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How Are Diabetes Test Strips Made

Why Are Test Strips For Diabetes So Expensive?

Why Are Test Strips For Diabetes So Expensive?

Test strips used with a glucometer allow you to accurately check your blood glucose levels. These are disposable, meaning that you can't reuse it. So, if you have to test your glucose levels daily, that means buying test strips becomes part of your budget. However, test strips don’t come cheap. This could be because companies know that test strips offer on ongoing business while a glucometer is a one-time purchase. Many insurers pay for test trips if you have a prescription. But then again, sometimes they limit the number of test strips you can use. This won't do because you often need to test blood sugar more than once a day. Skipping test is also dangerous because diabetes can wreck your body once it is out of control. Many manufactures attribute the high cost on research and development. However, the cost of test strips should come down once upfront costs of building plants and the like are met and this doesn't happen. The best way to stop test trips from burning a hole on your pocket is to buy comparatively cheaper ones. Many online e-commerce portals offer test strips manufactured by different companies. Compare their prices and look for information from various websites regarding their quality. Continue reading >>

How Do People In The Uk And Canada Feel About Their Healthcare System?

How Do People In The Uk And Canada Feel About Their Healthcare System?

Growing up I had pectus excavatum, a condition caused by a deformity in the rib cage. It’s pretty ugly: The cost of getting this fixed privately in the US is about $40,000. It’s cosmetic so most insurances won’t pay for it. And the kicker is the operation needs to be done before your bones fully calcify (early 20s) or the results are far worse and the damage is far greater. Now my family could probably have found that money but the guilt would have killed me. And no way could I have earned it myself at that point in my life. The NHS saw it, noted that it was sufficiently severe to affect my quality of life and booked me in to have it fixed at one of the best hospitals in the world. All free of charge. I’ll end up paying it back via taxes. In the meantime I get 60+ years of taking my shirt off without looking like a carnival attraction. Free markets and socio-economics be damned, the NHS has helped me get laid. Universal healthcare is great. Continue reading >>

Glucometer Test Kit

Glucometer Test Kit

Background Diabetes mellitus effects an estimated 16 million people in the United States. An additional five million people have the disease and do not realize it. Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that affects the pancreas's ability to produce or respond to insulin. The two major forms of diabetes are type I and type II. Both types of diabetes can have elevated blood sugar levels due to insufficiencies of insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a key regulator of the body's metabolism. After meals, food is digested in the stomach and intestines. Carbohydrates are broken down into sugar molecules—of which glucose is one—and proteins are broken down into amino acids. Glucose and amino acids are absorbed directly into the bloodstream, and blood glucose levels rise. Normally, the rise in blood glucose levels signals important cells in the pancreas—called beta-cells—to secrete insulin, which pours into the bloodstream. Insulin then enables glucose and amino acids to enter cells in the body where, along with other hormones, it directs whether these nutrients will be burned for energy or stored for future use. As blood sugar falls to pre-meal levels, the pancreas reduces the production of insulin, and the body uses its stored energy until the next meal provides additional nutrients. In type I diabetes, the beta-cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are gradually destroyed; eventually insulin deficiency is absolute. Without insulin to move glucose into cells, blood sugar levels become excessively high, a condition known as hyperglycemia. Because the body cannot utilize the sugar, it spills over into the urine and is lost. Weakness, weight loss, and excessive hunger and thirst are among several indicators of this disease. Patients become depen Continue reading >>

Why You Should Worry About The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Test Strips

Why You Should Worry About The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Test Strips

