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How Can Diabetes Kill You

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Is So Dangerous

Why Diabetes Is So Dangerous

There’s a common saying in the diabetes community that diabetes won’t kill you, but it’s complications will. Still, according to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, with over 69,000 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death. [1] Add to that the common complications, like cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and infection, and you can multiply that number by 10! Yet despite these eye-opening statistics, I still see far too many people not taking diabetes seriously. They approach it as something that’s a nuisance rather than something that can and does cause major health complications, and yes even death, if uncontrolled. “Sometimes I pretend I’m not diabetic, but that’s a dangerous game.” – Unknown Diabetes is more dangerous than most people assume, and so it becomes easy for many people with diabetes to get lax in their efforts to manage the dysfunction. A 2012 GAPP2 (Global Attitude of Patients and Physicians 2) survey found that 22% of insulin-using diabetic patients missed a basal insulin dose during a 30-day period. [2] There are very real dangers diabetes poses if left unchecked or mismanaged, and one of my goals today is to motivate you into taking better care of yourself or helping a loved one manage the disease better. Why is diabetes so dangerous? Because if not managed correctly, it can wreak havoc on just about every system and organ in the body. Let’s take a look at some of the biggest risks diabetic complications pose: Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a very dangerous condition that can occur when patients neglect to take their insulin and have uncontrolled blood sugar. Since insulin is necessary to break down glucose as a sourc Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Prediabetes: How To Test For Pre Diabetes?

Diagnosing Prediabetes: How To Test For Pre Diabetes?

My quest started with first understanding prediabetes mellitus. I wanted to know the answer to what was really happening to my body, what to expect and how to manage it. I wanted to gather all pre diabetes information that is based on sound research, not just conventional wisdom. I wanted to understand why it happened to me and how do I prevent diabetes type 2. How do I stop prediabetes mellitus progression? Is there such as thing as pre diabetes type 2? Or pre diabetes mellitus? Or is it just an intermediate stage for any form of diabetes? How likely I am to get diabetes in the future? How soon? What could be the pre diabetes complications? I had many questions running through my head and so being a research scientist, I started my literature survey to find eveything about pre diabetes. Put simply, if you have pre-diabetes, you are at high risk of developing diabetes type 2, or diabetes mellitus. You also have an increased risk of developing heart diseases. Pre diabetes is a condition in which the blood sugar level is above its normal range, but still not high enough to be classified as diabetes. The normal range of fasting blood sugar level is supposed to be under 100 mg/dl. For diabetes, we are talking a fasting plasma glucose level of about 125 mg/dl. So, if you have fasting blood sugar level is between 100 mg/dl and 125 mg/dl, then you are considered prediabetic. I have listed additional pre diabetes tests later in this article. For a quick summary, here’s the infographic released by CDC in its 2014 report on diabetes and pre diabetes. But there are two specific categories of pre diabetes that you might fall into. If your fasting glucose level is between 100-125 mg/dl, then you have “Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG)”. If on the other hand, a two-hour oral gluco Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Here’s what you need to know about the life-threatening diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Symptoms can take you by surprise, coming on in just 24 hours or less. Without diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, you will fall into a coma and die. “Every minute that the person is not treated is [another] minute closer to death,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin. (Diabetic ketoacidosis most often affects people with type 1 diabetes, but there is also type 2 diabetes ketoacidosis.) Without insulin, sugar can’t be stored in your cells to be used as energy and builds up in your blood instead. Your body has to go to a back-up energy system: fat. In the process of breaking down fat for energy, your body releases fatty acids and acids called ketones. Ketones are an alternative form of energy for the body, and just having them in your blood isn’t necessarily harmful. That’s called ketosis, and it can happen when you go on a low-carb diet or even after fasting overnight. “When I put people on a restricted diet, I can get an estimate of how vigorously they’re pursuing it by the presence of ketones in the urine,” says Gerald Bernstein, MD, an endocrinologist and coordinator of the Friedman Diabetes Program at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. RELATED: The Ketogenic Diet Might Be the Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It? But too many ketones are a problem. “In individuals with diabetes who have no or low insulin production, there is an overproduction of ketones, and the kidneys can’t get rid of them fast enough,” sa Continue reading >>

