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Hot Dogs And Diabetes

Best And Worst Hot Dogs

Best And Worst Hot Dogs

With lots of hot dogs out there, it should be easy to choose a relatively healthy one, right? Not necessarily. Even "healthier" hot dogs may not be better for you, says Carolyn Brown, a registered dietitian and nutritionist at Foodtrainers, in New York City. "It comes down to the quality of the meat, the processing, and the other added ingredients." Brown recommends hot dogs with less than 150 calories and fewer than 14 grams of fat (with no more than 6 grams saturated). Sodium should not exceed 450 milligrams. Here's our list of the bestand worsthot dogs. Applegate Farms' the Great Organic Uncured Beef Hot Dog meets and beats Brown's criteria, with 110 calories, 8 grams of fat (3 grams saturated), 7 grams of protein, and just 330 milligrams of sodium. It's also made from organic, grass-fed beef. "Organic meat has never been given antibiotics or hormones, so it's always the way to go if you have the option," she says. "Grass-fed is even better; meat from a grass-fed animal doesn't have as much total or saturated fat as regular grain-fed." Ball Park Franks lead the lineup in sodium, calories, and fat, with 550 milligrams of sodium, 190 calories, 16 grams of fat (7 saturated), and 9 grams of protein. What's more, they're cured, meaning they have been treated with nitrates and nitrites, which have been linked to cancer and other health problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration limits the nitrate and nitrite content of food products, including hot dogs, but there are tasty uncured dogs available. If you like the idea of a low-cal, low-fat hot dog with plenty of protein, chicken dogs can be a great choice. You won't find any mystery meat in Trader Joe's Uncured Chicken Hot Dogsjust boneless, skinless chicken breasts and thighs. These dogs also contain flavorings like Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Meat (1 ounce = 7 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbohydrate, fat varies) One ounce of meat is about the size of your thumb; 3 ounces is the size of a deck of cards. No more thant 3 ounces of protein at a meal is recommended. (Try to eat meats from this page only; unfortunately, this means nothing fried.) Very Lean Meat Choices (0-1g fat/ounce and 35 calories) Poultry: Chicken or turkey (white meat, no skin), Cornish hen (no skin). Fish: Fresh or frozen cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, trout, lox, tuna fresh or canned in water. Shellfish: Clams, crab, lobster, scallops, shrimp. Game: Duck or pheasant (no skin), venison, buffalo, ostrich. Cheese: Fat-free (less than 1 gram of fat/ounce), low fat cottage cheese. Other: Processed sandwich meats with less than 1 gram fat or less/ounce, such as: deli thin, shaved meats chipped beef, turkey ham egg whites (2) egg substitutes, plain hot dogs, fat free sausage, fat free or less than 1 gram fat/ounce Lean Meat Choices (3g fat/ounce and 55 calories) Beef: USDA Select or Choice grades trimmed of fat such as round, sirloin, flank steak, tenderloin, roast (rib, chuck, rump); steak (T-bone, porter house, cubed); ground round. Pork: Lean pork such as fresh ham, canned, cured, or boiled ham, Canadian bacon, tenderloin, center loin chop. Lamb: Roast, chop or leg. Veal: Leap chop, roast. Poultry: Chicken, turkey (dark meat, no skin), chicken (white meat, with skin), domestic duck or goose (well-drained of fat, no skin). Fish: Herring (uncreamed or smoked), Oysters, Salmon (fresh or canned), catfish, Sardines (canned), tuna (canned in oil, drained). Game: Goose (no skin, rabbit). Cheese: 4.5% fat cottage cheese, grated parmesan, cheeses with 3 grams of fat or less/ounce. Other: Hot dogs with 3 grams of fat or less per ounce. Processed sand Continue reading >>