True or false: The FDA guarantees the safety and accuracy of blood glucose test strips currently on the market. Answer: False. If I may quote from the website of StripSafely, a patient-run effort to ensure test strip quality, “The FDA reviews test strips presented by manufacturers before the strips can be marketed but not after. Strips can and do vary after they are marketed. There is no post market review.” Are you surprised? I certainly was. That’s why l attended last week’s summit led by David Klonoff of the Diabetes Technology Society in Bethesda, Maryland about a proposed post-market surveillance program for diabetes test strips. Klonoff is a clinical professor in the division of endocrinology and metabolism at UCSF; he founded the Diabetes Technology Society , which is a non-profit, non-governmental organization “committed to promoting development and use of technology in the fight against diabetes” in 2001. The meeting was a follow-up to a previous DTS gathering in May 2013 that focused on the overall issue of test strip quality. The upshot of that first meeting? There are quality issues. According to The Diabetes Care Project’s summary of two recent studies on the issue: The first study found that “of the 27 SMBG [self-monitoring of blood glucose] systems available in the United States, more than half of them (16) do not meet ISO standards, the common gold standard for meter accuracy.” The second found that “only three of seven SMBG systems sold in the United States consistently met ISO accuracy standards, and since this study was conducted, even tighter ISO standards have been adopted.” On the surface, this already sounds shocking – but let’s delve into what it actually means. First, ISO is the acronym for the International Standardiza Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test Strips

Diabetes Test Strips

Tweet Blood glucose test strips (diabetes test strips) are a key component of blood glucose testing. These small disposable strips of plastic may look insignificant but they provide a very important role in helping people with diabetes to monitor and control their diabetes. In the vast majority of cases, each meter will take one type of test strip only. There are some blood glucose meters however that take blood ketone strips as well, to test for ketone levels. How do diabetes test strips work? When blood is placed onto the test strip, it reacts with a chemical called glucose oxidase producing gluconic acid from the glucose in the blood. At the other end of the test strip, the meter transfers a current to the test strip. The test strip has electric terminals which allow the meter to measure the current between the terminals. The current between the terminals changes depending on the level of gluconic acid that has been produced. The blood glucose meter then uses an algorithm to work out the blood glucose level based upon the difference in current. Some blood glucose test strips allow the reapplication of more blood to the same test strip if needed during the test. The amount of blood required by a test strip can vary between manufacturers. Generally, between 0.5 μl to 1 μl of blood is required. Some test strips, not so commonly used these days, do not require a meter. When blood is placed on the active part of the strip and then wiped off after a specified number of seconds, the reagent will change colour and the result can be obtained by matching the colour of against a colour chart on the side of the pot. It is less accurate than using a blood glucose meter but the test strips can often be cheaper. Where can I get test strips? Within the UK, blood glucose test strip Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

2 Ways You Could Save On Blood Sugar Test Strips

2 Ways You Could Save On Blood Sugar Test Strips

Blood sugar testing is a way to keep track of how well diabetes is being managed. Test results help to show how food, physical activity and diabetes medications affect blood sugar. The number of blood sugar tests a person with diabetes may do varies. It depends on the treatment plan. Some people test their blood sugar several times a day. Others test less often. Sometimes extra tests may be needed, such as when starting a new medication or adjusting an insulin dose. Every blood sugar test uses a test strip. Every box of strips usually comes with a cost–typically a 20% co-insurance payment after the Part B deductible. It could be tempting to skip tests if strips start to cost too much. Medicare understands how important regular testing is to diabetes self-management. There is now a competitive bidding process that helps Medicare select suppliers that meet its standards for the quality and cost of diabetic supplies. Here are two ways that you can get the blood sugar test strips you need at the lower cost that Medicare’s competitive bidding process offers. 1. Order blood sugar test strips from a Medicare contracted mail-order supplier. Medicare has a mail-order program for diabetic testing supplies. Medicare sets the amount it will pay based on bids from suppliers. Contracted suppliers may not charge you more than 20% co-insurance on the Medicare-approved amount. You can enter your zip code to find a supplier on the Medicare web site. Check the box for “Mail-Order Diabetic Supplies,” then scroll down and click the Search button. You’ll get a list of contracted suppliers. You’ll need to check each supplier to see which ones carry what you need. You can usually transfer your prescription to any supplier. Test strips or other diabetic supplies you order can then b Continue reading >>

