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How Can Diabetes Be Managed

Can Turmeric Help Manage Diabetes? What The Evidence Says

Can Turmeric Help Manage Diabetes? What The Evidence Says

Turmeric has been used for centuries in both food and medicine. The spice is believed to have many potential benefits for the human body. But could turmeric be a new tool to help manage diabetes? Turmeric is the common name for the root Curcuma longa. It is a bright yellow-orange spice that is a staple in traditional food dishes from many Asian countries. In this article we explore the role of turmeric in alternative and Western medicine. We go on to analyze the potential benefits of the spice for diabetes management. Turmeric and medicine Turmeric plays an important role in medical practices, such as Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Medical science is interested in the herb, as well, due to the high levels of friendly compounds it contains. Of particular interest is a class of compounds called curcuminoids. One curcuminoid found in turmeric is curcumin. This name is sometimes loosely used to describe all of the curcuminoids in turmeric. Turmeric and curcumin are being studied for a number of human conditions such as: inflammatory bowel disease h. pylori infections Turmeric is also often added to the diet to help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress. Can turmeric help people with diabetes? Including turmeric in the diet seems to promote general wellbeing. There is also evidence that indicates turmeric may be especially beneficial for people with diabetes. It is believed that curcumin is the source of many of the medical benefits of turmeric. The focus of most research has been on curcumin itself, rather than whole turmeric. A review in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine compiled more than 13 years of research on the connection between diabetes and curcumin. The result suggests curcumin can help people with diabetes in d Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Be Managed? Useful Tips And Information

How Can Diabetes Be Managed? Useful Tips And Information

How is Diabetes Managed? Prior to the discovery of insulin in 1921, everybody with type 1 diabetes died within a few years after medical diagnosis. Although insulin is not considered a remedy, its discovery was the very first major advancement in diabetes treatment. Today, healthy consuming, physical activity, and taking insulin are the standard treatments for type 1 diabetes. The quantity of insulin should be balanced with food intake and day-to-day activities. Blood glucose levels should be carefully kept track of through frequent blood sugar checking. People with diabetes also monitor blood sugar levels a number of times a year with a laboratory test called the A1C. Results of the A1C test reflect typical blood glucose over a 2- to 3-month period. Healthy eating, exercise, and blood sugar testing are the fundamental management tools for type 2 diabetes. In addition, lots of people with type 2 diabetes need oral medication, insulin, or both to control their blood sugar levels. Grownups with diabetes are at high threat for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In fact, a minimum of 65 percent of those with diabetes pass away from cardiovascular disease or stroke. Managing diabetes is more than keeping blood glucose levels under control– it is likewise crucial to manage high blood pressure and cholesterol levels through healthy eating, exercise, and use of medications (if required). By doing so, those with diabetes can reduce their danger. Aspirin therapy, if advised by the healthcare group, and smoking cigarettes cessation can also assist lower risk. Individuals with diabetes should take duty for their daily care. Much of the daily care involves keeping blood sugar levels from going too low or too high. When blood glucose levels drop too low– a condition referred to as hyp Continue reading >>

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

It's no secret that type 2 diabetes is on the rise in the United States and around the world. But if you've been diagnosed with diabetes, there's a lot you can do to improve your health — and the best place to start is likely by making some changes to your lifestyle. “Basic principles of good health like eating right, exercising regularly, and maintaining a healthy weight can be as effective as medicine in the management of type 2 diabetes for most people,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, lead medical nutrition therapist at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha. That's backed up by the Look AHEAD study, a large clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The researchers found that over a four-year period, changes like eating a healthier diet and getting more exercise led to weight loss and improved diabetes control in 5,000 overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes. A December 2016 review in Diabetologia similarly found through 28 studies that participants who were able to achieve about 150 minutes per week of moderate activity lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by 26 percent compared with nonactive participants. If you're ready to make positive changes to help control diabetes, here's how to get started. Improve Your Diet to Help You Treat Type 2 Diabetes Naturally Keeping close tabs on your diet is a major way to help manage type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet for people with type 2 diabetes includes fresh or frozen fruit and vegetables, whole grains, beans, lean meats, and low-fat or fat-free dairy. Focus on eating fruit and non-starchy vegetables, like broccoli, carrots, and lettuce, and having smaller portions of starchy foods, meats, and dairy products. Be especially careful about loading Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In People With Dementia

Managing Diabetes In People With Dementia

The number of patients with both type 2 diabetes and dementia is rising, which poses new challenges in blood glucose monitoring and medicines administration. Continue reading >>

Can I Treat Diabetes Without Drugs?

