diabetestalk.net

How Are People Diagnosed With Diabetes?

Health: Health Issue/cause Of Death From Which Famous People Are Suffered/suffering And Their Best Quotation?

Health: Health Issue/cause Of Death From Which Famous People Are Suffered/suffering And Their Best Quotation?

Insomnia, liver and kidney diseases, malaria, migraine, diabetes and heart ailments as some of the 31 health problems. ANY TYPE OF HEALTH ISSUE/CAUSE OF DEATH/INJURY/ETC.... ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM- HEART FAILURE, CORONARY THROMBOSIS DIABETES MELLITUS TENNIS ELBOW INJURY MYASTHENIA GRAVIS & TB(2000) AMYOTROHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS Muhammad Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson's in 1984 at the age of 42 HEAR FAILURE HEART FAILURE, REACTIVE ARTHRITIS SYPHILIS, HEART ATTACK, STROKE Trigeminal Neuralgia Chronic subdural hematoma CARDIAC ARREST BACK INJURY (2010) In 2003, Larry Page, was diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis Three sportsmen who fought and beat Cancer Yuvraj Singh "Beating cancer is personal battle. It was one of the toughest opponents I have faced so far, and I think I did reasonably well. Touch wood." "Cancer doesn’t mean that you’re going to die." "When I was taking chemotherapy, there were a lot of elderly patients, and that would inspire me. I thought, 'If they can be cured, why can't I be?" Lance Armstrong "Before Cancer, I Just Lived. Now I Live Strong." “I want all of you to know that I intend to beat this disease. And further, I intend to ride again as a professional cyclist.” “Pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it lasts forever. That surrender, even the smallest act of giving up, stays with me. So when I feel like quitting, I ask myself, which would I rather live with?” “Giving up was never an option” ‎"Make an obstacle an opportunity, make a negative a positive.” Eric Abidal "Rocks on the Road? Store them all One day you will Build a Castle" "We certainly all have a mission on Earth. Mine is to save peopl Continue reading >>

There Is A Third Type Of Diabetes: Experts Warn People With Type 3c Are Being Misdiagnosed And That Is Why They Aren’t Recovering

There Is A Third Type Of Diabetes: Experts Warn People With Type 3c Are Being Misdiagnosed And That Is Why They Aren’t Recovering

People are at risk for developing severe problems with their pancreas after being misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes, a study claims. Type 3c diabetes occurs as a result of pancreatic inflammation, abnormal growth of tissue on the organ or surgically removing part or all of the tissue, which affects the body's ability to produce insulin. The study claims that people who previously had a pancreatic disease could've been misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes, which can cause the wrong treatment plan. Researchers said the National Health Service and health experts need to distinguish between the types of diabetes to avoid providing the wrong care to a patient. Scroll down for video Experts from the University of Surrey examined the patient medical records of more than two million Britons to assess the frequency of different types of diabetes and the accuracy of diagnosis. The study, published in the journals Diabetes Care, found that up to 97.3 percent of people who have previously experienced pancreatic disease are misdiagnosed, typically with Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin so the glucose stays in the blood instead of being used as fuel. This is often associated with obesity in people middle-aged or older. In contrast, type 3c diabetes happens following damage to the pancreas. It is also termed 'pancreatogenic diabetes'. Someone might have this if they are experiencing symptoms of cystic fibrosis, inflammation in the pancreas or pancreatic cancer. A wrong diagnosis can impact the treatment offered to patients. Type 3c diabetes requires insulin therapy more urgently than type 2 diabetes to defect the glucose deficiency in the blood. Senior author Professor Simo Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

