways to prevent women developing GDM is important. Carbohydrates are the main nutrient affecting blood glucose after meals. The glycaemic index (GI) can be used to characterise the capability of carbohydrate‐based foods to raise these levels. Some diets, for example, those with low‐fibre and high‐GI foods, can increase the risk of developing GDM. It has been suggested that dietary advice interventions in pregnancy may help to prevent women developing GDM. What evidence did we find? We searched for studies on 3 January 2016, and included 11 randomised controlled trials involving 2786 pregnant women and their babies. The quality of the evidence was assessed as low or very low and the overall risk of bias of the trials was unclear to moderate. Six trials compared dietary advice with standard care, four compared advice focused on a low‐GI diet with advice for a moderate‐ to high‐GI diet, and one compared dietary advice focused on a high‐fibre diet w Continue reading >>

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