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Hot Weather And High Blood Sugar

Heat And Type 1 Diabetes

Heat And Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here. Whether experiencing hot summer temperatures or a tropical vacation, it is important for everyone to beware of the heat – and the various effects that it can have on our bodies. Have you ever noticed your blood sugar either spiking or dropping rapidly in severe temperatures? Many people with Type 1 diabetes run into this issue and have been baffled as to why. Heat may have much more of an impact on your blood glucose levels than you realized! Keeping a close eye on your BG becomes even more important when in areas with higher temperatures. Here are some possible explanations to the heat’s role in blood sugar fluctuations, and some factors to keep in mind while enjoying your summer fun in the sun with Type 1! High blood sugar Heat can spike blood sugar levels easily if we are not properly hydrated. When the body is dehydrated, blood glucose becomes more concentrated due to the decrease in blood flow through the kidneys. This makes it much more difficult for the kidneys to remove any excess glucose from urine. How to fix it? Adjust insulin dosages as instructed by a medical professional, and most importantly drink plenty of water! Low blood sugar Blood glucose levels have been known to plummet in the heat – especially when combined with exercise. Why is this? Heat can cause the body’s blood vessels to expand, which in turn can speed up insulin absorption and potentially lead to hypoglycemia. This can be made worse when exercising due to the increased blood flow to certain areas, especially if insulin is injected in the legs. Also consider that hot tubs/jacuzzis or hot showers/baths can have the s Continue reading >>

Hot Summer Weather May Affect Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes

Hot Summer Weather May Affect Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes

Hot summer weather may affect individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes Exercise is a key component in diabetes management plans, and individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may be more likely to meet their physical activity goals during the summer months when there is plenty of opportunity to spend time outdoors. However, the hot weather may pose certain risks to individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. A recent article published by Fox-31 News Online reported that people with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may be more susceptible to dehydration than those who do not have the disease. The news provider explained that low blood sugar levels may accelerate the rate of dehydration, so it is important for diabetics to stay hydrated throughout the day. Checking your blood sugar is very important because with the extra energy that your body has to use to stay cool, your blood sugar may go down more than it normally would, said pediatrician Cathy Palmier, quoted by the news source. She noted that some individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes have an impaired ability to sweat, which may make them more likely to be affected by even moderate heat. Warm weather may also affect diabetes medications, the news organization stated. Temperatures above 86 degrees may cause abnormal interactions between ingredients in diabetes treatments, which may alter their efficacy. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes who require insulin should store their supplies at room temperature. Bottles of insulin that are not in use can be kept in the refrigerator, but they should be taken out long enough to warm up before they are put to use, the organization says. This is because chilled insulin m Continue reading >>

Can Hot Weather Affect Blood Sugar?

Can Hot Weather Affect Blood Sugar?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was just curios if weather had an affect on diabetics blood sugar Also is insulin as efficient when it's really hot as it is right now. Can't complain though I suppose! Shout out to all my fellow diabetic today, keep smiling Heya, yes the weather certainly does affect your blood glucose levels. I find I need less insulin as my body burns it up a lot quicker, whereas in the colder weather I need more. Take care with your insulin storage too, keep it somewhere cool Ahh very interesting, thanks for the information Heya, yes he weather certainly does affect your blood glucose levels. I find I need less insulin as my body burns it up a lot quicker, whereas in the colder weather I need more. Take care with your insulin storage too, keep it somewhere cool Definitely. I keep dropping low and my daughter has had a hypo nearly everyday this week due to warm weather. It's wonderful! We've gone the other way! Higher bloods and only 1 hypo in nearly 3 weeks. Hotter weather or end of the honey moon period, I'm not sure but things are looking up at the min Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app We've gone the other way! Higher bloods and only 1 hypo in nearly 3 weeks. Hotter weather or end of the honey moon period, I'm not sure but things are looking up at the min Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app Its a real Dilemma, i struggle to keep control of my blood sugars as it is! Perhaps closer monitoring of my BS will ensure the best possible outcome. On my last two fishing trips in hot conditions I noticed that my BS level went from 6.1(at 9.30am two hours after breakfast) to 8.2 at 12.30 before lunch and with no snacking between times. Yes my bgs Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In The Heat

