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How Are Diabetes And Heart Disease Related

How Can Overweight People Who Are Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes Continue To Eat High Sugar Foods?

How Can Overweight People Who Are Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes Continue To Eat High Sugar Foods?

TLDR: Get diabetes, eat what you want. Go blind, lose limbs, as well as independence. Totally killing yourself slowly. Think of it like smoking, you aren't directly killing yourself, but you are setting in motion the circumstances of your own demise. As Karen Tiede said, it takes a long time to kill you. You can eat what you want, but be prepared for the horrific health consequences. What CAN kill you quickly, is diabetic shock, or having too low of blood sugar, but that generally happens from injecting too much insulin, or you know... not eating. Fun fact: My dad was diagnosed with diabetes when he was 40. This was before I was even born. He was morbidly obese, I would say, I mean the man is huge in pictures but he was able to get around well enough. No need for a rascal or any other mobility help. Anyway, he ignored his diabetes for over a decade, 13 years in fact. He simply didn't have time to worry about his health when he was working so much and providing for his wife and 8, yes I said 8, children. Well, because he didn't take care of himself for so long, he developed what I would say is an unforeseen side effect doctors don't really tell you about. At least I don't hear much about it in regards to diabetes. He went blind. He drove A LOT for work. He was a regional manager for a major bakery in the northwest. He knew his vision was going bad, but he couldn't afford to not do his job. So he kept quiet about it, until one day when he got into a horrible car accident. What's funny is this accident wasn't on the highway, or some extreme circumstance, he was about a mile from home. His depth perception was shot and he failed to brake at a red light. He isn't dead if that is what you think I am leading up to. No he is very much alive. However, I'm pretty certain he wishe Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure (hypertension) High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Thing You Can Do At Age 30 To Benefit Your Life At Age 50 And Beyond?

What Is The Best Thing You Can Do At Age 30 To Benefit Your Life At Age 50 And Beyond?

You asked for one, but I'm going to give you five to cover various aspects of your life - physical, mental, emotional/spiritual, social, and financial. 1) Physical -- Find one or two exercises that you actually enjoy doing Anyone can tell you to run, lift, do yoga, bike, do Crossfit, etc, but if you truly don't enjoy it, you'll never develop a lifelong habit. I've tried just about every type of exercise over the past 30 years, until I discovered what works best for me and my body: yoga, swimming, and walking. I do all three just about everyday, because I enjoy them and they make my body feel good. 2) Mental -- Develop a love of reading Set aside at least 30 minutes every day to read something (and I'm not talking about a blog or social media post). I'm talking about an actual book -- it can be fiction or non-fiction, hard copy or electronic. The more you read, the more you learn, understand other viewpoints, and develop your curiosity and creativity. 3) Emotional / Spiritual -- Learn to meditate They say there are only two things in life that are certain - death and taxes. Well, I say there's a third - stress. No matter how privileged your life may be, you will find yourself under stress. There are too many things outside your control that cause stress -- the weather, politics, terrorism, asteroids, diseases, you name it. The best way to deal with all this stress is to know how to calm and center your mind, and the best way to do that is with a daily meditation practice. 4) Social -- Live in SF or NYC & Travel Two things I'd highly recommend that you do by age 30 are 1) live in a cosmopolitan city like New York City, San Francisco, Paris, Rome, etc, and 2) travel as much as you can. Both things will help you understand other cultures, types of food, belief systems, and Continue reading >>

Why Is There An Increased Rate Of Heart Disease?

Why Is There An Increased Rate Of Heart Disease?