Can I Treat Diabetes Without Drugs?

If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take daily insulin injections to keep your blood glucose in a normal range. Your body produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a vital hormone that helps your body convert food into energy. Without insulin, you would die. If you have type 2 diabetes, the answer to this question is much less clear. Many people can keep their blood glucose in a healthy range without medications (either oral diabetes medications or insulin injections) if they lose weight and keep their weight down, are regularly physically active, and follow a meal plan that helps them keep portion sizes under control and helps them spread the amount of carbohydrate they eat at each meal throughout the day. Eventually, however, many people with type 2 diabetes find that despite their best efforts, weight control, exercise and diet aren't enough to keep their blood glucose in a healthy range. This is not unusual. One theory is that some people's insulin-producing cells just get tired out from having to produce more and more insulin because their cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. If your healthcare team tells you that you need to take oral diabetes medications or insulin injections to manage your blood glucose, it's important that you follow their instructions. Keeping your blood glucose in a healthy range is key to preventing long-term complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks, and other problems that poorly controlled blood glucose can cause over a period of years. Continue reading >>

As I Am A Type 1 Diabetic, How Can I Manage To Travel To Abroad And Get The Same Insulin There?

As I Am A Type 1 Diabetic, How Can I Manage To Travel To Abroad And Get The Same Insulin There?

Based on my experience, this is what you can do to prepare: Carry enough insulin and syringes/pens with you. This is the best approach and works well for short trips. Insulin does not need refrigeration for 30 days. That should not be a concern. If you plan to stay longer than a month, better to meet an endocrinologist and get a new prescription. In case you carry insulin with you on a flight, carry it in cabin baggage. Also, keep your prescription handy. Some airport security personnel may want to see it. Carry your prescription with you. In most countries, pharmacies will not let you buy insulin without a prescription. I have always carried my insulin with me. So, I am not aware if prescriptions from non-local doctors are even considered valid. The insulin that you use in your country may not be available in other countries, or may be sold under a different brand name in other countries. To avoid running into such issues, it is better to carry enough insulin for short trips; and to visit a local doctor and get a local prescription for longer trips. Insulin vials and syringes (if you use syringes) are sold in 2 variants - U100 and U40. Using a U40 syringe to take insulin from a U100 vial will lead to an incorrect dosage. The same may be applicable to insulin vials and pens too - I don’t have much experience using pens though. In case you have to use a U40 syringe with U100 insulin, search online to figure out how to take the correct dosage. Also, take less insulin to be on safe side and avoid hypos. Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2

Managing Type 2

In type 2 diabetes, your pancreas is still working but not as effectively as it needs to. This means your body is building insulin resistance and is unable to effectively convert glucose into energy leaving too much glucose in the blood. Type 2 diabetes can sometimes initially be managed through lifestyle modification including a healthy diet, regular exercise and monitoring your blood glucose levels. Eating well helps manage your blood glucose levels and your body weight Exercising helps the insulin work more effectively, lowers your blood pressure and reduces the risk of heart disease. Regular blood glucose monitoring tests whether the treatment being followed is adequately controlling blood glucose levels or whether you need to adjust your treatment. The aim of diabetes management is to keep blood glucose levels as close to the target range between 4 to 6 mmol/L (fasting), this will help prevent both short-term and long-term complications. Your healthcare team including your doctor, specialist, dietician and Credential Diabetes Educator, can help you with blood glucose monitoring, healthy eating and physical activity. However, sometimes healthy eating and exercise is not enough to keep the blood glucose levels down. Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition. As time progresses, the insulin becomes more resistant and the pancreas is less effective converting glucose into energy. To help the pancreas convert glucose into energy, people with type 2 diabetes are often prescribed tablets to control their blood glucose levels. Eventually it may be necessary to start taking insulin to control blood glucose levels. This is when your body is no longer producing enough insulin of its own. Sometimes tablets may be continued in addition to insulin. If you require medication as Continue reading >>

