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How Are Diabetes And Hypertension Related

High Blood Pressure And Diabetic Kidney Disease

High Blood Pressure And Diabetic Kidney Disease

High blood pressure (hypertension) is one of the principal causes of diabetic kidney disease and kidney failure. When blood pressure is high, there is a large amount of tension inside the blood vessels that leads to damage. These vessels may close off completely which can cause a heart attack, stroke, or kidney failure. High blood sugar and high cholesterol can also damage blood vessels. Thus people with diabetes who also have hypertension are at especially high risk for blood vessel damage. It usually takes years for blood vessels to completely close off and damage to blood vessels can be slowed down or reversed with treatment. Diagnosis Diagnosis of high blood pressure can only be done by having your blood pressure measured by a person trained in taking blood pressures. Usually, there are no symptoms that can tell you that you have high blood pressure. In diabetic patients the blood pressure is considered high if it is greater than 130/80. Your blood pressure should be measured on multiple occasions as blood pressures vary normally throughout the day and it is normal to have occasional high pressures. Blood pressure should be taken after you have rested for 5 minutes and may be taken sitting or standing. Your healthcare providers may ask you to check your blood pressure at home and record the readings as part of your blood pressure management. Treatment There are multiple ways to control your blood pressure. The first step is lifestyle changes. Most patients will also need one or several medications to achieve good blood pressure control. Lifestyle Changes Your diet and lifestyle can directly affect blood pressure. For example, too much salt, alcohol, or caffeine intake leads to your body increase your blood pressure. Your weight also affects your blood pressure. Incr Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure (hypertension) High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes is a condition in which the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is too high because your body cannot use it properly. This happens because your body either cannot use or make a hormone called insulin, which is responsible for turning sugar into food for your body's cells. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1, where your body is unable to produce any insulin Type 2, where your body either does not produce enough insulin, or cannot use it. Symptoms of diabetes The main symptoms of diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequently needing to go to the toilet, especially at night Extreme tiredness Weight loss Blurred vision Genital itching Thrush If diabetes is not controlled, it can cause serious damage to your kidneys, eyes, nervous system, heart and blood vessels. Treatment for diabetes aims to avoid this by keeping blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. Type 1 diabetes is usually treated by insulin injections, as well as healthy eating and being active. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated by healthy eating and being active alone, but sometimes tablets or insulin injections are also needed. Diabetes and high blood pressure About 25% of people with Type 1 diabetes and 80% of people with Type 2 diabetes have high blood pressure. Having diabetes raises your risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and other health problems. Having high blood pressure also raises this risk. If you have diabetes and high blood pressure together, this raises your risk of health problems even more. If you have diabetes, your doctor will want to be sure that your blood pressure is very well controlled. This means that they will probably want your blood pressure to be below 130 over 80. People with diabetes and high blood pressure are sometimes given the blood pressure Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hypertension: What Is The Relationship?

Diabetes And Hypertension: What Is The Relationship?

Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, often affects people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association reports that from 2000 to 2012, 71 percent of adults with diabetes had a blood pressure of greater or equal to 140/90 or were taking medications to help normalize blood pressure. What are hypertension and diabetes Many people with diabetes also have hypertension, or high blood pressure. Having these conditions together can make them both worse. What is hypertension? Known the "silent killer," hypertension usually has no signs or symptoms and many people are not aware they have it. High blood pressure increases a person's risk of stroke and heart attack. It often occurs with diabetes. Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) and can be assessed using a blood pressure monitor. Two numbers will be produced. The first refers to the systolic blood pressure, or the highest level of the blood pressure during a heartbeat. The second, the diastolic blood pressure, points to the lowest level. Any blood pressure reading of less than or equal to 119/79 is considered normal. A reading between 120 and 139 for systolic pressure and between 80 and 89 for diastolic pressure is considered prehypertension. This is a sign of possible hypertension if a person does not take preventive steps. A doctor will diagnose a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or higher as high blood pressure. People can control hypertension with healthy lifestyle habits. These can include exercise and a low-fat, low-sodium diet. If necessary, a person with hypertension may reduce their blood pressure using medication. What is diabetes? Diabetes occurs when blood sugar increases because the body cannot use the glucose properly. This happens when there a problem with insulin Continue reading >>