Managing Diabetes In The Heat

How to keep your cool during the hottest time of year. Did you know that people who have diabetes—both type 1 and type 2—feel the heat more than people who don’t have diabetes? Some reasons why: Certain diabetes complications, such as damage to blood vessels and nerves, can affect your sweat glands so your body can’t cool as effectively. That can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke, which is a medical emergency. People with diabetes get dehydrated (lose too much water from their bodies) more quickly. Not drinking enough liquids can raise blood sugar, and high blood sugar can make you urinate more, causing dehydration. Some commonly used medicines like diuretics (“water pills” to treat high blood pressure) can dehydrate you, too. High temperatures can change how your body uses insulin. You may need to test your blood sugar more often and adjust your insulin dose and what you eat and drink. Drink plenty of water. Test your blood sugar often. Keep medicines, supplies, and equipment out of the heat. Stay inside in air-conditioning when it’s hottest. Wear loose, light clothing. Make a plan in case you lose power. Have a go-bag ready for emergencies. It’s the Heat and the Humidity Even when it doesn’t seem very hot outside, the combination of heat and humidity (moisture in the air) can be dangerous. When sweat evaporates (dries) on your skin, it removes heat and cools you. It’s harder to stay cool in high humidity because sweat can’t evaporate as well. Whether you’re working out or just hanging out, it’s a good idea to check the heat index—a measurement that combines temperature and humidity. Take steps to stay cool (see sidebar) when it reaches 80°F in the shade with 40% humidity or above. Important to know: The heat index can be up to 15°F Continue reading >>

Heat And Diabetes

Heat And Diabetes

Living with diabetes blog Diabetes research is turning up new information on diabetes and diabetes management all the time. In 2009, I wrote a blog about the effects of heat on blood glucose control if you have diabetes. I mentioned, then, that heat doesn't have a direct effect on your blood glucose, but that heat can lead to changes in your daily routine which, in turn, can affect your blood glucose. Later research, published in September 2010 by researchers at Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz., suggests, additionally, that some Arizonans with diabetes have considerable gaps in their "heat awareness." This lack of awareness led to actions such as waiting until temperatures were quite high (above 101 F, or 38.3 C) before taking precautions against the heat and leaving medications and supplies at home rather than risk exposing them to the heat — meaning not having the supplies to manage diabetes while away from home. Sweating is an important means of cooling the body in hot weather, and the ability to sweat can be affected in some people with diabetes. Other studies have shown an increase in emergency room visits, in those who have diabetes, when temperatures are high. Diabetes equipment and medications can also be affected by heat. Tips for managing diabetes in warm temperatures remain the same: Avoid sunburn, it can stress your body and can raise your blood glucose. Wear a good sunscreen, sunglasses and hat when out in the sun. Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. Carry a bottle of water with you on walks, etc. Exercise and do more strenuous activities in the early or later hours of the day when the temperatures are cooler and the sun is not at its peak. Check blood sugar levels frequently, since they may fluctuate. Remember, extreme temperature changes can have Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

We often look forward to changes of season, but if you have diabetes , you need to be extra careful when temperatures climb dramatically. Extreme heat can affect your blood sugar control. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If you use insulin or if your treatment of blood sugars is inadequate, this can put you at higher risk. Often, worsening blood sugar control is the main concern. Depending on the situation and your level of physical activity, low blood sugars are also possible. Extreme temperatures can also damage your medications and testing equipment. I always remind my patients to take precautions to protect themselves and their supplies during both winter and summer. If a patient’s blood sugars are mostly higher than 250 mg/dl, I recommend improving blood sugar control before engaging in heavy physical activity — regardless of the climate and the temperature, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. The extreme heat of summer affects blood sugar levels. How the heat affects your levels depends on what you’ve eaten, whether you’re well-hydrated and your activity level. If the heat and your activity make you sweat profusely, you may become dehydrated, leading to a rise in glucose levels. If you become dehydrated, your blood glucose levels will rise. This can lead to frequent urination, which then leads to further dehydration and even higher blood sugar levels — a kind of vicious cycle. Further, if the treatment includes insulin, dehydration reduces blood supply to the skin and, therefore, less absorption of injected insulin dosage. Most types of insulin can tolerate temperatures from 93 degrees F to 95 d Continue reading >>