Preventing And Managing Diabetes Complications

Preventing And Managing Diabetes Complications

Fast Facts There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, when the body does not make insulin and people need to take insulin every day to live; type 2, the most common type of diabetes, in which the body does not make or use insulin well (people with type 2 may need to take pills or insulin to manage their diabetes) and gestational diabetes, diagnosed in some women during pregnancy. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born, but even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting type 2 diabetes later in life. Diabetes can lead to problems with the heart, kidneys, eyes, skin, legs and feet, nerves, and teeth and gums. Good management can cut this risk in half. 23.6 million Americans have diabetes—7.8 percent of the U.S. population. Nearly 1 in 4 of those don't know they have it. About 79 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. This is a condition where blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Prediabetes puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but you can lower this risk. People with diabetes have seen greater success in managing the complications of their disease. Between 1997 and 2006, death rates for people with diabetes dropped substantially, especially deaths related to heart disease and stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and NIH researchers. Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, is too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to provide energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, this can cause problems with your heart, kidneys, Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes During Illness

How To Manage Diabetes During Illness

Battling a cold, getting over an injury or undergoing surgery is no fun for anyone. For people with diabetes, managing blood sugar is an extra concern. The stress of illness or injury can cause blood sugar to rise and make insulin less effective. This can lead to serious problems, including diabetic coma. That’s why it’s important to know what to do when illness strikes. Manage medicine When you’re sick, your blood sugar can be high even if you’re not eating much. So it’s especially important to take your diabetes medicine on time. You might need extra medicine. If you take diabetes pills, you may also need to take insulin until you’ve recovered. And if you already take insulin, you may need more than usual. Monitoring glucose When you’re ill, check your blood glucose often. Have someone help you if you can’t do it yourself. You may need to check ketones, too. Record the results in case you need to report them to your healthcare provider. Food and fluids Try to follow your diabetes meal plan. Drink plenty of calorie-free fluids, especially water. These fluids help rid your body of extra glucose and prevent dehydration. If you can’t eat or keep down enough solid food, you may need to have some soup or drink beverages that contain sugar, such as apple juice. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions about your food and beverage intake. Be prepared The best way to cope with illness is to develop a sick-day plan before you get sick. Work with your diabetes care team to find out what type of diabetes medicine to take while sick and how much you will need. Ask how often you should check blood glucose and ketones. Check with your healthcare provider about over-the-counter, sugar-free cold medicines that are safe for you to take. Also list alterna Continue reading >>

After Diabetes Diagnosis

After Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes is a disease where blood sugar levels are too high because the body can no longer make or use insulin properly. The condition could lead to serious complications and even death. An estimated 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes in the U.S. There are several types of diabetes, including Type 1, Type 2 and gestational — a type that occurs in pregnant women. Type 2 is the most common, and about 95 percent of all people with diabetes in the U.S. have this type. An additional 86 million adults in the United States have prediabetes, a condition where your blood sugar is high but not elevated enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Cases of diabetes increase each year, and every 19 seconds doctors diagnose someone in the U.S. with the disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 3 adults may be diagnosed with diabetes by 2050. It’s important to keep blood sugar levels controlled because it can cause serious health problems — including kidney disease, heart problems, skin problems and limb amputations. Even if Type 2 diabetes has no cure, it can be prevented and managed. People with the disease can control blood sugar with lifestyle changes and medication. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which your body loses its ability to produce and use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that the body uses to convert glucose into energy. Without the right amount of insulin, excess sugar builds up in the body and causes a number of health problems. Where Type 1 typically occurs in younger people and is an immune disorder, Type 2 most often occurs later in life. In fact, the medical community used to call Type 2 diabetes “adult-onset” diabetes. M Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Curable?

Is Diabetes Curable?