Printing Low-cost Glucose Test Strips On Paper

Printing Low-cost Glucose Test Strips On Paper

Imagine just being able to fire up an inkjet printer and print out perfectly usable glucose test strips. Ah, the money that could be saved, among other things! It may seem off-the-wall strange, but a startup company that began almost three years ago as a Clemson University student research project in South Carolina, Accessible Diagnostics, is developing what it calls GlucoSense, a new type of test strip made out of commonly-available materials that costs just pennies to make in comparison to what’s out there now. We also happened to hear of a Bangalore company developing silk-weaved strips featured in a recent NPR story, with hopes of rolling out their offering by year’s end. These efforts come at a time when both health care costs and the rates of diabetes are skyrocketing in the U.S. and around the world — meaning more people than ever need glucose strips, while fewer have affordable access these essential diabetes supplies. Since GlucoSense is led by in large part by a young type 1, just finishing grad school, we couldn’t wait to find out more. A Solution for Tanzania The Chief Technology Officer is 24-year-old Kayla Gainey, fellow type 1 who was diagnosed at age 2. Kayla got involved at Clemson when she went to speak to her professor, Dr. Delphine Dean, about graduate school and a possible summer internship. She heard about the research project aimed at helping those with diabetes in the East African country Tanzania, where diabetes supplies are far from accessible. Dean had met with the country’s leader, who told her about the huge diabetes problem there and how even donated supplies don’t help much because the meters and strips are often mismatched, and cannot be used together. So, Dean came back with this idea and soon enough had roughly a dozen stude Continue reading >>

Prodigy® No Coding Test Strips

Prodigy® No Coding Test Strips

Features • No Coding required • Works with all Prodigy meters • Approved for Alternate Site Testing (AST) • Capillary action makes testing easy! One Strip, Three Meters Prodigy® No Coding Test Strips work with the Prodigy AutoCode®, Pocket, and Voice meters. The 3 lead technology allows the meters to test only when there is enough blood on the test strip, saving the user test strips and money. The capillary action automatically draws the blood sample into the test strip. Prodigy® No Coding test strips do not use GDH-PQQ technology and are approved for alternate site testing. Our glucose oxidase technology allow for safer and more accurate results. Continue reading >>

How Onedrop’s $40/month For “unlimited Test Strips” Works

How Onedrop’s $40/month For “unlimited Test Strips” Works

I was skeptical when I first read the description of One Drop‘s diabetes program: unlimited test-strips for a monthly subscription of $39.99/month (or $33.33/month if you pay for a year upfront). There are actually several services that come with this monthly fee, but the cost of test-strips is what intrigued me most. Unlimited? Seriously? Surely there must be something in the fine-print that turns this blood sugar management fantasy into real life? My skepticism quickly transformed into fascination when I read Will Dubois’ review of One Drop on DiabetesMine. Like George Washington, Will Dubois doesn’t tell a lie. If Will says it’s legit, it’s legit. Today, I’m very happy to report that I am officially a subscribing member of One Drop! I hope their unlimited test-strips program forces Bigpharma to change how they treat people with diabetes. (As in: Hey BigPharma & Health Insurance, your whole “we want you to be as healthy as possible but we don’t want to make it affordable for you” thing…that’s absolute bulls*t. And One Drop knows it.) Okay, so before you read my full review, I want to explain: I am not being paid by One Drop and they didn’t even ask me to review their product! I became a subscribing member all on my own volition, and I’m so freaking excited about giving my money to them instead of to the crooked pharma/health insurance industry. I simply can’t help but write about it, because I think you’ll want to be part of it, too. And of course, I’m most excited about actually being able to get the number of test-strips I need in order to manage my type 1 diabetes the way I want to! The Full Scoop on One Drop & What They Offer It isn’t just about the test-strips…but, actually, let me explain a little more about the test-strips. B Continue reading >>