How Hot Weather Can Affect Your Diabetes Management

How Hot Weather Can Affect Your Diabetes Management

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. As temperatures soar, so do blood sugar levels of many people with diabetes, while others saw their blood sugar levels drop. How is that possible, and what can we do to protect ourselves? First of all, we need to understand that excessive heat or cold puts a strain on the body. The body often goes into a flight-or-fight mode under stress, releasing hormones such as adrenalin and cortisol. These survival hormones cause the liver to release more glucose for energy, which can result in higher-than-normal blood sugars. To make it more confusing, low blood sugars can also occur during weather extremes as your body utilizes more energy to stay warm or tries to cool down. This can seem very complicated as we try to enjoy our vacations and maintain good blood sugar control. What you need to remember is that where your blood sugar takes you is dependent on other factors, such as hydration, exercise, and what you eat. Hydration is probably the single most important element to help us stay healthy outdoors. Clear fluids such as water are best, and have Gatorade or another electrolyte beverage handy if you are sweating excessively. Anyone with diabetes is especially prone to dehydration, which can become dangerous if left unchecked. Dehydration can also cause confusion, which may make a person unaware of a low blood sugar. The key piece of advice I can give you is to stay well hydrated and test blood sugars more frequently while outdoors. Als Continue reading >>

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Back to Living Better Many diabetics are aware stress and illness can cause blood sugar fluctuations, but did you know changes in temperatures can affect blood sugar levels and lead to false readings? Sabrina Rene, M.D., an endocrinologist at Piedmont, explains how temperature can produce blood sugar highs and lows, and how they can affect diabetes testing supplies. Effects of warm weather on diabetics During warmer months, it is especially important for diabetics to stay properly hydrated. Dehydration can cause blood sugar to rise as the glucose in your blood becomes more concentrated. High temperatures can also cause blood vessels to dilate, which can enhance insulin absorption, potentially leading to low blood sugar. It is best for diabetics to stay indoors during the hottest part of the day and monitor blood sugar closely for changes when temperatures start to rise. Ideal storage temperature for diabetic testing supplies Extreme heat and cold can affect insulin, test strips and glucose monitors. Never leave these supplies in a car, no matter what time of year. The meter should also be stored and used in a room that remains between 50 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Dr. Rene says it is important to store test strips in a dry, cool place. “You never want to store test strips in your bathroom. The warm, humid atmosphere can damage the strips, causing them to produce false readings,” she says. Vascular problems and temperature changes Patients with vascular problems often do not have proper blood flow, especially to their extremities, and cold weather may exacerbate slow blood flow. Diabetes test strips need a certain level of oxygen and blood flow to accurately calculate the glucose level. The lower these are, the less accurate the reading, says Dr. Rene. Raynaud’s p Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hot Weather: Be Extra Careful

Diabetes And Hot Weather: Be Extra Careful

For people with diabetes, particularly those taking medications and/or insulin, the Center for Disease Control’s Division of Diabetes Translation has prepared a list of precautions during hot weather: Heat can affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels and also increase the absorption of some fast-acting insulin, meaning you will need to test your blood glucose more often and perhaps adjust your intake of insulin, food, and liquids. Drink plenty of fluids, especially water, to avoid dehydration. Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages such as sweet tea and sodas. If your doctor has limited how much liquid you can drink, ask what to do during times of high heat. Check package inserts with medications to learn when high temperatures can affect them. Take medications with you if you will need to take them while you’re away from home, and protect them from the heat. If you’re traveling with insulin, don’t store it in direct sunlight or in a hot car. Keep it in a cooler, but do not place it directly on ice or on a gel pack. Check glucose meter and test strip packages for information on use during times of high heat and humidity. Do not leave them in a hot car, by a pool, or on the beach. Heat can damage insulin pumps and other equipment. Do not leave the disconnected pump or supplies in the direct sun. Get physical activity in air-conditioned areas, or exercise outside early or late in the day, during cooler temperatures. Use your air conditioner or go to air-conditioned buildings in your community. A beautiful sunny day is the ultimate motivation to go outside and play, but the summer heat and exercise can be a risky combination. Get 12 Tips For Summer Exercise Take life to the next level, and be all that you can be. That's what a vacation at Pritikin is all about. Live bette Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