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you’ve probably already started counting carbs and exercising more to keep your blood sugar stable. But you may be neglecting another, often silent problem that can go hand-in-hand with diabetes: high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension, the condition occurs in as many as two-thirds of people with diabetes. If you have both conditions and either is out of control, your risk of blood vessel damage increases, heightening the likelihood of complications like heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. If both conditions are unmanaged, the risk is even greater. Here are six suggestions to help keep your blood pressure in check. RELATED: Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers 1. Get up and move Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It strengthens the heart and makes it pump more efficiently, so it is particularly critical if you have hypertension. To improve cardiovascular health and maintain your weight, try to get 150 minutes each week of aerobic activity. You want to spread this over at least three days, with no more than two consecutive days without exercise. This can include walking, cycling and swimming. 2. Eat fresh, natural foods If you find yourself struggling to figure out which foods in the grocery aisles have too much sodium, here’s a good tip to follow: Food in its natural state is best. Skip over processed foods and opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. 3. Reduce salt If you are planning to start a low-sodium diet (no more than 1,500 mg per day), the first step is to get rid of the salt shaker. In its place, use salt-free herbs, spices and other seasonings. It’s also important to watch for hidden sodium in the foods you eat. The following items are typically hi Continue reading >>

Risk Factors And Complications In Patients With Hypertension/diabetes In A Regional Health District Of Northeast Brazil

Risk Factors And Complications In Patients With Hypertension/diabetes In A Regional Health District Of Northeast Brazil

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Factores de riesgo y complicaciones en hipertensos/diabéticos de una región sanitaria del noreste brasileño Jênifa Cavalcante dos SantosI; Thereza Maria Magalhães MoreiraII IRN. Student of the Graduate Program (master degree) in Clinical Health Care, Universidade Estadual do Ceará. CAPES fellow. Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. [email protected] IIAdjunct Professor at Universidade Estadual do Ceará. Faculty off the Doctorate Program in Clinical Health Care and in Collective Health, Universidade Estadual do Ceará. CNPq researcher. Head of the Research Group on Epidemiology, Epidemiologia, Care in Chronicity and Nursing. Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. [email protected] ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors and associated complications present in clients with hypertension/diabetes, enrolled in the HIPERDIA of the Executive Regional Health Department VI in Fortaleza, CE. This analytical documental study included 2,691 people. Of this total, 73.6% were women; 44.6% were between 60-79 years of age (mean age of 60.8 years); 87.4% were Caucasian, Asian or Pardo; 63.7% had eight or fewer years of education; 79.7% were non-smokers; 56.6% were considered sedentary; 59.6% were overweight/obese; and 48.4% had a family history of cardiovascular disease. An association was observed between having a sedentary lifestyle and being overweight/obese among patients with diabetes, and those with both diabetes and hypertension; family history of cardiovascular disease in patients with hypertension and those with both diabetes and hypertension; stroke, coronary artery disease and chronic renal failure in patients with hypertension and those with both diabetes and hypertension; and infarction and stroke in patients with diabetes. A family history of car Continue reading >>

Hypertension And Diabetes In Obesity

Hypertension And Diabetes In Obesity

International Journal of Hypertension Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 695869, 2 pages 1Human Neurotransmitters Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 8008, Australia 2Nucleus Network Ltd., Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 8008, Australia 3Endocrinology and Metabolic Disease, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System and David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA 4Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia Copyright © 2011 Kazuko Masuo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The epidemic-like rise in the prevalence of obesity constitutes an undoubted and serious global health problem. Importantly, hypertension and diabetes are frequently associated with obesity and, together, constitute a significant burden in terms of patients’ morbidity and escalating health care costs. When considered in isolation, obesity, hypertension, and diabetes are all associated with increased risk of the development of cardiovascular and renal complications; however, the coexistence of this triumvirate generates a substantial elevation in disease risk. The driving forces linking obesity, hypertension, and diabetes remain to be clarified due, in part, to the complex and multifactorial nature of the conditions that involve combinations of environmental, genetic, life style, and behavioural confounders. Additionally, it is recognized that neuroendocrine mechanisms, including insulin resistance, sympathetic nervous activation, and stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RA Continue reading >>