Craving A Hotdog | Diabetic Connect

Craving A Hotdog | Diabetic Connect

Ok I never want hotdogs. But today I had this really bad craving for one. I bought turkey hotdogs 1 gram of carb and found that a 6 inch tortilla has 27 grams of carbs for 2, hot dog buns have 27 grams of carbs for 1. So I had 2 hot dogs with lettuce and cheese on 2 flour tortillas, 31 grams of carbs and was satisfied. You know there are not any bad foods good for you just keep in mind you are alive and as long as you are focused and have controll you can eat any food you like. IN MODERATION of course. LIVE sounds like me tates good this have you ever tried wrapping them in cresent rolls befor good that way to something different That would be too many carbs for me. I sometimes will have a hot dog with sauerkraut and mustard on a plate no bread. If I need to have a wrap, I use a low carb one. I found some that are about 4-5 net carbs per serving. One was 7 grams net carbs but they were big so I cut them in half. Worked pretty good. how many carbs are you allowed? I am supposed to eat around 30carbs, 5-6 times a day or every 2 to 2 1/2 hours. ( ok I am bad and skip many of them :) ) When diagnosed my A1C was 14.1 and fasting blood sugar was 366. I stopped eating high carb starchy foods like bread and most foods made of grains along with pasta, rice, corn, potatoes, oatmeal, cereals, chips, crackers, cakes, cookies, candy, soda, fruits, fruit juices, milk and most foods that contain more than 5-6 net carbs per serving as found on the package label. Four months later my A1C was 5.9 and blood sugar reading were almost at normal numbers. Even was able to quit meds and control on diet only. I found that drinking 8+ glasses of water and eating lots of low carb vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, cucumbers, spinach, pickles and sauerkraut helped a lot with me getti Continue reading >>

Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk

Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk

Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk : The Salt A fresh study looks at what happens after people change their meat-eating habits. Those who upped their intake about 3.5 servings more per week saw their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes during four years of follow-up increase by almost 50 percent. Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk Delicious in moderation, folks. Randy Bayne/Flicker Creative Commons hide caption You've likely heard about the link between sugar consumption and Type 2 diabetes . But fresh research ties another dietary pattern to increased risk of the disease, too: eating too much red meat. It's not that we are trying to pick on meat (I'm a meat-eater, in moderation), but the recent studies linking carnivorous habits to health problems seem to be piling up. We've had Salami Suicide and Death By Bacon . Now, there's a study that links red meat consumption to an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. The researchers tracked what happens after people changed their meat-eating habits, using data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and the Nurses' Health Study, which include about 100,000 people. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaires. "Some people [in the study] increased their red meat consumption and other people decreased their consumption," says Dr. Frank Hu of the Harvard School of Public Health, one of the co-authors of the paper, which appears in JAMA Internal Medicine. The study found that among those who started eating more red meat, about 3.5 servings more per week, the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes during four years of follow-up increased by almost 50 perce Continue reading >>

Hot Dogs, Without The Guilt | Berkeley Wellness

Hot Dogs, Without The Guilt | Berkeley Wellness

What would summer be like without hot dogs grilling on the barbecue or in hand at a ball game? Yet with all the bad news about processed meats, its hard to enjoy a hot dog these days without guilt. Hot dog sales are down, though one can hardly say that popular alternatives at the ballpark (cheesy nachos come to mind) are healthier. Is it possible to choose a healthier hot dog? With a little effort, yes. Most processed meats, including most hot dogs, are cured with salt, smoke, or nitrites to inhibit bacterial growth. Nitrates also give the meats a characteristic flavor and pink color. In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a report stating that processed meat should be listed as a human carcinogen because observational studies indicate that nitrates are linked with colorectal cancer and possibly stomach cancer . The American Institute of Cancer Research puts processed meats in its "never eat" category , except for special occasions. It cites on its website three ways in which eating processed meats might increase the risk of colorectal cancer: The nitrates/nitrites used in processed meats Smoking the meats or cooking them at high temperatures (such as grilling), both of which can produce potentially carcinogenic chemicals, such as heterocyclic aromatic amines and N-nitroso compounds Heme iron, the type of iron found in red meat Eating processed meats has also been linked with heart disease and type 2 diabetes. A meta-analysis published in 2015 in the British Journal of Nutrition found that people who ate the largest amounts of processed meat had significantly higher rates of death from cardiovascular disease as well as from other causes. In another meta-analysis published in Circulation in 2010, Harvard researchers found that each daily serving of proces Continue reading >>