Suicide By Insulin A Risk In People With Diabetes

Suicide By Insulin A Risk In People With Diabetes

Insulin typically saves the lives of those with diabetes, but it can also be a way for some people to kill themselves, a new review warns. People with the blood sugar disease tend to suffer higher rates of depression, the researchers explained. And suicide or suicide attempts using insulin or other diabetes medications that lower blood sugar levels may not always be an easy-to-spot attempt at self-harm, they added. "Some suicides with insulin are likely missed in people with diabetes, just as [suicide may be missed] in people without diabetes using other medications or after a car accident. Could a suicide using insulin be missed? Absolutely," said Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, vice president of lifestyle management at the American Diabetes Association. Insulin is a natural hormone produced by the body. Its job is to help usher the sugar from foods into the body's cells to provide fuel for those cells. But insulin is also a complex medication. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make enough insulin and must give themselves insulin to stay alive. People with type 2 diabetes don't use insulin efficiently -- this is called insulin resistance -- and eventually don't make enough insulin to keep up with the body's demands. At this point, people with type 2 diabetes also need to take insulin. Insulin can be given by multiple injections every day or via an insulin pump. Insulin pumps deliver insulin through a small tube that's inserted under the skin. The site of the insulin pump must be changed every few days. But once the tube is in, someone who uses an insulin pump only needs to push a few buttons to deliver a dose of insulin. However, getting the right amount of insulin is no easy task. Many factors affect the body's need for insulin. Exercise decreases the need. Foods that a Continue reading >>

What Are Some Myths About Type 2 Diabetes?

What Are Some Myths About Type 2 Diabetes?

There are a number of myths about type 2 diabetes. The most dangerous myth is the belief that diabetes isn’t that serious. In fact, type 2 diabetes kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Another popular misconception is that type 2 diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar. This myth probably stems from the fact that if you eat a lot of sugar, you may be overweight, and that can increase your risk for type 2 diabetes. But just because you consume a lot of sugar doesn’t mean you’ll end up with diabetes, which is caused by heredity and lifestyle factors, such as being overweight and not exercising. Another myth: Some people believe that if you have type 2 diabetes, you must eat only special foods. Not true. Your diet should be one that would be healthy for anyone -- low in fat, with vegetables, fruits, whole grains, lean meat and nonfat dairy products. The top 4 myths about type 2 diabetes are: Myth 1: "Diabetes is nothing to worry about -- it's just a 'touch of sugar.' I'm just borderline." Fact: Diabetes is a serious condition, but there's a lot you can do to take care of yourself. Myth 2: "If I take my diabetes pills, I don't have to worry about what I eat or whether I exercise." Fact: All three ways -- medication, meal planning, and physical activity -- work together to treat diabetes. Myth 3: "Once you have diabetes, there's nothing you can do to prevent health problems." Fact: Research has proven that keeping blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels on target can help prevent diabetes complications such as heart attack, stroke, and eye problems. Myth 4: "Now that I have diabetes, I shouldn't eat sugar or carbohydrates." Fact: These days, people with diabetes can eat sweets, carbohydrates, or any other food and still ke Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Causes Blindness - Topic Overview