Diabetes puts you at risk of heart disease (even if you have ‘normal’ looking cholesterol and no symptoms). This is because diabetes can change the chemical makeup of some of the substances found in the blood and this can cause blood vessels to narrow or to clog up completely. Heart attacks and strokes are up to four times more likely in people with diabetes For this reason, often people with diabetes are on blood pressure lowering medications, often in combination Maintaining fitness with regular physical activity combined with some weight loss can help reduce high blood pressure Diabetes can change the chemical makeup of some of the substances found in the blood and this can cause blood vessels to narrow or to clog up completely. Maintaining fitness with regular physical activity combined with some weight loss can help reduce high blood pressure. Blood pressure lowering medications are often required for people who have diabetes. Symptoms Often people do not know they have heart disease until they develop symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness or excessive fatigue when walking or exercising. It is important to note that symptoms may be mild to severe and sometimes there may be none at all. Examples of some other warning symptoms may be: Arm or jaw discomfort Indigestion Weakness Nausea. If you think you are having a heart attack, phone 000 IMMEDIATELY. How can I reduce the risk? One of the most important things to do to reduce the risk of heart disease is to meet with your doctor and/or Credentialled Diabetes Educator to discuss your individual risk factors and how to reduce them. In general terms you can reduce the risk by: Being physically active Losing weight if you are overweight Not smoking Managing blood fats Managing high blood pressure Ta Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease Risk Are Linked By The Same Genes, Scientists Say

Diabetes And Heart Disease Risk Are Linked By The Same Genes, Scientists Say

Global health officials are grappling with epidemics of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease and now a major study is warning that a genetic connection may be at play linking the two chronic diseases. Scientists out of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Medicine say that they’ve uncovered 16 new genetic risk factors for diabetes along with one new genetic risk factor for heart disease, shedding light on the onset of the two ailments. The medical community is already saying that diabetes is a risk factor for heart disease but they’ve never really understood the biological pathways tying the two together. READ MORE: What Alzheimer’s disease, heart health and diabetes have in common Now, they’re suggesting that genes known to be tied to a higher diabetes risk are also linked to a higher risk of heart disease. In eight of the 16 genes they zeroed in on, they found a specific gene variant that tampers with risk for both conditions. What could these findings mean? The scientists say it could pave the way to treating both of the chronic diseases at the same time. “Identifying gene variants linked to both Type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease risk, in principle, opens up opportunities to lower the risk of both outcomes with a single drug,” study co-author, Dr. Danish Saleheen, said in a university statement. “Using evidence from human genetics, it should be possible to design drugs for Type 2 diabetes that have either beneficial or neutral effects on coronary heart disease risk,” Saleheen said. READ MORE: Stroke more than doubles risk of dementia, Heart and Stroke Foundation warns Saleheen’s team pored over the genetic data for more than 250,000 people from South Asian, East Asian and European descent. With the data in tow, they found the 16 new ge Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: A Major Risk Factor For Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes Mellitus: A Major Risk Factor For Cardiovascular Disease

Abundant evidence shows that patients with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are at high risk for several cardiovascular disorders: coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, cardiomyopathy, and congestive heart failure. Cardiovascular complications are now the leading causes of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. The public health impact of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with diabetes is already enormous and is increasing. Several explanations are behind this increase. First, the incidence of diabetes rises with advancing age, and the number of older people in the United States is growing rapidly. Second, insulin treatment for persons with type 1 diabetes has prolonged their lives significantly, and with each year of additional life comes an increased risk for CVD complications. Third, type 2 diabetes occurs at an earlier age in obese and overweight persons, and the prevalence of obesity is rising in the United States. The risk for diabetes in overweight persons is heightened by physical inactivity; unfortunately, the majority of Americans engage in little regular or sustained physical activity. Fourth, the populations that are particularly susceptible to diabetes—African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Asians—are growing in this country. Fifth, improved medical care, particularly when extended to susceptible populations, will bring an increasing number of patients with type 2 diabetes into the medical care system. All of these factors will lead to an absolute increase in the number of patients who will require medical intervention to prevent the complications of diabetes. Diabetes has long been recognized to be an independent risk factor for CVD. Prospective studies, such as the Framingham, Honolulu Continue reading >>