Pregnancy-related High Blood Pressure, Diabetes Linked To Later Heart Disease

Pregnancy-related High Blood Pressure, Diabetes Linked To Later Heart Disease

Most of the changes that come with pregnancy—growing a belly “bump,” being tired, mood swings, cravings for particular foods, and the like—are normal, temporary, and harmless. Two other changes, pregnancy-related high blood pressure and diabetes, may have long-lasting implications for heart health. The development of high blood pressure during pregnancy is known as preeclampsia; pregnancy-related diabetes is called gestational diabetes. They are different from “regular” high blood pressure and diabetes because both are “cured” by delivery. Yet a new study published this week in the journal Circulation suggests that these complications boost a woman’s risk of cardiovascular disease during middle age. Researchers looked at the pregnancies of more than 3,400 women enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children in the early 1990s and followed their health for nearly 20 years. By age 50, the 10-year risk for heart disease was 31% higher for women who developed preeclampsia during their pregnancies than women who didn’t. Those who developed gestational diabetes had a 26% higher 10-year risk. Preeclampsia and gestational diabetes also affected the women’s babies. Women with preeclampsia were more likely to give birth to underweight babies and deliver prematurely. Women with gestational diabetes were more likely to deliver overweight babies. Preventing problems before and after The findings from the Avon Longitudinal Study suggest that pregnancy may be a kind of months-long “test” of the heart and other systems. Preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and other pregnancy-related complications could be early signs of some underlying problem that eventually leads to heart disease. Can these problems be avoided? Sometimes. Women who are not y Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is a measurement of the force of your blood against the blood vessel walls. There are often no signs of high blood pressure. This means that you may have high blood pressure and not know it. The recommended target for people with diabetes is less than 130/80 mm Hg. The top number is the pressure when your heart contracts and pushes blood out (systolic). The bottom number is the pressure when the heart relaxes between beats (diastolic). Why is controlling blood pressure important for people with diabetes? When blood pressure is high, it puts stress on the body. This can cause damage to the heart, brain, kidneys, and eyes. High blood glucose levels are a risk factor for hypertension (high blood pressure) as it can lead to hardening of the arteries. Compared to people without diabetes, people with diabetes are much more likely to develop heart disease and/or experience a stroke at an earlier age. If you have diabetes, get your blood pressure checked every time you visit your health-care team. Am I doing all that I can to control my blood pressure? Do I have my blood pressure checked every time I visit my health-care team? Am I at a healthy weight? Do I follow a healthy diet that includes vegetables, fruits, low-fat dairy products, and is low in sodium and saturated and trans fats? Am I physically active on a regular basis? Am I a non-smoker? Do I manage stress in a healthy way? Do I limit my alcohol intake? Do I take my medication as prescribed? Strategies to lower blood pressure Try these healthy eating tips: Choose vegetables and fruits more often (fresh or frozen without added salt). Choose low-fat (one per cent or skim) dairy products. Choose legumes (dried beans, peas and lentils) more often. Rinse canned beans with water. Choose whole grains such as wh Continue reading >>

What Are The Most Innovative And Promising Health Startups Out There?

What Are The Most Innovative And Promising Health Startups Out There?

Answer Wiki The question is about innovative health startups - NOT about all health startups. So each entry must contain the reason why they are innovative. ( If a website owner adds to this list in obvious self promotion then remove them from it.) For more detail - check out each of these online: - A Bangalore (India) based online mental health startup which connect doctors and patients from anywhere in the world. Allows you to ask mental health questions to doctors, and you will definitely get a reply. www.PatientsLikeMe.com - Allow people to share their own personal solutions to diseases without cures. The site makes money by selling this information to the companies trying to find cures for those diseases. www.HealthcareMagic.com - Allows you to ask health questions to Doctors on web & mobile. Get guaranteed and detailed answers "within minutes". Ask follow-up questions. Largest health handle on Twitter globally with over 830,000 followers. www.EyeNetra.com - "portable eye examination system requiring only a smart phone and a two dollar plastic lens attachment". Buzz in 2011, no product for sale as of March 2013. www.MedTronicRDN.com - built a device for treating severe hypertension by using a radio frequency approach to destroy the nerves in the kidney artery that trigger vasoconstriction Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hypertension: Is There A Common Metabolic Pathway?