How Diabetes Causes Blindness - Topic Overview

Over time, high blood sugar levels from diabetes lead to damage of the retina, the layer on the back of the eye that captures images and sends them as nerve signals to the brain. Whether diabetic retinopathy develops depends in part on how high blood sugar levels have been and how long they have been above a target range. Other things that may increase your risk for diabetic retinopathy include high blood pressure, pregnancy, a family history of the condition, kidney disease, high cholesterol, and whether you smoke. Early retinopathy The early stages of retinal damage are called nonproliferative retinopathy. First, tiny blood vessels called capillaries in the retina develop weakened areas in their walls called microaneurysms. When red blood cells escape through these weakened walls, tiny amounts of bleeding (hemorrhages) become visible when the retina is viewed through an instrument called an ophthalmoscope. To clearly see your retina, the ophthalmologist will enlarge (dilate) your pupils (which serve as a window to the back of your eye) and may also use a special dye to help identify blood vessels that may be leaking. Fluid from the blood also escapes, leading to yellowish "hard exudates." This type of damage does not cause problems with vision unless some of the leaking fluid is near the macula. (The macula is the area of the retina that is responsible for central vision.) An ophthalmologist who specializes in the treatment of retinal problems will attempt to stop blood leakage by using a laser in a process called photocoagulation. By using an appropriately selected laser, your ophthalmologist may seal the small blood vessels that can leak when a person has nonproliferative and proliferative retinopathy. More recently, ophthalmologists have been using injectable medic Continue reading >>

Can You Die From Diabetes? Type 1 And Type 2 Life Expectancy

Can You Die From Diabetes? Type 1 And Type 2 Life Expectancy

Diabetes is a disease which is caused either due to the lack of proper production of insulin by the pancreas or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body. This gives rise to the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body as it is the hormone insulin which is responsible for the breakdown of the carbohydrates and the other essential nutrients in the food to release the much-needed energy by the cells. It is a disease which adversely affects the primary function of metabolism in the body thereby exposing our body to several other complications. Diabetes affects different people in different manners and as such, it takes several forms. The most common type of diabetes is type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are various factors and causes which contribute to each type and form of the disease. Due to the several complications that are associated with this condition, diabetes is often considered a deadly disease that can kill you. It is not uncommon to hear of people who have died of diabetes in the past few years. In this article, we shall further deep dive into the various issues that diabetes accompanies and might lead to the death of the diabetic patient. How Long Can You Live with Diabetes? It is not very uncommon to hear that diabetes will shorten the expected life of the concerned patient. But the question is: How much? There are different opinions about the subject. As per a few types of research conducted, diabetes can shorten life by 8.5 years in a 50-year old individual. On the other hand, Diabetes UK estimates that the expected life span of type 1 diabetic patient is reduced by more than 20 years while a type 2 diabetes patient lives 10 years shorter as compared to the healthier counterparts. Besides, the University of Pittsburg has estimated throu Continue reading >>

My Sister Died Because She Didn't Take Diabetes Seriously

My Sister Died Because She Didn't Take Diabetes Seriously

When Yolanda Acuna Ocana was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, her family was almost relieved. She was 14 and had been suffering from inexplicable weight loss, constant thirst and tiredness, and they were grateful for a diagnosis. Now — sadly — they feel very differently about diabetes. Last April, aged just 39, Yolanda died as a result of the disease, leaving behind a loving husband and devoted family. ‘No one expects diabetes to kill someone so young in this day and age,’ says Yolanda’s sister, Nicky Dixon, 38, a company director from Surbiton, Surrey. People often think diabetes, type 1 or type 2, is not a serious condition, says Dr Jeremy Allgrove, a paediatric endocrinologist at Barts and the London NHS Trust. ‘But if you don’t look after yourself, it’s a killer.’ The figures are stark: type 1 diabetes reduces life expectancy on average by 20 years. The condition is caused by the body attacking the cells of the pancreas responsible for making insulin. Insulin helps the body break down glucose from food and turn it into energy; without it, blood sugar levels become dangerously high, causing damage to blood vessels. Around 300,000 Britons have the condition. It can run in families, but experts believe the condition is usually triggered, possibly by some sort of virus. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 is characterised by insulin dependence — once diagnosed, a patient must inject themselves daily for the rest of their life. The problem is that many people don’t take their insulin as they should, with potentially fatal consequences. Yolanda was supposed to inject herself seven times a day, but when she left home for university at 18, she reduced her intake because the jabs were causing her to put on weight. This growing trend has even been given a name Continue reading >>

What Does It Mean If I'm At Risk?

What Does It Mean If I'm At Risk?