Study: Hot Dogs, Bacon Pose Big Health Risk

Study: Hot Dogs, Bacon Pose Big Health Risk

Study: Hot Dogs, Bacon Pose Big Health Risk If you had a hunch eating bacon, sausage and hot dogs wasn't good for you, there's research to back you up. Processed meats can increase the risk of heart disease by 42 percent and diabetes by 19 percent, U.S. researchers said Monday in the latest study on dietary health risks. However, unprocessed lamb, pork or beef did not increase those health risks, according to a Reuters report , suggesting that increased salt and chemical preservatives of processed foods may be the real culprits. The study, which was an analysis of other research, didn't look into meat's role in developing high blood pressure or cancer. "To lower risk of heart attacks and diabetes, people should consider which types of meats they are eating," said Renata Micha of the Harvard School of Public Health, who authored the study. "Processed meats such as bacon, salami, sausages, hot dogs and processed deli meats may be the most important to avoid," Micha said in a statement. The study, which appeared in the journal Circulation , was questioned by the American Meat Institute . "At best, this hypothesis merits further study. It is certainly no reason for dietary changes," James Hodges, the organization's president, said in a statement. Micha and her colleagues reviewed around 1,600 separate studies to investigate the differences in health risks between processed and unprocessed red meat. Processed foods were any that were smoked, cured, salted or had chemical preservatives added, including bacon, salami, hot dogs, sausages or processed deli meats. The evidence suggested that on average, each 1.8 oz serving of processed meat - the equivalent of one hot dog - was linked to higher risks of heart disease and diabetes. Continue reading >>

To Dodge Diabetes, Go Light On The Hot Dogs And Bacon

To Dodge Diabetes, Go Light On The Hot Dogs And Bacon

To Dodge Diabetes, Go Light On The Hot Dogs And Bacon To Dodge Diabetes, Go Light On The Hot Dogs And Bacon Meat preservatives like nitrites and sodium have been linked to insulin resistance, which might explain the link between Type 2 diabetes and high consumption of these meats, researchers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption Meat preservatives like nitrites and sodium have been linked to insulin resistance, which might explain the link between Type 2 diabetes and high consumption of these meats, researchers say. Let's begin with some well-worn advice: Moderation is key. So go ahead and eat that hot dog at the state fair or some bacon on vacation. But take note: People who eat lots of processed meats over their lifetime seem to have a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes (and heart disease ). How much higher? A study by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health analyzed food questionnaire responses from more than 400,000 participants. They found that people who ate the most red meat on average a daily serving of 100 grams, about the size of deck of cards were 20 percent more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes compared to those who ate the least amount of meat. Even after adjusting for other risk factors such as weight and lifestyle, the finding held up. The risk of diabetes doubled for people who ate a lot of processed meats, such as hot dogs, deli meat and bacon, which tend to be high in salt and nitrites. But the authors found that replacing a daily serving of red meat with alternative sources of protein such as low fat dairy, nuts or whole grains reduced the risk of Type 2 diabetes also by about 20 percent. Their results are published online today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. But the meat industry isn't so sure about the link between m Continue reading >>

Lourdes Health System - Health Talk Online - Lourdes Cares About You - Mind, Body And Spirit.

Lourdes Health System - Health Talk Online - Lourdes Cares About You - Mind, Body And Spirit.