To date, 2016 has been the hottest year ever, and it’s getting hotter. From now on, coping with heat will be an important part of managing diabetes. Some knowledge that might help you: 1. High body temperatures can lower blood sugar. Mayo Clinic writers Nancy Klobassa Davidson, RN, and Peggy Moreland, RN, CDE, say you should check your sugars more often in the hot weather. 2. Sunburn can raise blood sugar. The Mayo Clinic advises wearing a good sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat while out in the sun. 3. Warm skin absorbs insulin faster, while dehydrated skin absorbs insulin more slowly. The closer you can keep your injection site to normal temperature and hydration, the better. 4. Dehydration from sweating can raise blood sugar and can lead to heat exhaustion. According to the Cleveland Clinic, people with diabetes are more likely than others to be admitted to hospitals for dehydration and heat exhaustion, and to die from it. High glucose levels lead to urinating more, which increases risk for dehydration. This may be especially true if you’re on an SGLT-2 inhibitor drug. Keep drinking water with a bit of salt if you are blessed to live in an area where water is available. Have a bottle with you and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Learn to check yourself for dehydration by pinching up some skin on your arm and letting it go. It should snap right back into place. If it goes more slowly, you are getting dehydrated. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine in super-hot weather, as they are dehydrating. 5. Heat can damage insulin, other medications, and test strips. The Joslin Clinic advises people to keep their insulin cool, but not on ice. If you take medicines with you while you’re away from home, get a cooler bag to keep your medicines and test strips in. Ext Continue reading >>

Ask The Expert: Summer Heat And Diabetes Control

Ask The Expert: Summer Heat And Diabetes Control

Question: How can the summer heat affect diabetes control? Heat, especially extreme heat, is hard for anyone to tolerate. It’s especially hard on people with diabetes. When your body is exposed to heat, you lose more water through sweat, which can dehydrate you. Dehydration increases blood sugar levels. High blood sugar will make you urinate more often, which can dehydrate you even more. To stay hydrated, drink more fluids. You can tell when you’re drinking enough because your urine will be lighter-colored. Heat can affect the way your body absorbs insulin. In hot weather, more blood flows to your skin. When you’re dehydrated, the opposite happens -- less blood flows to the skin. Most types of insulin, especially short-acting insulin, don’t work as well when blood flow is decreased. The heat can affect your medicines. If you leave insulin in a hot car, it will start to degrade. Bring along a cooler to keep insulin at room temperature or below. Heat can also damage test strips, leading to false readings. That’s going to affect your blood sugar management and how much insulin you take. Be careful when you exercise in the heat. Watch for both high and low blood sugar. Your blood sugar can drop if you are on a medication that could cause low blood sugar. Being outside in hot weather and exercising produce similar symptoms, such as sweating and a fast heart rate, so it’s easy to overlook the early symptoms of low blood sugar. That’s why you need to check your blood sugar every hour or two while you exercise. Bring juice, glucose tablets, or glucose gel along for your workout, in case your blood sugar dips. If you take insulin, ask your [doctor] how to adjust your dosage when exercising. Avoid sunburn. It damages your skin and can affect diabetes control. A seri Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heat: The Impact Of Hot Weather On Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes And Heat: The Impact Of Hot Weather On Diabetes Symptoms