Being told you are at risk of Type 2 diabetes can be confusing. The reasons people are at risk can be different and some people are more at risk than others. But, there are things everyone can do to make sure their risk of Type 2 diabetesis as low as possible. Finding out your risk is an important first step. You may have found out your risk of Type 2 diabetes from our online tool, or from a conversation with your GP. Now you know your risk, you can do something about it. If you don’t know your risk yet, find out using our free Know Your Risk online toolnow. If you found out your risk from your GP, find out more about talking to your GP about your risk. If you found out your risk using Know Your Risk, keep reading. Finding out your risk using our online tool What does your risk category mean? Your risk category explains your chances of getting Type 2 diabetes in the next 10 years, and can help you to see if there are changes you can make to reduce your risk. If you found out your risk on our Know Your Risk tool or at one of our events, here is a reminder of what your risk category means. Low or increased risk One in 20 people with low risk will get Type 2 diabetes in the next 10 years. One in 10 people with increased risk will get Type 2 diabetes in the next 10 years. It is important you're aware of your risk level, even if you are currently at low risk of Type 2 diabetes. Some of the risk factors you can do something about, and some you can’t. As you get older, or if your weight or waist size increases, your risk will increase. So even if you’re low or increased risk, make sure you’re maintaining a healthy weight, eating well and being active to keep your risk as low as possible, for as long as possible. Moderate or high risk One in seven people with moderate r Continue reading >>

Living Longer With Diabetes: Type 1

Living Longer With Diabetes: Type 1

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you may wonder, “Is this going to kill me? How long can I live with this?” These are scary questions. Fortunately, the answers have gotten better. This article is about living longer with Type 1. Next week will be about Type 2. History of life with Type 1 In Type 1, the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed. Before insulin was discovered and made injectable, Type 1 diabetes usually killed children within months, or even days. The only treatment known to medicine was going on a low-carb, high-fat and -protein diet. People might live a few years that way. According to the website Defeat Diabetes, “In 1897, the average life expectancy for a 10-year-old child with diabetes was about one year. Diagnosis at age 30 carried a life expectancy of about four years. A newly diagnosed 50-year-old might live eight more years.” (Probably, those 50-year-olds really had Type 2.) In the 1920s, insulin was discovered and became available for use. Life expectancy with Type 1 went up dramatically. But when I started nursing in the 1970s, it was still common for people with Type 1 to die before age 50. With better insulins, home testing, and lower-carbohydrate diets, people live longer. A study from the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, found that people with Type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years. This compares to a life expectancy at birth of roughly 76 years for men and 81 years for women in the general population in the U.S. A new study of about 25,000 people with Type 1 in Scotland found that men with Type 1 diabetes lose about 11 years of life expectancy, and women about 13 years compared to those without the disease. According to WebMD, “Heart disease accounted for the most lost Continue reading >>

Tatto Removal Before And After

Tatto Removal Before And After

About Us The Tattoo Vanish® Tattoo Removal Method and Product was developed in 2003 by our founder Mary Arnold-Ronish. With more than 30 years of experience as a registered nurse with heavy focus in the field of dermatology she was very knowledgeable dealing with skin health and various treatments. In 1993, she decided to apply her experience in dermatology into the field of permanent cosmetics and founded Professional Permanent Cosmetics, a truly professional permanent makeup practice in Las Vegas, Nevada. Her strict sterilization techniques and high quality work were immediately recognized, making her a respected member of the medical community and highly regarded as a true artist in permanent makeup. Why we are different? We apply a local anesthetic before and during the procedure using the tattoo machine in a similar manner as when the tattoo was received. Once the area has been exposed, we apply the Ink Eraser cream for a few minutes. The area is then wiped clean and bandaged. Below are the before and after pictures showing the phenomenal results of our natural Tattoo Vanish Method®. Note that results may vary depending on factors which include skin type and the ink used Our Testimonials Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And

Hypoglycemia And "insulin Shock"