Skip the Hot Dogs, Pass on the Bacon to Lower Your Risk for Diabetes It should come as no surprise that hot dogs, bacon and cold cuts don't exactly count as health foods. But new research further confirms how bad processed meats may be. A study of more than 400,000 people published in the October issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that eating just one hot dog or two bacon slices a day increased the risk of developing type 2 diabetes a whopping 51 percent. At the same time, eating 3 ounces (about the size of a deck of cards) daily of unprocessed red meat like ground beef or pork raised your risk 19 percent. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods we eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps your cells use the glucose for energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin , the glucose stays in your blood. Having too much sugar in your blood can damage your eyes, kidneys and nerves, as well as lead to heart disease and stroke , said Lourdes Medical Associates endocrinologist Parveen Verma, DO, FACE. Virtually unknown a century ago, diabetes now affects 25.8 million Americans. Another 79 million people have prediabetes-blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough yet to be considered diabetes. "Many people associate diabetes with foods that are high in carbohydrates and sugar," explained Dr. Verma. "Hot dogs do have a lot of carbohydrates, which can raise your blood sugar, and they are high in sodium and saturated fat, which increase your blood pressure and cholesterol. "But they also contain nitrates and nitrites, preservatives and additive Continue reading >>

Hot Dog Carbs!! - Carbohydrate And Calories - Diabetes Forums

Hot Dog Carbs!! - Carbohydrate And Calories - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Who can tell me how many carbs are in a hot dog? I came home tonight and my wife and I ate two Omaha Steak Company premium Hot Dogs. I ate mine on 2 slices of whole wheat bread that had 10 carbs each. I don't know how many carbs the hot dogs had...now I'm Worried. Hot dogs by themselves are low in carbohydrates. However, they are high in sodium. One regular hot dog has approximately 13.3 grams of fat, 5.3 grams of saturated fat, 24 mg cholesterol, 1.8 grams of carbs, 513 mg. of sodium. You'd have to read the hot dog package label ... most are low carb but some have fillers that boost the carb count. www dot omahasteaks dot com/gifs/NutritionAnalysis2007.pdf www dot omahasteaks dot com/gifs/NutritionAnalysis2007.pdf I checked my bg level 2 hrs after hot dogs and it was 196. I promise I won't do that again. Thanks for the domain for Omaha Steaks. One of the smartest moves I have made is the forum...Thanks Guys!!! Hot dogs and sausages vary WILDLY!!! you need to read the labels on these more than any other meat product. i have seen hot dogs with 10g carbs per dog and other things (like a Kransky) with 0g of carbs! Two slices of bread at 10 grams of carbs each could have a lot to do with that rise in blood glucose, as well. How many of those carbs were fiber? Hot dogs and sausages vary WILDLY!!! you need to read the labels on these more than any other meat product. i have seen hot dogs with 10g carbs per dog and other things (like a Kransky) with 0g of carbs! 10g per ... sounds like the "kiddie" hot dogs .. loaded with HFCS no doubt. Thought I would join for some support from others with the same Continue reading >>

Which Is Healthier: A Hot Dog Or Hamburger?

Which Is Healthier: A Hot Dog Or Hamburger?

Which is healthier: A hot dog or hamburger? Which is healthier: A hot dog or hamburger? Neither one is going to hit it out of the nutritional ballpark, but one of these barbecue favorites comes out on top. Both red and processed meats have been linked to diabetes and heart disease.Getty Images Baseball season has officially begun and if barbecue season hasnt kicked off in your region, it will soon enough. As you scan the stadium menu or what's sizzling on the grill, you may be wondering which of these all-American foods a hot dog or hamburger is the healthier option. The quick answer is that neither one of these picks is going to hit it out of the ballpark, nutritionally speaking. But, then again, few of us head to the ballpark or to a barbecue to eat a salad , so let's take a look at how both stack up. A typical frank is about 150 calories. Add the bun and some standard toppings (lets say, ketchup, mustard and relish, though I know much could be said about hot dog toppings), and all in, youre in the 300- to 350-calorie range. This is pretty tame as far as barbecue and stadium food goes. Processed meats are one of the very few foods that have been definitively linked to cancer. The thing is, hot dogs are highly processed and contain lots of sodium as well as nitrates, which are chemical compounds that are used to preserve processed and smoked meats. Though nutrition and medical experts may dispute the healthfulness of certain foods or nutrients, processed meats are one of the very few foods that have been definitively linked to cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies processed meat, like hot dogs, bacon, jerky and some deli meats, as a carcinogen meaning, they cause cancer. To repeat: They cause cancer; not might, or may, possibly, or any oth Continue reading >>