Diabetes And Hypertension: Is There A Common Metabolic Pathway?

Go to: Etiology Genetics Genome scans involving thousands of subjects and controls have revealed a large number of genes with small effects, as opposed to a small number of genes with large effects anticipated originally [5, 6]. Genetic variants in the gene encoding angiotensinogen, adrenomedullin, apolipoprotein, and α-adducin have been reported to be associated with common conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, dysglycemia, or metabolic syndrome [7–10]. In Hong Kong studies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), SNPs that predict the development of diabetes were found also to predict the development of hypertension [11–14]. In genome scans in Hong Kong Chinese individuals, the region associated with diabetes was also associated with the metabolic syndrome, which includes hypertension as a component [15, 16]. A recent study at Columbia University on somatic gene conversion and deletion suggested that multitudes of common SNPs are involved [17•]. Besides the genetic aspect, another very important aspect for the onset of diabetes and hypertension is environmental. Environmental factors include the period in utero and lifestyle factors such as diet and physical activity. Gestational diabetes, fetal malnutrition, and high birth weight are three factors that may predispose the fetus to cardiometabolic syndrome in adulthood [18, 19•, 20]. High intake of sodium, alcohol, and unsaturated fat, smoking, lack of physical activity, and mental stress are examples of an unhealthy lifestyle. It is now realized that insulin resistance, which predicts type 2 diabetes, also has a role in the development of hypertension [21]. Indeed, hypertension and diabetes substantially share common pathways such as obesity, inflammation, oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and ment Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure (hypertension) can lead to many complications of diabetes, including diabetic eye disease and kidney disease, or make them worse. Most people with diabetes will eventually have high blood pressure, along with other heart and circulation problems. Diabetes damages arteries and makes them targets for hardening, called atherosclerosis. That can cause high blood pressure, which if not treated, can lead to trouble including blood vessel damage, heart attack, and kidney failure. Compared to those with normal blood pressure readings, people with hypertension more often have: Peripheral vascular disease, hardening of the arteries in the legs and feet Even blood pressure that's at the higher end of normal (120/80 to 129/80), called elevated, impacts your health. Studies show that you have a two to three times greater chance of getting heart disease over 10 years. Readings vary, but most people with diabetes should have a blood pressure of no more than 130/80. The first, or top, number is the "systolic pressure," or the pressure in your arteries when your heart squeezes and fills the vessels with blood. The second, or bottom, number is the "diastolic pressure," or the pressure in your arteries when your heart rests between beats, filling itself with blood for the next contraction. When it comes to preventing diabetes complications, normal blood pressure is as important as good control of your blood sugar levels. Usually, high blood pressure has no symptoms. That's why you need to check your blood pressure regularly. Your doctor will probably measure it at every visit, and you may need to check it at home, too. Many of the things you do for your diabetes will also help with high blood pressure: Control your blood sugar. Don't drink a lot of alcohol. Limit how m Continue reading >>