Glucose Test Strips Made In The Usa

Glucose Test Strips Made In The Usa

In the heat of the presidential race candidates from both parties are battling over several issues. One issue that is particularly interconnected with economy and job creation is product offshoring. Product offshoring happens when a company decides to outsource their manufacturing or operational processes with the goal of lowering the cost of their products. Almost all manufacturers now prefer to have their products made overseas. And the manufacturers of glucose test strips are no exceptions. The test strip industry has largely fled the U.S as most test strip makers now have their strips made in China or Taiwan, where they can save on labor, utility, and taxes. Though it seems that most test strips are made fairly in the same way, most manufacturers choose to have their test strips made overseas. There are a few manufacturers of test strips who still take the long road to make their test strips here in the United States. Among the manufacturers that refuse to give in and insist on manufacturing domestically is PharmaTech whose GenStrip50 strips are proudly made in the U.S.A. Some test strip makers have one manufacturing plant here and another overseas. For example, Roche, the manufacturer of Accu-Check test strips has a manufacturing plant in Indianapolis that turns out over 4 billion test strips a year. Though it’s not clear why, Roche chooses to make some of their test strips here in the U.S and others overseas. According to a new nationally representative survey by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, when Americans were presented with a choice between a product made in the U.S.A and a product made overseas, 78 percent of people said they would prefer to purchase the American product. Most American consumers want to know where products are made and want Continue reading >>

Glucose Testing

Glucose Testing

Glucose Testing Glucose Testing is a important and vital part of a diabetics daily health care. Without testing, a diabetic can become sick because their glucose levels are not where they need to be. Glucose testing is done by using a glucose testing meter, which uses a glucose testing strip. Glucose Testing Meter Steps for Testing Glucose To test for glucose one must drop a sample of blood by placing on the strip. This is done by poking the skin with a needle called a lancet. The lancet pricks the finger which allows the sample of blood to flow right onto the glucose strip. Once the blood sample has made it on to the glucose strip, a device called a glucose meter is used to measure the glucose in the blood. In each test strip, there is a chemical called glucose oxidase. This glucose oxidase reacts with the glucose in the blood sample and is created into a acid called gluconic acid. This current is then able to read and determine how much glucose is in the sample of blood on the testing strip. The number is then relayed on the screen of the glucose testing meter. Blood Glucose Meters A glucose meter is used to determine the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. The glucose meter is a key element in monitoring diabetes can help test if the blood sugar is too high or low. Glucose meters are small and are handheld, they can fit in the palm of a hand. Glucose meters cost anywhere from $20 to the most advanced meters costing $500. Examples One Touch Verio Glucose Meter System The One Touch Verio glucose meter is practical, reliable, and affordable. This glucose meter provides instant notifications of high and low blood sugar trends, unsurpassed accuracy, and requires a very small blood sample size. The Verio glucose meter is one of the more recent and efficient Continue reading >>

Impact Of Epidemic Rates Of Diabetes On The Chinese Blood Glucose Testing Market

Impact Of Epidemic Rates Of Diabetes On The Chinese Blood Glucose Testing Market

Go to: China has become the country with the largest diabetes mellitus population in the world since the 1990s. About 100 million diabetes cases have been diagnosed since 2008. Handheld blood glucose meters and test strips are urgently needed for daily patient measurement. The glucose monitor with a screen-printed carbon-based glucose electrode has been in commercial production since 1994. Since then, approximately 20 companies have been involved in manufacturing and marketing meters and test strips in China. The current market and production volume and updates on technology issues are discussed in this article. Keywords: blood glucose meter, blood sugar, diabetes, market, mediator Go to: Introduction Glucose sensors account for approximately 95 the current Chinese market for biosensors, which have been estimated at approximately $80–100 million.1,2 The reasons why the blood glucose market was particularly receptive are numerous, but the biggest factor is the prevalence of diabetes in China. In a countrywide study3 from June 2007 through May 2008 in 14 provinces and municipalities, 92.4 million adults with diabetes were confirmed (50.2 million men and 42.2 million women) and a further 148.2 million adults were also found with prediabetes (76.1 million men and 72.1 million women). These results indicate that diabetes has become a major public health problem in China, and national strategies aimed at preventing, detecting, and treating diabetes are urgently needed. The report also reveals that diabetes in rural residents has been rated at 8.2%, i.e., approximately 43.1 million persons suffered, which is a very high volume compared with only 0.65% 10 years earlier. The situation is even worse still; incidence of the disease has risen 10–12% annually since 2005, and a f Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

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