Ball Park Hot Dogs

Ball Park Hot Dogs

i found that ball park angus beef franks is low in carbs. At Trader Joes, I buy some made by Applegate Farm. They are organic, grass fed beef, no nitrates or preservatives, 0 carbs, 0 sugars, 8 fat and 7 protein. I think you can find that brand at other grocery stores, too. They are uncured. D.D. Family pre-diabetic for type 2 as of 3/08, no meds You also want to watch the salt content. Most hot dogs contain sodium nitrate which is not healthy, so try and limit the frequency of eating hot dogs and lunch meat. The hot dog Jeanne recommends from Trader Joes would be the exception. Mmmm. Applegate hot dogs are awesome. Once in awhile I get some for my kids and they are so happy to have them. I also found a turkey hotdog from oscar meyer with no nitrates or nitrites but my son didn't like them as much. Had that exact hotdog at my oldest granddaughters birthday party a couple of weekends ago. On a bun too along with some baked beans and potatoe salad. It was great. I skipped the cake though, it had way too much icing and I am not fond of the icing. We the willing, following the unknowing are doing the impossible. We have done so much for so long with so little that we are now able to do anything with nothing. Continue reading >>

The Happy Diabetic's Healthy Hot Dog Topping Recipes - Divabetic

The Happy Diabetic's Healthy Hot Dog Topping Recipes - Divabetic

Mr. Divabetic 08/10/2017 Food and Nutrition No Comments Chef Robert aka The Happy Diabetic takes part in our fourth annual Mr. Divabetic Mystery podcast: Gypsies, Tramps & Peasscheduled for Tuesday, September 12, 2017. This years diabetes mystery takes place in Coney Island, the home ofNathansFamous InternationalHot DogEatingContest. Joey Jaws Chestnut captured his 10th Mustard Belt by eating an event-record 72hot dogsand buns in 10 minutes to win. To get you in the spirit of Gypsies, Tramps & Peas we asked Chef Robert to share some recipes for healthy hot toppings to help you makeover your hot dog. Okay, let be honest the All American Hot dog gets a bad rap!, says Chef Robert Lewis.Its nutritional reputation is horrible. The average hot dog actually beats out a basic hamburger patty by about 100 calories assuming its not a foot long. After all, who really needs to eat a foot of food anyway! Chef Robert Lewis recommends choosing organic, grass-fed, and/or kosher all beef wieners, which tend to have less sodium.Aim for less than 200 calories, 5g sat fat, and 400 mg sodium. Dont worry, if youre feeling angry with Chef Robert for taking the fun out of grilling because hes got loads of surefire ways to make sure your dogs are the top dogs at your next cookout. After all, he was diagnosed in 1998 with type 2 diabetes. Much of what I heard in those early day was about the foods that were prohibited, says Chef Robert Lewis. I suspected that my days of good eating were over, yet as I worked through my ups and downs, I came to realize that the selection of foods I could and should eat was vast and included many of my favorites. This motivated me to attempt to create delicious, diabetic-friendly dishes that were also easy to prepare. The Happy Diabetic Fixins Tip: Replace relish Continue reading >>

Do Bacon And Hot Dogs Trigger Diabetes?

Do Bacon And Hot Dogs Trigger Diabetes?