Know the Dangers of Heat and Humidity and How to Avoid Them Living with diabetes, you likely know how to manage your symptoms most of the time, but you may not realize just how much diabetes and heat interact. While some people might be able to brave the beach all day until the sun dips down, that can be a recipe for disaster for anyone with a blood sugar disorder after all, heat and humidity affect your metabolism, and can throw your carefully concocted diabetes management plan out of whack. The first step to a safer and happier summer season is a better understanding of how diabetes and temperature interacton hot days. Take some time to learn exactly what diabetic challenges you may face, so you can prepare and protect yourself when the temperature rises. Studies show that visits to the emergency room and hospitalizations go way up for diabetics during the hottest times of the year, and thats not always traced to careless behaviour. Some people simply dont realize how much they need to change their routine when the temperature soars. Diabetes impairs your ability to sweat, and since sweat is your bodys natural cooling system, you can get overheated a lot quicker than your neighbor. Blood sugar can be more difficult to control as your body tries to adapt to the rising temperature, too, which sets the stage for uncomfortable hypo- or hyperglycemic episodes. Some specific risks to keep in mind include: Dehydration. Dehydration is a risk for everyone, but it can affect diabetics much more severely. The problem is that less blood flows through your kidneys, which leaves a higher concentration of glucose in your blood and cause you to urinate more, leading to further dehydration, higher blood sugar, and eventually, hyperglycemic emergency. Hypoglycemia. Hot and humid weath Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

Summer Heat Is A Risk To Diabetes Patients

Summer Heat Is A Risk To Diabetes Patients

The results weren't all bad. "Most patients incorporated appropriate personal protective measures such as staying indoors, drinking additional fluids on schedule, applying sunscreen, and wearing protective clothing," says Adrienne A. Nassar, MD, a third year resident at Mayo Clinic Arizona, who presented the findings at ENDO 2010 in San Diego, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society. But the respondents fell short in other ways. For instance, one in five waited until temperatures were over 100 degrees before taking precautions, Nassar said at a news conference And 23% began drinking fluids when they got thirsty -- typically too late to prevent dehydration effectively. Many left their medications and monitoring equipment at home during a heat wave. Nassar and her colleagues analyzed responses of 152 people with diabetes living in Phoenix, where the average July temperature is 107 F. On average, the patients were 64 years old, 85% had type 2 diabetes, and 77% were on insulin injections or pumps. Their blood glucose test results on the hemoglobin A1c tests were on average 7.9%, although the goal for those with diabetes is 7%. While many respondents protected their medication in the heat by carrying it in a cooler, 37% left medication or supplies at home. "This is quite concerning,'' Nassar says, "because they would not have the means to check their blood sugar" if they became faint, for instance. While most respondents, 72%, knew about the effect of heat on insulin, just 40% said they had gotten information from their health care providers about the ill effects of high temperature on oral medications, 41% on glucose monitors, and 38% on glucose monitoring strips. The point at which respondents said they would take protective measures varies. Nassar can't pinpoint an ex Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hot Weather - Staying Safe In The Heat

Diabetes And Hot Weather - Staying Safe In The Heat

Diabetes and Hot Weather - Staying Safe in the Heat There are hypo and hyper risks in hot weather Whether you are going on holiday or simply spending some time outdoors in the heat, high temperatures and the close humidity currently sweeping the UK do have an influence for people with long term conditions such as diabetes. This may partly be explained by increased activity in hot weather, but there is no doubt that the heat does affect some people with diabetes in other ways. What problems can hot weather cause for people with diabetes? Dehydration can be an issue in hot weather, and higher blood glucose levels can further increase this risk. People with diabetes may need to increase their intake of fluids in hot weather, drinking water regularly through the day. One of the major concerns regarding diabetes and hot weather is the risk of blood sugar levels rising or falling and causing hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia . What are the hypo risks from hot weather? Hot weather can increase the risk of hypoglycemia for those on blood glucose lowering medication. The Joslin Diabetes Centre notes that the bodys metabolism is higher in hot and humid weather which can lead to an increased chance of hypoglycemia. Hypos may be slightly harder to spot in hot weather. Dont be tempted to disregard hypo symptoms , such as sweating and tiredness, as a result of hot weather as it could be a sign of hypoglycemia. Take extra care when driving and test your blood sugar before and after each journey and stop regularly to check your blood sugar if taking longer journeys. To prevent hypos, be prepared to test your blood glucose more often, particularly if taking part in physical activity in hot weather. Keep a source of fasting carbohydrate, such as glucose tablets, to hand. To help treat hypos Continue reading >>

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