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How Bad Is Type 3 Diabetes

Alzheimer’s = Type 3 Diabetes

Alzheimer’s = Type 3 Diabetes

“My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease, and I am worried about getting it too.” writes this week’s house call. “What can we do to prevent dementia?” The truth is, dementia is a very big problem that’s becoming bigger every day. Statistics are grim. 10 percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds, and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And the fastest growing segment of our population is the 85-year-olds. Researchers predict Alzheimer’s will affect 106 million people by 2050. It’s now the seventh leading cause of death. Scientists now call Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 diabetes.” What’s the link between Alzheimer’s and diabetes? Well, new research shows insulin resistance, or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. But don’t think too much insulin affects only older folks’ memories. It doesn’t just suddenly occur once you’re older. Dementia actually begins when you’re younger and takes decades to develop and worsen. Here’s the bad news/good news. Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). You Continue reading >>

Alzheimer’s :: Is It Really Type 3 Diabetes?

Alzheimer’s :: Is It Really Type 3 Diabetes?

Alzheimer’s and diabetes: What’s the link? Is there even a link? You may have heard that Alzheimer’s Disease is recently being touted as “type 3 diabetes.” In fact, this link was first suggested way back in 1989, but is just starting to get traction and buzz now. So, I wanted to find out, is it just sensational headlines? Or is there some actual science behind it? Specifically, I wanted to dig into the research to give you the goods on whether Alzheimer’s represents the evolution of diabetes to that of a brain disease: “type 3 diabetes.” But, before we dive into the concept of “type 3” diabetes, let’s get a super-quick primer on blood sugar regulation, and types 1 and 2 diabetes. BLOOD SUGAR REGULATION 101 Your body needs to regulate so many aspects of your blood for optimal health. Blood sugar level is just one of them. When blood sugar levels get too low or too high for too long, you can end up with diabetes. When you eat or drink your blood sugar goes up. This is your digestive system doing its job to absorb nutrients from your food. And this is normal and healthy. FUN FACTOID: Blood sugar increases are mostly from eating carbs, and fats/proteins can reduce blood sugar increases caused by carbs. So eat some healthy fat or protein with carbs! When your blood sugar level increases, your body takes that sugar from your blood to use it as energy in your cells or store it for later use. It does this with the hormone “insulin.” When your blood sugar level increases, your body takes that sugar from your blood to use it as energy in your cells or store it for later use. It does this with the hormone “insulin.” Insulin tells your cells to take the sugar out of your blood. This system can go wrong in a few different ways. Enter diabetes... DIABETE Continue reading >>

Sugar And Your Brain: Is Alzheimer’s Disease Actually Type 3 Diabetes?

Sugar And Your Brain: Is Alzheimer’s Disease Actually Type 3 Diabetes?

Last month I said goodbye to my 88-year-old Granddad Maurie, who finally lost his battle with dementia. The last few years have been a massive learning curve for my grandmother and our family around how to deal with someone suffering from any sort of dementia. Unfortunately there is little we could do except support him once the disease set in. Granddad at my wedding 3 years ago Today, over 46 million people live with dementia worldwide, more than the current population of Spain. According to the World Dementia Report 2015, this number is estimated to increase to 131.5 million by 2050. Our current healthcare system is already struggling to deal with lifestyle diseases such as cancer and heart disease, but dementia costs exponentially more. The higher costs are associated with dementia patients generally living longer with no remission and needing more assistance. Personally this experience has inspired me to learn more about the disease and what can be done to decrease the chances of the same fate for myself and others. The overwhelming answer that came back from the research was the connection with brain disease and sugar. Dementia (of which Alzheimer’s is one type) starves your brain, tangles and twists vital cells, and for decades it has been misrepresented as an untreatable, genetically determined disease. Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in North America. The truth, however, is that this devastating illness shares a strong link with another sickness that wreaks havoc on many — Diabetes. We all know that individuals affected by Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes have a notable resistance to insulin. Type 1 is caused by the body’s inability to produce insulin, and Type 2 is caused by the deterioration of the body’s insulin receptors and associa Continue reading >>

What Is Type 3 Diabetes?

What Is Type 3 Diabetes?