Out of the estimated 24 million people with diabetes, one third, or eight million, don’t know they have the disease. According to Martin J. Abrahamson, M.D., Medical Director and Senior Vice President at Joslin Diabetes Center, this is because people with type 2 diabetes often have no symptoms. However, a simple blood test is all you need to find out if you are one the millions with untreated diabetes. Who should be tested? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that everyone aged 45 and over should be tested for diabetes, and if the results are normal, re-tested every three years. Testing should be conducted at earlier ages and carried out more frequently in individuals who have any of the following diabetes risk factors: You have a parent or sibling with diabetes You are overweight (BMI higher than 25) You are a member of a high-risk ethnic population (African American, Hispanic American, Native American, Asian American or Pacific Islander) You had gestational diabetes or a baby weighing over 9 pounds Your HDL cholesterol levels are 35 mg/dl or less, and/or your triglyceride level is 250 mg/dl or above You have high blood pressure You have polycystic ovarian syndrome On previous testing, had impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting tolerance What tests are used for diagnosis? Fasting Plasma Glucose –This blood test is taken in the morning, on an empty stomach. A level of 126 mg/dl or above, on more than one occasion, indicates diabetes. Casual or Random Glucose - This blood test can be taken anytime during the day, without fasting. A glucose level of 200 mg/dl and above may suggest diabetes. If any of these test results occurs, testing should be repeated on a different day to confirm the diagnosis. If a casual plasma glucose equal to 200 mg/dl or Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Just Been Diagnosed?

Just Been Diagnosed?

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes it can be overwhelming. Your doctor will provide you with a lot of information and ask you a number of questions, about your eating patterns, weight history, blood pressure, medications you might be taking, any family history of heart disease and any treatments you have received for other health problems. If appropriate, the doctor will ask whether you smoke or drink. If you’re a mother you may also be asked about your child or children’s health. Don't be too alarmed by these questions, your doctor isn’t prying. All of this information has a bearing on your diabetes and how to best manage it. Until a cure is found, if you have diabetes you have it for life. The good news is that by keeping your blood glucose levels with range you can significantly reduce your risk of developing serious health problems associated with diabetes. Ensuring your diabetes is well managed is key and there’s no one better qualified to do it than you. Taking charge of diabetes doesn’t have to be a full time job, but you do have to be mindful of it 24/7, whether you’re eating, working or going to bed. You’ll have a health care team of people to help you, including your doctor, Credentialled Diabetes Educator, dietician, podiatrist and eye specialist. This is your diabetes healthcare team. The team approach helps you to learn all you need to know about diabetes, treatment and management. Your doctor will also want do a thorough physical examination, including a careful look at your mouth, feet, eyes, abdomen, skin and thyroid gland (a gland at the base of your neck that releases hormones that helps your body use energy) and possibly a cardiac (heart) work-up. You’ll have a range of tests, including blood-lipid test for cholesterol. The initial Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Your health care professional can diagnose diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes through blood tests. The blood tests show if your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Do not try to diagnose yourself if you think you might have diabetes. Testing equipment that you can buy over the counter, such as a blood glucose meter, cannot diagnose diabetes. Who should be tested for diabetes? Anyone who has symptoms of diabetes should be tested for the disease. Some people will not have any symptoms but may have risk factors for diabetes and need to be tested. Testing allows health care professionals to find diabetes sooner and work with their patients to manage diabetes and prevent complications. Testing also allows health care professionals to find prediabetes. Making lifestyle changes to lose a modest amount of weight if you are overweight may help you delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Most often, testing for occurs in people with diabetes symptoms. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in children and young adults. Because type 1 diabetes can run in families, a study called TrialNet offers free testing to family members of people with the disease, even if they don’t have symptoms. Type 2 diabetes Experts recommend routine testing for type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older are between the ages of 19 and 44, are overweight or obese, and have one or more other diabetes risk factors are a woman who had gestational diabetes1 Medicare covers the cost of diabetes tests for people with certain risk factors for diabetes. If you have Medicare, find out if you qualify for coverage . If you have different insurance, ask your insurance company if it covers diabetes tests. Though type 2 diabetes most often develops in adults, children also ca Continue reading >>