Caveat: I am neither a doctor nor a nutrition expert. However, I do have type 2 diabetes. I was diagnosed in August 2015 after several years of deep denial and ignoring my escalating A1C levels. My personal experience with diabetes is that with significant lifestyle changes, I have been able to manage it. But I know that if I were to stop exercising and go back to the way I used to eat, my blood sugar would go up and my health would surely deteriorate. On the day I was diagnosed, I cried for about three hours. Then I dried my tears and started doing research. I found a great TEDx talk by Dr. Sarah Hallberg on YouTube. Her message was very simple: Food is made up of protein, fats and carbohydrates. Protein raises blood sugar some. Fats don't raise it at all. Carbohydrates raise it a lot, every time you eat them. So if you eat fewer carbohydrates and more fats, your blood sugar won't go up as much. If your blood sugar doesn't go up, your diabetes is controlled. It made perfect sense to me. That day I decided to change my diet and eliminated grains, starchy vegetables, legumes, sugar, and fruit. I ate protein, non-starchy vegetables, and fat - a lot of fat. I hadn’t heard the terms “keto” or “ketogenic diet” at that point, but that’s basically what I’ve been following. Extremely low carbohydrate, moderate protein, high fat. Within three months, my A1C was down into high-normal territory. Three months after that, it was normal. And it's been coming down ever since. I lost 40+ pounds, but weight loss was never my goal. I just don’t want to suffer the long-term negative health consequences of uncontrolled diabetes. I’ve written about my battle with diabetes on my blog. Here’s a recent post: I cut out sugar and carbs to treat my type 2 diabetes, and here's Continue reading >>

How Do You Cure Type 2 Diabetes Naturally With Diet?

How Do You Cure Type 2 Diabetes Naturally With Diet?

I’m a specialist practitioner in obesity and diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can be reversed through diet. Absolutely. Firstly this is what is a normal insulin reaction looks like: Insulin is manufactured in the pancreas and secreted when your blood sugar levels rise. Blood sugar needs to be not too high and not too low. Insulin’s mechanism to remove sugar from blood is to put it into cells, like your muscles. If there is an excess after blood glucose has gone into cells it is then put in the liver and further excess becomes fat. What happens with type 2 When insulin is secreted the body’s cells have ‘‘receptors’ that accept the insulin’s key that then open the doors to the cell to let the glucose in. Sadly in type 2 the receptors become resistant to the insulin key. Therefore not enough energy gets into the cell. The body has a negative feedback system. Once the cells do not get enough energy a signal is sent back to the pancreas to manufacture even more insulin. This is a vicious cycle. Insulin keeps going up and resistance keeps getting worse. A drug, called metformin works by making cells receptive again but it has limitations and eventually other drugs are needed. This is not ideal; so how can we reverse this? Well quite simply really. The crux of this scenario is that it is the sugar spikes in the blood that are causing the high levels of insulin in the first place. Certain foods cause insulin to enter the system in a fast and high volume way and some foods hardly disturb insulin at all. The insulin index is similar to the GI system and by picking foods that cause little insulin response the type 2 diabetes begins to reverse. This is a snapshot. The lower the number the lower the insulin response Sadly many government guidelines are not beneficial and larg Continue reading >>

5 Tips To Get Your Diabetes Under Control

5 Tips To Get Your Diabetes Under Control

Controlling your diabetes is a daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly challenge, but the effort is worth it. Right away you'll feel better and have more energy.The payoff? You'll live better longer with less risk of problems from diabetes like heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, even blindness. The key to managing your diabetes is to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. It sounds tough, but there are simple steps you can follow. Spot Check Your Sugar You and your doctor will have set a schedule to test your blood sugar. Add an extra check on top. Maybe at breakfast one day, lunch the next, and so on. It's like popping in unannounced. "If you're a supervisor and your workers know that you're only going to come once a day to check on them, chances are they're going to be well-behaved during that particular time and the rest of the day you're going to be doing other things," says Sethu Reddy, MD, chief of the adult diabetes section at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. "If you spot check, you have a much better sense of how things are going." Use that information to adjust your eating and exercise to gain even better control if you need to. Count Carbs They can quickly send your blood sugar on a roller-coaster ride. That's why it's so important to keep track. Most women need 35-45 grams of carbs per meal while guys need 45-60 grams, says Jessica Crandall, a dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. A cup of rice or pasta is about 45 grams. To make the most of them, pair your carbs with a protein, like nuts. Opt for high-fiber carbs. Both will slow digestion so you feel full without raising blood sugar. "Fiber is really important for blood-sugar control, but it's also a Roto-Rooter to clear out cholesterol building in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

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