Complications Of Hypertension

Complications Of Hypertension

Main complications of persistent high blood pressure Complications of hypertension are clinical outcomes that result from persistent elevation of blood pressure.[1] Hypertension is a risk factor for all clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis since it is a risk factor for atherosclerosis itself.[2][3][4][5][6] It is an independent predisposing factor for heart failure,[7][8] coronary artery disease,[9][10] stroke,[1] renal disease,[11][12][13] and peripheral arterial disease.[14][15] It is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, in industrialized countries.[16] Complications affecting the heart[edit] Main articles: Left ventricular hypertrophy, Hypertensive cardiomyopathy, and Myocardial infarction Left ventricular hypertrophy Hypertensive heart disease is the result of structural and functional adaptations[17] leading to left ventricular hypertrophy,[18][19][20] diastolic dysfunction,[17][19] CHF, abnormalities of blood flow due to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease[17] and microvascular disease,[9][18] and cardiac arrhythmias.[18] Individuals with left ventricular hypertrophy are at increased risk for, stroke,[21] CHF,[21] and sudden death.[21] Aggressive control of hypertension can regress or reverse left ventricular hypertrophy and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.[22] [23][24][25] left ventricular hypertrophy are seen in 25% of the hypertensive patients and can easily be diagnosed by using echocardiography.[26] Underlying mechanisms of hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy are of 2 types: mechanical, mainly leading to myocyte hypertrophy; neuro-hormonal, mainly resulting in a fibroblastic proliferation.[26] Abnormalities of diastolic function, ranging from asymptomatic heart disease[27][28][29] to overt heart Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Hypertension

Type 2 Diabetes And Hypertension

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a condition that’s often present in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s unknown why there’s such a significant correlation between the two diseases. It’s believed that obesity, a diet high in fat and sodium, and inactivity contribute to both conditions. Hypertension is known as a “silent killer” because it has no obvious symptoms and many people are unaware that they have it. A 2013 survey by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) found that fewer than half of people at risk for heart disease or type 2 diabetes reported discussing biomarkers, including blood pressure, with their care providers. If you have hypertension, it means that your blood is pumping through your heart and blood vessels with too much force. Over time, consistently high blood pressure tires the heart muscle and can enlarge it. In 2008, 67 percent of adults aged 20 and over with self-reported diabetes had blood pressure rates of greater than 140/90. In the general population and in people with diabetes, a blood pressure reading of less than or equal to 140/90 is considered normal. What does this mean? The first number (140) is called the systolic pressure. It indicates the highest pressure exerted as blood pushes through your heart. The second number (90) is called the diastolic pressure. This is the pressure maintained by the arteries when the vessels are relaxed between heartbeats. Healthy people should get their blood pressure checked several times a year. People with diabetes need to be even more vigilant. If you have diabetes, you should have your pressure checked at least four times each year. If you have diabetes and high blood pressure, the ADA recommends that you self-monitor at home, record the readings, and share them with your doctor. Ac Continue reading >>

What Is The Physiological Difference Between Someone Who Gets By On 5 Hours Vs. 7 Hours Of Sleep A Night?

What Is The Physiological Difference Between Someone Who Gets By On 5 Hours Vs. 7 Hours Of Sleep A Night?

This isn't my expertise, but I do love a bit of research! Here is what I found out. Short answer: The difference also depends on factors of personal genetics, age, and the "quality" of the sleep. The way you operate on 5, might be how your friend runs on 7, and how your mom run on 9. Here are three points of information I dug up in a few minutes. 1. Five instead of eight hours: "Researchers following more than 1,000 people found that those who slept for five instead of eight hours had 15 percent lower levels of leptin and 15 percent higher levels of ghrelin. These two hormones regulate how hungry you feel, and lower levels of leptin and increased ghrelin both increase appetite. " "For example, one study showed that people who got only 4.5 hours of sleep 10 days in a row had levels of a protein marker for inflammatory processes that were three times higher at the end of that period than at the beginning. " Source: 2. "Sleep affects young and old brains differently" - From middle-aged and older, the amount of sleep seems to be most important. When you're young however, this article implies you could get by with fewer hours as long as they were quality hours. "Older adults who had slept for more total time the previous night were able to more accurately remember a list of random nouns[...]" "On the other hand, in younger folks, the quality of sleep, and not the total amount, affected memory the next day." source: 3. "Most healthy adults need between 7.5 to 9 hours of sleep per night to function at their best. Children and teens need even more." This doesn't line up with the information from the study in point 1, however. What about 7 as the magic number? Well, the article also mentions:"Just because you’re able to operate on 7 hours of sleep doesn’t mean you wouldn’t Continue reading >>

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