How To Deal With The Diagnosis Of Diabetes

How To Deal With The Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Common Emotional Reactions Ann Bloise was so ashamed to learn she had type 2 diabetes that she didn't tell her family for three weeks. "I thought I got diabetes because I'm so overweight," the Dallas resident says. "I really felt that it was my fault." On top of her shame, she was terrified about how diabetes would affect her vision, her feet, and her heart. She also became depressed. "I was staring mortality in the face," she says. "Here I was, 44 years old, and I hadn't done half of the things I wanted to do in life." Being diagnosed with diabetes is an emotional experience that can arouse difficult feelings. Some people deny their illness or feel outrage. Others become depressed, feel tremendous guilt and shame, or are stricken with fear about the future. "All of these are common emotional reactions," says John Zrebiec, M.S.W., CDE, associate director of mental health services at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and a member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. "Diabetes can often bring with it a normal grief reaction. But the stages and intensity will differ from person to person, depending on life experiences," he says. Healthy Ways to Deal with a New Diagnosis Zrebiec says it may take as long as a year to come to terms with diabetes. If you're in the doldrums, try not to let negative feelings interfere with taking care of your health. Here are some strategies to keep them in check: Educate Yourself: "The more you learn, the more empowered you'll feel," says Paula Wilkerson of Albany, New York, who was initially terrified by her diagnosis. "Now I know the diagnosis doesn't mean life is over. You can begin an even better life that includes taking better care of yourself and understanding your body," she says. Open Up to Family and Friends: Rather tha Continue reading >>

Are Most People With Type 2 Diabetes In Denial About Their Condition And Eat As If Before Their Diagnosis?

Are Most People With Type 2 Diabetes In Denial About Their Condition And Eat As If Before Their Diagnosis?

Diabetes is a life long disease. I’ve had it since I was 27, I’m 60 now. Liang is not only terrible rude he is absolutely wrong about what diabetics do and don’t do. Individuals handle this diagnosis differently. However, every diabetic goes through bouts of believing that they don’t have to what they need to do. What you call, being in denial. For some this is at the beginning. They leave the doctor’s office and they are going to prove him/her wrong because they just know they are NOT diabetic. Most however, hit this period of denial after an initial acceptance of the disease and what it will require of them. Then the reality hits of how difficult it is to maintain a lifetime of good diet, exercise and control. So they give up. Usually they get back on the wagon eventually, but it can take a long time. Results may vary and they might only achieve partial control. Life can kick a diabetic right off their pins. Family and relationship problems tragedies can drive a diabetic to eat wrong, not monitor, not exercise or do the things they know they should not be doing because the rest of their life is so hard at the time. Speaking of hard, individuals that have little money and cannot afford to eat right, can’t pay for their medications so they cut back and take half doses, etc., etc. Others have insensitive and boorish physicians like Liang. No matter what they do, it isn’t enough or it isn’t right and so they just give up. If you are gong to be treated like a lazy failure, where do you find the strength to battle this life time sentence? A succinct answer to your question is that, yes, most diabetics deal with denial on and off throughout the course of their life. Some succumb to the delusion that they are not diabetic and they make no changes or make minim Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes Diagnosis

It is important for diabetes to be diagnosed early so treatment can be started as soon as possible. Diabetes is diagnosed by a blood test. Most people with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes will present with symptoms of diabetes such as increased thirst, urination and tiredness. Some people will also have signs of slow healing of wounds or persistent infections. However, many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all. A blood test is taken from a vein and sent to a pathology lab. The test may be either: a fasting sugar (glucose) test - fasting is required for at least eight hours, such as eating or drinking overnight a random glucose test taken anytime during the day an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) - where a patient who has fasted drinks a sugary drink and then has a blood test done 1 and then 2 hours later. The patient needs to eat and drink adequate (150 grams a day) of carbohydrates (starchy foods) for 3 days before the glucose tolerance test. Another blood test that can diagnose diabetes is the HbA1c test, which measures the percentage of haemoglobin molecules (the molecules that makes red blood cells red) in the blood that have a sugar molecule attached to them. Diabetes is diagnosed when: The fasting sugar level is >7mmol/L (on 2 separate occasions) The glucose tolerance test is >11mmol/L 2 hours after the sugary drink (on 2 separate occasions) The HbA1c level is >6.5% (on 2 separate occasions) Can diabetes be diagnosed with a blood glucose meter or urine test? A diagnosis of diabetes should not be made only by using a blood glucose meter and finger prick, or by urine glucose test. Although your doctor may take a blood test with a finger prick in the consulting room, you will still need a further blood test sent to pathology to confirm Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, and symptoms generally come on gradually, they may go unnoticed for a long time, or they may be attributed to something else. For example, increased thirst may be chalked up to a hot summer, or fatigue may be interpreted as a sign of aging or stress. This is unfortunate, because even short-term high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) diminishes your quality of life. And if high blood sugar persists for a long time, it can eventually cause complications such as diabetic retinopathy or kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy) that cannot be completely reversed with improved blood sugar control. Type 2 diabetes can cause a wide range of signs and symptoms, including: Fatigue Dry mouth Thirst Excessive urination Hunger Weight loss Blurry vision Cloudy thinking Irritability Wounds that won't heal Infections associated with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes include gum infections, urinary tract infections (particularly in women), slowly healing wounds with subsequent infections, and infections of the feet. Symptoms in Men Type 2 diabetes symptoms are generally the same for men and women. However, urological problems such as erectile dysfunction (ED) — the inability to achieve or maintain an erection — have been associated with all forms of diabetes, including type 2. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, 20 to 75 percent of men with any type of diabetes have ED. Researchers believe diabetes causes sexual function problems in men due to damage to the body's autonomic nervous system, which controls circulation. If you have the symptoms of ED, it may be a sign you have diabetes. Another urological problem associated with diabetes in men is retrograde ejaculation, or the release of semen into the bladder during ejaculation. Sym Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With Diabetes? Here's Help