Biological Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Found

Biological Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Found

Researchers from the UC Davis Health System have discovered a biological link between diabetes and heart disease, which may explain why diabetes sufferers have an increased risk for heart disease. This is according to a study published in the journal Nature. The researchers found that when blood sugars are abnormally high (hyperglycemia), this activates a biological pathway that causes irregular heartbeats - a condition called cardiac arrhythmia - that is linked to heart failure and sudden cardiac death. According to the World Heart Federation, people who suffer from diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, compared with people who do not have diabetes. The American Heart Association says that around 65% of diabetes sufferers die from heart disease or stroke, emphasizing the need for new research looking at links between the conditions. For this study, UC Davis researchers, alongside collaborators at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, conducted a series of experiments to determine any biological reasons as to why diabetes sufferers are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. O-GlcNAc-modified CaMKII a trigger of arrhythmias The experiments involved detailed molecular analysis in rat and human proteins and tissues, calcium imaging in isolated rat cardiac myocytes (cells found in muscle tissues) that were exposed to high glucose, as well looking at whole heart arrhythmias with optical mapping within isolated hearts and live diabetic rates. Their findings showed that moderate to high blood glucose levels, similar to those found in diabetics, triggered a sugar molecule called O-GlcNAc (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) in heart muscle cells to bind to a specific site on a protein called CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent pr Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The diabetes–heart disease connection and what it means for you Understand the interactions between these two conditions. Photo: Thinkstock Exercise and a heart-healty diet lowers risks from both heart disease and diabetes. Decades ago, data from the historic Framingham Heart Study revealed that having diabetes significantly increases your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In the intervening years, scientists have learned more about how the two deadly diseases interact. But the magnitude of the problem has expanded as well. Currently, two-thirds of people with diabetes eventually die of heart disease or stroke. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

By By Om P. Ganda, M.D., Director, Lipid Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center A strong link between diabetes and heart disease is now well established. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center several years ago showed a two- to threefold increase in the incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared with those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack or stroke is by far the leading cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations. Several advances in the treatment of heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so has the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival has been less than half as much as in the general population. Why Is Heart Disease So Common in People With Diabetes? Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease; however, a variety of mechanisms—not solely blood glucose levels—most likely come into play. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to other well-established risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and more than 90% of patients with diabetes have one or more of these additional risk factors. Some of the increased susceptibility to blood vessel damage that people with diabe Continue reading >>

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering: Nearly two-thirds of people with diabetes have high blood pressure, and, according to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke than people who don't have the condition. The good news: Learning more about the link between heart disease and diabetes can help you take steps to help protect your heart and manage your diabetes. How Diabetes and Heart Disease Are Related The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. Over time, the high glucose in the bloodstream can damage the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels, a condition known as atherosclerosis. This can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Other heart facts to consider: People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. Heart disease that leads to heart attack or stroke is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes. A person who has diabetes has the same risk of heart attack as someone who is not diabetic, but already had a heart attack. Protecting Your Heart When You Have Diabetes If you believe you are at a higher risk for heart disease, don’t despair. There are several small lifestyle changes you can make to not only help prevent heart disease, but also manage your diabetes more effectively. Be active. The American Heart Association recomme Continue reading >>

Congestive Heart Failure (chf)

Congestive Heart Failure (chf)

A type of heart disease in which the heart no longer pumps sufficient blood to meet the body’s needs. Diabetes is a risk factor for heart failure, but a number of measures, including tight blood glucose control, can greatly reduce this risk. The heart is essentially a muscular pump that circulates about 2,000 gallons of blood throughout the body every day. It has four chambers: two upper chambers called atria, which receive blood, and two lower chambers called ventricles, which pump blood out. The chambers are separated by four heart valves that open and close in such a way that blood flows only in the proper direction. Each heartbeat involves a series of expansions and contractions of the heart muscle, as the heart receives oxygen-depleted blood from the body, sends it to the lungs to release carbon dioxide and receive oxygen, and delivers the oxygen-rich blood to the heart and the rest of the body. A healthy heart adjusts its output of blood based on the body’s changing needs, pumping more blood when a person is active and less blood when he is at rest. In congestive heart failure, the heart does not actually stop beating, but one or both of the ventricles become weak and unable to pump vigorously. As blood flow slows down, blood and fluid build up, or congest, in parts of the body. If the left ventricle is not pumping properly, blood and fluid collect in the lungs or heart; if the right ventricle is weak, fluid builds up in the legs and feet. If CHF continues untreated, the heart muscle may thicken or enlarge to compensate for its diminished pumping capacity, a change that further weakens the heart muscle. Heart failure usually develops gradually over many years, most often as the result of underlying coronary artery disease, damage to the heart muscle from a pre Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: One Treatment For Both Could Be On Horizon

Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: One Treatment For Both Could Be On Horizon

Scientists have discovered the conditions are linked by the same genes which could offer hope of combating them with the same drug. Researchers analysed the complete DNA of more than 250,000 people and found seven mutations that increased the risk for heart disease and diabetes. It could help explain why diabetics are 65 and 48 per cent more likely to suffer heart failure or a heart attack, respectively. "Identifying these gene variants linked to both type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease risk in principle opens up opportunities to lower the risk of both outcomes with a single drug,” said Professor Danish Saleheen, Epidemiologist at Pennsylvania University. The findings add to the basic scientific understanding of both major illnesses and point to potential targets for future drugs. Professor Saleheen said: "From a drug development perspective it would make sense to focus on those pathways that are most strongly linked to both diseases." Type 2 diabetes is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) but the reasons why are still fairly unclear. Coronary heart disease affects more than 2.3 million people in Britain and 69,000 die from heart attacks every year as a result. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. There are an estimated 3.6 million Britons living with type 2 diabetes - a major cause of premature death. Professor Saleheen’s team analysed DNA data from participants of South Asian, East Asian or European descent, uncovered 16 new genetic variants associated with diabetes and one with heart disease. They then showed most known to increase the risk of one also increased the ri Continue reading >>

Diabetic Heart Disease

Diabetic Heart Disease

If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes you have an increased risk for heart disease. Diabetic heart disease can be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra weight around the waist Abnormal cholesterol levels High blood pressure Smoking Some people who have diabetic heart disease have no signs or symptoms of heart disease. Others have some or all of the symptoms of heart disease. Treatments include medications to treat heart damage or to lower your blood glucose (blood sugar), blood pressure, and cholesterol. If you are not already taking a low dose of aspirin every day, your doctor may suggest it. You also may need surgery or some other medical procedure. Lifestyle changes also help. These include a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, and quitting smoking. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Women, Diabetes, & Cardiovascular Disease

Women, Diabetes, & Cardiovascular Disease

As a woman with diabetes, you have plenty of company. About 13 million women have diabetes, that about one in 10 women over age 20—have diabetes. Other facts include: The average age of diagnosis for women is 55 years old Certain racial and ethnic groups are at higher risk for diabetes. These include African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Native Hawaiian-Pacific Islander, and Asian Americans. If you have diabetes, you probably know about the potential for eye and foot problems. But how much do you know about the most common complication of diabetes cardiovascular disease? The fact is, people with diabetes are up to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than are people who do not have diabetes. Overall, women with diabetes have a 31% risk of heart disease or stroke Unfortunately, about one-third of women with diabetes do not know they have the disease. For all these reasons, Cleveland Clinic experts in diabetes and heart disease recommend that every woman have her blood glucose tested, particularly those women with a family history of diabetes. When you know you have diabetes based on the results of a blood test, you can take steps to manage your condition and live a longer, healthier life. Diabetes is a disease of the pancreas. Situated behind the stomach, the pancreas is the organ responsible for producing the hormone insulin. After food is eaten, it is broken down into glucose, the simple sugar that is the main source of energy for the body's cells. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells where it is converted to energy. In diabetes, the pancreas either cannot produce enough insulin, cannot use insulin correctly or both. When insulin does not function properly, glucose cannot enter the cells. As a result, glucose levels in the blood increas Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Om P. Ganda, M.D., Director, Lipid Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School There is a clear-cut relationship between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center many years ago showed a two- to three-fold increased incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared to people without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared to those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease, (leading to heart attack and stroke), is by far the most frequent cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations. Several advances in treating heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so does the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival after a heart attack has been less than half as much as in the general population. Not Just One Risk Factor Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease, but most likely it is not just high blood glucose levels, but a variety of mechanisms that interact. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to such other well-established risk factors as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. More than 90 percent of patients have one or more of these additional risk factors. There is evidence that smoking hastens the Continue reading >>

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