At first blush, it may be hard to imagine a connection between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. But it’s real—and it’s so strong that some experts are now referring to it as type 3 diabetes or brain diabetes. By any name, it’s the progression from type 2 diabetes to Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia marked by memory deficits and a dramatic decline in cognitive function. While all people with diabetes have a 60 percent increased risk of developing any type of dementia, including Alzheimer’s, recent research suggests that women with type 2 diabetes have a 19 percent greater risk of a certain type, known as vascular dementia (which is caused by problems with blood supply to the brain) than men do. Overall, older adults with type 2 diabetes suffer from greater declines in working memory and executive functioning (a set of mental processes that involve planning, organization, controlling attention, and flexible thinking) than their peers do. Granted, not everyone who has type 2 diabetes will develop Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, or any other form of dementia, and there are many people who have Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia who don’t have diabetes, notes Gary Small, M.D., a professor of psychiatry at the UCLA Semel Institute and author of The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program. But the reality is, “these risk factors tend to add up: If you have diabetes, that doubles the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. If you have a first-degree relative—a parent or sibling, for example—with Alzheimer’s, that doubles your risk.” And if you have poorly controlled blood pressure, abdominal (a.k.a., central) obesity, or sleep apnea, your risk of developing dementia is increased even more. Surprisin Continue reading >>

What Is Type 3 Diabetes ?

What Is Type 3 Diabetes ?

It was found that the brain produces insulin. Yes, the brain really produces insulin. This brain insulin is not affected by the level of glucose in the blood as in type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. However with type3 diabetes the brain produces lower than normal levels of brain insulin. If the brain cells are deprived of insulin they eventually die causing memory loss and other degenerative diseases. This new type of diabetes also strengthens scientists’ belief that people with diabetes have an increased risk of suffering from Alzheimer’s disease by up to 65%. Alzheimer is a degenerative brain disorder. Discovered by Dr Suzanne de la Monte You are about to leave ResearchGate. Click to proceed to: Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the problem of high levels of blood sugar. The inability to control blood sugar causes the symptoms and the complications of both types of diabetes. But type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are two different diseases in many ways. According to the latest (2014) estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects just 5 percent of those adults, with type 2 diabetes affecting up to 95 percent. Here’s what else you need to know to be health-savvy in the age of the diabetes epidemic. What Causes Diabetes? "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease — the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin," a hormone, says Andjela Drincic, MD, associate professor of internal medicine in the division of diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The exact cause is not known, but it's probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active. "The cause of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial," says Dr. Drincic. "People inherit genes that make them susceptible to type 2, but lifestyle factors, like obesity and inactivity, are also important. In type 2 diabetes, at least in the early stages, there is enough insulin, but the body becomes resistant to it." Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of the disease, a poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle, and obesity. African-Americans, Latin Americans, and certain Native American groups have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans. Juvenile or Adult-Onset: When Does Diabetes Start? Usually, type 1 diabetes in dia Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes: Natural Treatments That Work

Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes: Natural Treatments That Work

The human body is an exceptionally delicate mechanism. All of its parts are beautifully interconnected, and even the tiniest of details is crucial for the big picture. For example, a single cell can either kill (like during cancer) or save (like during immune responses to infections) you through a series of complex processes. And, in turn, these processes are also intertwined. One change leads to another. One condition always brings forth something else. This truth often results in unbelievable findings that shake the scientific world to its very core, and here you will discover one of such breakthrough. A discovery that may change forever the way we see some of the most dreadful conditions of the modern era: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Let’s take a look at the numbers and trends, as they are the best way to illustrate what’s happening. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the global prevalence of obesity has more than doubled since 1980. In 2014 more than 1.9 billion adults had excess weight, and 600 million of them were obese. And don’t get me wrong, this is not a matter of looks, but strictly of health. Innocent (often even cute) at first sight, excess weight takes a terrible toll on the body. It increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases (heart attack and stroke in particular) and certain forms of cancer, but what’s even more important in the light of our discussion today is that, untreated excess weight almost inevitably results in diabetes. Throughout the last decades, the global prevalence of diabetes in men has increased more than twofold (from 4.3% in 1980 to 9.0% in 2014), and the same tendency in women isn’t much better (from 5.0% in 1980 to 7.9% in 2014). Of course, some countries do a better job in preventing the condi Continue reading >>

Is Alzheimer’s Disease

Is Alzheimer’s Disease

Insulin Mimetics for Brain Support a Type of Diabetes? Proof that the brain produces insulin sheds new and provocative light on a complex question By Will Block any people believe that good things come in threes: a three-ring circus, the Three Stooges, the three branches of government, etc. Perhaps our special affinity for the number three comes from the fact that space has three dimensions, or that Christian faith centers on the Trinity. Whatever the reason, the other side of the coin (uh-oh, only two sides!) is that many people also believe that bad things come in threes, such as the three branches of government, three strikes and you’re out, and the “fact” (baloney!) that the deaths of prominent people tend to come in threes. The truth is that most things, good or bad, come in arbitrary numbers that have no bearing on our cultural biases. Take diabetes mellitus, for instance. There’s type 1 diabetes, a severe, chronic disease that strikes in childhood or adolescence, and there’s type 2 diabetes, a milder (but ultimately terribly destructive) form of the disease that typically develops in adulthood. These two diseases are quite different in nature, even though both are disorders of glucose (blood sugar) metabolism that result in hyperglycemia, or excessively high glucose levels. (For more on these diseases, see the sidebar “The Types of Diabetes.”) The Types of Diabetes The common denominator in the two types of diabetes mellitus is chronically high blood glucose levels due to a malfunction in the body’s production or use of insulin, the hormone that regulates glucose levels by facilitating the transport of glucose molecules from the bloodstream into our cells. (Although that is the role for which insulin is best known, it also has several other roles Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Disease (stages 1-4)