Just Diagnosed With Diabetes? Here's Help

Hearing the words you have diabetes scares some, upsets others, and overwhelms most. Yes, it's serious, and yes, you'll need to make some adjustments. But diabetes is a disease you can control, says Kim DeCoste, RN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. "An important first step for the newly diagnosed is to realize that you can be a healthy person living with diabetes. A few lifestyle changes can help you manage your blood sugar and feel better day to day. You can lead a very normal, healthy life." Here, six expert-recommended tips to help set you on a path for success: 1. Ignore the horror stories. Tell people you have diabetes and inevitably you hear about so-and-so's great aunt who had her leg amputated or the friend of a friend who almost went blind. True, these are real complications, but our knowledge about preventing them is so much better today, says Robert Henry, MD, president of medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association. Get your information from a reliable source: A good primary care physician or certified diabetes educator will help you best understand the disease, without overloading you with too much at once. You can also do some research on your own—visit the ADA at diabetes.org, or call (800) DIABETES. 2. Walk a little more. It's an easy way to boost physical activity, which lowers blood sugar for two reasons: Research shows that your body uses insulin more efficiently when you exercise, and working out helps you lose weight. Start with the old standards, says Henry: Take the stairs instead of the elevator, park in the farthest spot in the lot, get off the bus a stop early. Eventually work up to 30 minutes 5 days a week. For people with type 2, establishing a regular fitness routine may reduce or even e Continue reading >>

Understanding A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis

Understanding A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis

Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a manageable condition. Once you’re diagnosed, you can learn what to do to stay healthy. Diabetes is grouped into different types. The most commonly diagnosed are gestational diabetes, type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Maybe you have a friend who was told she had diabetes during pregnancy. That type is called gestational diabetes. It can develop during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born. Type 1 Diabetes You may have had a childhood friend with diabetes who had to take insulin every day. That type is called type 1 diabetes. The peak age of onset is in the midteens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 1 makes up 5 percent of all cases of diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes makes up 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, according to the CDC. It is also called adult-onset diabetes. Although it can occur at any age, it’s more common in people older than 40. If you think you might have diabetes, talk to your doctor. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can cause severe complications, such as: amputation of the legs and feet blindness heart disease kidney disease stroke According to the CDC, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. People with diabetes are 1.5 times as likely to die as people of the same age who don’t have diabetes. Many of the severe side effects of diabetes can be avoided with treatment. That’s why it’s so important to be diagnosed as soon as possible. Some people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they have symptoms. Early diabetes symptoms include: increased or frequent urination increased thirst fatigue cuts or sores that won Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes: Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes

What do the results mean? If you experience symptoms of severe increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, increased hunger, tingling of your hands or feet -- your doctor may suspect diabetes. To confirm the diagnosis, a fasting plasma glucose test or a casual plasma glucose test will be performed. The fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) is the preferred method of diagnosing diabetes because it is easy to do, convenient and less expensive than other tests, according to the American Diabetes Association. How Do I Prepare for the Test? You will not be allowed to eat anything for 10-12 hours before the FPG test. Blood will be drawn and sent to the lab for analysis. Normal fasting blood glucose is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL for people who do not have diabetes. The standard diagnosis of diabetes is made when two separate blood tests show that your fasting blood glucose level is greater than or equal to 126 mg/dL. However, if you have normal fasting blood glucose, but you have risk factors for diabetes or symptoms of diabetes and your fasting blood glucose is normal, your doctor may decide to do a glucose tolerance test (see below) to be sure that you do not have diabetes. Some people have a normal fasting blood glucose reading, but their blood glucose rapidly rises as they eat. These people may have glucose intolerance. If their blood glucose levels are high enough, they may be diagnosed with diabetes. The casual plasma glucose test is another method of diagnosing diabetes. During the test, blood glucose is tested without regard to the time since the person's last meal. You are not required to abstain from eating prior to the test. A glucose level greater than 200 mg/dL may indicate diabetes, especially if the test is repeated at a Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed

Newly Diagnosed

Being newly diagnosed with diabetes can be confusing and overwhelming with all the new things you have to learn and understand. This page provides a synopsis of the most important information and answers to commonly asked questions. What is Diabetes? Find out about diabetes: the terminology, symptoms, diagnosis and goals of treatment. Learn how the body keeps the blood sugar in balance. Types of Diabetes There are many type of diabetes. Learn more about your type of diabetes or look at the classification table to see a comprehensive list. Insulin given by injection is the central treatment for type 1 diabetes. There are fast acting and long acting insulin formulations. It is important to understand when to use these different formulations and the concepts behind choosing the right insulin dose. There is one other injected medication for type 1 diabetes, Symlin, that may be given in addition to insulin. The treatment for type 2 diabetes may be a simple as lifestyle changes (diet, exercise and weight management) with one or two pills to many different pills and/or insulin or other injected medications. Your medical team will help you decide the best choices for you. Find out if the treatment is working Blood sugar monitoring lets you know if the treatment plan is working and you are achieving the goals of therapy. And keeping a logbook helps everyone review and assess the results. Eating a healthy and balanced diet is another important part of living with diabetes. The first think you need to understand is which foods have sugar and starch (carbohydrates). When the blood sugar is uncontrolled When your blood sugar is too high or too low, you need to understand the symptoms and what to do. Some situations require urgent medical attention. When your blood sugar is not contr Continue reading >>

Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes - Thoughts And Feelings The Day After

Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes - Thoughts And Feelings The Day After

back to Overview Tips & Tricks Type 2 There have been exactly 3 events which created serious and lasting changes in my life... Those were (not in chronological order): 1. The birth of my son 2. My first “real” job 3. Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes Fear, then anger, and then what? Of course, the first two milestones were much more enjoyable than the third. I still remember feeling like the ground dropped out from under me and the subsequent roller coaster of emotions after being diagnosed with diabetes! It’s already been more than 3 years, and to this day I still describe my emotions of “the day after” as: “First came the fear, followed by the anger – and finally the curiosity.” The diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has been a positive change in my life Today I know that fear was neither appropriate nor necessary and was possibly a really bad motivator. Actually, I’ve found the diabetes diagnosis to be a blessing because without this warning shot across the bow, I probably would have never made so many positive changes in my life. Listen well, because this is coming from a former smoker, workaholic, gifted excuse maker, and overweight guy. Today I am a passionate athlete, I have learned (and implemented) a lot about nutrition, I feel years younger, I am energetic and fitter than ever. And most importantly, my diabetes is almost gone! Bye bye, Monster! I can say with full personal conviction that a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes can be a real opportunity to make a change for the better! The long-term consequences of unmanaged diabetes are not to be trifled with, so take advantage of this opportunity! It’s a fact! Knowledge is power. One reaction still serves me well – the curiosity. At the time, I wanted to know everything. Who is this monster called Continue reading >>

More in diabetes