Study Shows Processed and Red Meats Increase Risk Sept. 8, 2004 -- Eating more bacon and red meat than ever? You may be increasing your risk of developing diabetes , a new study shows. The long-term safety of meat-heavy diets has been questioned, with some studies linking them to kidney damage and colorectal cancer . Now new research points to a link between eating red meat -- especially processed meats -- and type 2 diabetes . Compared with women who eat less red meat, women who eat red meat frequently have almost a third higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes . Frequently eating bacon, hot dogs, and processed (deli-style) meats was associated with a 43% higher risk of type 2 diabetes in women participating in the large health study. The new findings are reported by investigators from Harvard Medical School in the September issue of the journal Diabetes Care. Researchers followed just more than 37,000 women aged 45 or older for an average of eight years. All of the women completed detailed questionnaires accessing their food choices at study entry, and none had heart disease , cancer , or type 2 diabetes . At follow-up, 1,560 of the women had developed type 2 diabetes. Even after adjusting for other risks associated with the development of diabetes such as age, weight , and exercise , the researchers continued to find associations between the amount of processed and red meats eaten and the development of type 2 diabetes. Women who ate five or more servings of red meat a week were found to have a 29% increase in diabetes risk compare with women who ate red meat less than once a week. While those who ate five or more servings of processed meats had a 43% increase in risk compared with women who ate less than a serving of processed meat a week. Researcher Yiqing Song, Continue reading >>

Healthy Tips For Hot Dogs And Hamburgers

Healthy Tips For Hot Dogs And Hamburgers

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition Yes, you can eat hot dogs and hamburgers on your diabetic diet. Just follow a few tips and tricks, and start enjoying these barbecue favorites guilt-free. By Hope S. Warshaw, R.D., CDE; Photos by Scott Little During the warmer months, your social calendar is likely to be sprinkled with cookouts, visits to street fairs, or pool parties where the grill is a-sizzle. And the main course, of course, is hot dogs, sausages, or hamburgers. "Nothing tastes better than a hot dog downed during an inning of baseball or a brat at the Polish polka festival," says Patti Urbanski, M.Ed., R.D., CDE, a dietitian and diabetes educator at the Duluth Family Practice Center in Minnesota who also has type 1 diabetes. Fortunately, you can relish these rituals without ruining your diabetes meal plan. Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition , Portion Control Hamburger meat, by government standards, is fresh or frozen ground beef without anything else added and can contain no more than 30 percent fat by weight. At the supermarket, hamburger meat is labeled with its percentage of lean meat and percentage of fat, such as 80/20 or 93/7. Not so at a friend's barbecue or a ballpark grill. Here are some good rules of thumb: -- A 3-ounce serving of cooked meat is just right -- there's no need to pile on extra patties or order a large burger unless you share. -- Get your hamburgers cooked how you like them (as long as the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees F for safety) because the fat content doesn't differ much based on doneness. -- Spread condiments gingerly, but feel free to use a generous amount of this low-calorie flavor enhancer: mustard. Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition , Portion Control Today's Continue reading >>

Hotdogs, Cold Cuts Significantly Increase Diabetes Risk

Hotdogs, Cold Cuts Significantly Increase Diabetes Risk

Hotdogs, Cold Cuts Significantly Increase Diabetes Risk Substituting nuts and other foods for a daily serving of meat could actually decrease a person's risk of diabetes. Just in time to spoil your summer cookouts: Processed red meats such as hotdogs and cold cuts, the same things that make you fat and give you heart disease, may also increase your risk of diabetes. And while that might not sound too surprising something you might file in the "oh well, everything I like is bad for me" category the degree to which processed meats are associated with diabetes is shockingly high, according to researchers at Harvard School of Public Health. Just a daily serving of 50 grams that's about two slices of cold cuts or one hot dog is associated with more than a 50-percent increase in the risk of developing diabetes . This analysis, appearing Aug. 10 online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, is based on data from three major studies encompassing more than 200,000 adults, some of whom have been followed for nearly 30 years. And, oh yeah, unprocessed red meats such as ground beef and pork also raise your diabetes risk, the researchers said, but not to the same degree. [ 7 Foods Your Heart Will Hate ] The one bit of good news here is that meat eaters can switch to many other foods that lower the risk of diabetes, the researcher found. Diabetes, hardly known a century ago, is now pandemic and affects more than 10 percent of U.S. adults, or about 25 million people. Diabetes is closely associated with obesity, and the incidence of both of these chronic diseases has risen in near parallel in recent years. Doctors have identified many dietary factors associated with diabetes . These include simple carbohydrates, such as white bread, and sweetened drinks and foods. Red meat's c Continue reading >>

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