Diabetes And Kidney Disease (stages 1-4)

What is diabetes? Diabetes happens when your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone. It controls how much sugar is in your blood. A high level of sugar in your blood can cause problems in many parts of your body, including your heart, kidneys, eyes, and brain. Over time, this can lead to kidney disease and kidney failure. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes generally begins when people are young. In this case, the body does not make enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes is usually found in adults over 40, but is becoming more common in younger people. It is usually associated with being overweight and tends to run in families. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin, but cannot use it well. What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Your kidneys are important because they keep the rest of your body in balance. They: Remove waste products from the body Balance the body’s fluids Help keep blood pressure under control Keep bones healthy Help make red blood cells. When you have kidney disease, it means that the kidneys have been damaged. Kidneys can get damaged from a disease like diabetes. Once your kidneys are damaged, they cannot filter your blood nor do other jobs as well as they should. When diabetes is not well controlled, the sugar level in your blood goes up. This is called hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can cause damage to many parts of your body, especially the kidneys, heart, blood vessels, eyes, feet, nerves. Diabetes can harm the kidneys by causing damage to: Blood vessels inside your kidneys. The filtering units of the kidney are filled with tiny blood vessels. Over time, high sugar levels in the blood can cause these vessels to become narrow and clogged. Without enough blood, the kid Continue reading >>

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. Most people with the condition have type 2. There are about 27 million people in the U.S. with it. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood glucose is not normal, but not high enough to be diabetes yet. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. It's what lets your cells turn glucose from the food you eat into energy. People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their cells don't use it as well as they should. Doctors call this insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to try to get glucose into the cells. But eventually it can't keep up, and the sugar builds up in your blood instead. Usually a combination of things cause type 2 diabetes, including: Genes. Scientists have found different bits of DNA that affect how your body makes insulin. Extra weight. Being overweight or obese can cause insulin resistance, especially if you carry your extra pounds around the middle. Now type 2 diabetes affects kids and teens as well as adults, mainly because of childhood obesity. Metabolic syndrome. People with insulin resistance often have a group of conditions including high blood glucose, extra fat around the waist, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Too much glucose from your liver. When your blood sugar is low, your liver makes and sends out glucose. After you eat, your blood sugar goes up, and usually the liver will slow down and store its glucose for later. But some people's livers don't. They keep cranking out sugar. Bad communication between cells. Sometimes cells send the wrong signals or don't pick up messages correctly. When these problems affect how your cells make and use insulin or glucose, a chain reac Continue reading >>

Why Alzheimer's Disease Is Called Type 3 Diabetes

Why Alzheimer's Disease Is Called Type 3 Diabetes

Alzheimer's disease is a type of progressive dementia that affects more than 5 million Americans, and those rates are projected to increase dramatically over the next several years. One link to Alzheimer's disease that researchers are exploring is diabetes. There have been several studies that have connected the two diseases together. In fact, some researchers have begun to call Alzheimer's disease "type 3 diabetes." Although a small amount of research found an increased risk of dementia with type 1 diabetes, the vast majority of studies have concluded that this link between diabetes and Alzheimer's is specific to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes develops when insulin becomes less efficient at processing sugar through the bloodstream. Studies show that approximately half of people with type 2 diabetes will go on to develop Alzheimer's disease. With such a strong connection, the focus of some research studies is to explain the connection between the two disease. Type 3 Diabetes In type 1 or 2 diabetes, not enough insulin (or none at all) is produced to process glucose (sugar) correctly or the body no longer responds to insulin, and it affects the functioning on the whole body. In Alzheimer's disease, it appears that a similar problem is occurring, but instead of causing problems in the entire body's functioning, the effects occur in the brain. Researchers found interesting evidence of this when they studied people's brains after their death. They noted that the brains of those with Alzheimer's disease who did not have type 1 or type 2 diabetes showed many of the same abnormalities of those with diabetes, including reduced levels of insulin in the brain. This led researchers to conclude that perhaps Alzheimer's is a brain-specific type of diabetes which they termed "type Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes: Cross Talk Between Differentially Regulated Proteins Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Alzheimer’s Disease