Significantly, the most common problem diabetics experience today is not "high blood sugar" but "low blood sugar!" Diabetes medications are powerful but imprecise, and today's blood glucose testing cannot always guarantee you'll stay out of "too low." The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, completed in 1993, proved that the major diabetes complications: retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and diabetic heart disease, all follow elevated blood glucose. Diabetics who keep their numbers down cut the risk of complications. But in the rush to cut blood glucose, and keep it down, sometimes we fall too far. Why is immaterial: missed meals, improper medication dosage, departure from scheduling, abnormal exercise, consumption of alcohol, stress, or even "no reason in particular." Sometimes the numbers just drop too far. What happens next? A person going into a "low" can appear to be drunk. They can sweat, talk confused, become disoriented, stumble, lose their bearings, become aggressive, even "feisty," sometimes obscene, or pass out... But they're NOT drunk— and it is no fun they're having. The brain isn't getting the nourishment it needs, and the person can't function. Depending on severity, and depending on the individual, the person can be light-headed, unconscious, comatose... or dead. A hypoglycemic event is an emergency, and intervention is necessary. When You're Low: You have two lines of defense. One is your schedule. Know what your body needs, and keep to it! Take your medications on time, eat the right amount on time, and get the appropriate exercise—on time. The second line is your blood glucose monitor. The more you test, the better idea you have about where your sugars are. If your numbers are dropping dangerously, your monitor will reveal it. This means Continue reading >>

Diabetes Kills More Americans Than Thought

Diabetes Kills More Americans Than Thought

HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans who die from diabetes is much higher than previously believed, according to a new study. The research, based on federal government data, found that diabetes causes 12 percent of deaths in the United States. That makes it the third-leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer, researchers said. "Another way of saying that is, if diabetes were eliminated as a disease process, the number of deaths would decline by 12 percent," said study author Samuel Preston, a sociology professor at the University of Pennsylvania. "There has been only one similar, earlier research effort, and it was based on data from the 1980s and early '90s. It showed deaths attributable to diabetes amounted to roughly 4 percent of total deaths," he said in a university news release. Data for the new study came from the U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Both are conducted annually, which gives researchers more current figures. From this, the researchers found that Americans with diabetes have about a 90 percent higher death rate than those without diabetes. They noted that diabetes as the "underlying cause of death" had been significantly underreported in the United States. "There is only one underlying cause of death on a death certificate," Preston said. But, "diabetes is not listed as frequently as it is involved in the death of individuals." *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. Study co-author Andrew Stokes is a Continue reading >>

Do Carbs Cause Diabetes And Kill You?

Do Carbs Cause Diabetes And Kill You?

It just keeps coming. Even though science has never vilified a macro-nutrient as the direct cause of diabetes, some less than ethical individuals continue new approaches to get the public to move away from carbs, and toward fat. Why? you ask? Money. If you’re turned off by conspiracy talk, well … after reading this article, you won’t be able to come to a better conclusion than – money. They do call it “The Bottom Line”. We see empirical data that Low-fat diets don’t lead to diabetes, and studies show Low-fat diet’s seeming to reverse diabetes while consumption of carbs are high. But don’t low-CARB diets do the same? How can that be? Well of course if you remove carbs, blood sugar won’t be high. And these Low-carb guru’s hope you don’t learn any more than that. But humans are supposed to have blood sugar, and insulin is there to keep it at a certain level. They’re ignoring Nature We’re supposed to eat carbs. They’re in every natural food on Earth. Even the Inventor of the Glycemic index recommends veganism. Obesity, diabetes, etc, is mostly caused by putting carbs WITH fat in a diet, which nature doesn’t do with any food. Refined carbs are worse. The reason carbs and fat are both maligned AND defended is they’re bad TOGETHER! People with candida and diabetes who started a high-fruit low-fat diet, CURED it. The key is low-fat (according to experts like Neal Barnard, M.D. , and Dr Graham) The reason diabetes happens: Too much fat in the blood blocks insulin receptors from taking glucose out of the blood – leading to prolonged high levels of blood glucose, which prolongs insulin production. Because glucose can’t leave the bloodstream, the pancreas continues to create redundant insulin. Nature shouldn’t be maligned just because humans Continue reading >>

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