Type 3 Diabetes: Cross Talk Between Differentially Regulated Proteins Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Alzheimer’s Disease

Type 3 Diabetes (T3D) is a neuroendocrine disorder that represents the progression of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). T3D contributes in the increase of the total load of Alzheimer’s patients worldwide. The protein network based strategies were used for the analysis of protein interactions and hypothesis was derived describing the possible routes of communications among proteins. The hypothesis provides the insight on the probable mechanism of the disease progression for T3D. The current study also suggests that insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) could be the major player which holds the capacity to shift T2DM to T3D by altering metabolic pathways like regulation of beta-cell development, negative regulation of PI3K/AKT pathways and amyloid beta degradation. Insulin signaling pathways are conserved in various types of cells and tissues. It regulates the energy metabolism, homeostasis and reproduction in living system. It reaches the brain via cerebral spinal fluid and transporters present at the blood brain barrier. It is proposed to enhance cognitive abilities via activation of insulin receptors in the hippocampal region of brain. It stimulates translocation of GLUT4 to hippocampal plasma membranes thereby enhancing the glucose uptake in the time dependent manner1. Glucose utilization during neuronal activity is similar in both peripheral tissue and hippocampal region1. Scientists have worked extensively to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the production and secretion of insulin in the brain and pancreas2. Their findings suggest that both beta cells and neurons respond to glucose and hormonal stimuli by depolarization of ATP sensitive potassium channels in similar fashion. Few studies report that insulin was stored in synapti Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 3 Diabetes Symptoms

Why is Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) sometimes called “Type 3 diabetes?” What are the symptoms, and how can it be prevented? Alzheimer’s is a progressive brain disease. People who have this condition gradually lose memory and mental focus. They may have emotional and behavioral changes that put a great load on their families. The course of Alzheimer’s disease varies dramatically. Some people become severely disabled and die from it. Others may experience only a mild slowing of brain function. What causes Type 3 diabetes? How might diabetes cause Alzheimer’s symptoms? Gary Small, MD, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA and author of The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program said that high blood sugars cause inflammation throughout the body and brain. Chronic inflammation has been linked with two brain changes typical of Alzheimer’s disease. In Alzheimer’s, clumps of protein called beta-amyloid plaques form between the brain cells and may block communication. Researchers have discovered that many people with Type 2 diabetes have beta-amyloid deposits in their pancreas like the ones found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. Tau tangles are twisted-up proteins that form within nerve cells of people with Alzheimer’s, interfering with cell function. We don’t know what causes this nerve damage, but studies done at Brown University and the University of Pennsylvania indicate that insulin resistance, the core of Type 2 diabetes, is a big part of it. Insulin resistance may deprive brain cells of glucose they need to function, causing damage. On Verywell.com, health writer Esther Heerema, MSW, said, “The brains of those with Alzheimer’s disease who did not have diabetes showed many of the same abnormal Continue reading >>

I Have Type 3c Diabetes – What Is That All About?

I Have Type 3c Diabetes – What Is That All About?

This week is #NationalDiabetesWeek and social media has been full of interesting facts and hints and tips on how to manage either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. What I have noticed though is that no-one has, thus far, mentioned Type 3 diabetes. This hasn’t come as a surprise. A year before I was diagnosed with operable pancreatic cancer, I was told that I may have Type 2 diabetes. However, I wasn’t overweight, nor did I have a family history of the disease. We now know that it was probably the cancer causing the blood sugar level elevations and this link between new-onset diabetes without weight gain (which can occur 1-3 years before a pancreatic cancer diagnosis) is something that we at Pancreatic Cancer Action are investigating in our research programmes. For all of these years (nearly 9) I have believed that I have Type 2 diabetes. However, at a recent consultation with my new Diabetologist, I discovered that I have in fact got Type 3c Diabetes. This I had never heard of before and so went about trying to find out more. I looked at some informed websites including Diabetes UK and found nothing. Not even a mention. And not all of the medical profession has heard of this type of diabetes either – unless they are specialists in this field. Never being one to give up, I kept on researching. I have since found out that, of all diabetes cases Type 3c makes up about 8%1 – not a lot, but not insignificant either. Type 3c Diabetes is usually characterised by the fact that the patient has had all or part of their pancreas resected due to cancer or cystic lesions or other diseases of the pancreas such as pancreatitis and cystic fybrosis.2 Patients often have Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency (malabsorption) and are on Pancreatic Enzyme Therapy (PERT) to help them get their Continue reading >>

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