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Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

The Accuracy Of Home Glucose Meters In Hypoglycemia

The Accuracy Of Home Glucose Meters In Hypoglycemia

Abstract Home glucose meters (HGMs) may not be accurate enough to sense hypoglycemia. We evaluated the accuracy and the capillary and venous comparability of five different HGMs (Optium Xceed [Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA, USA], Contour TS [Bayer Diabetes Care, Basel, Switzerland], Accu-Chek Go [Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland], OneTouch Select [Lifescan, Milpitas, CA, USA], and EZ Smart [Tyson Bioresearch Inc., Chu-Nan, Taiwan]) in an adult population. The insulin hypoglycemia test was performed to 59 subjects (56 males; 23.6 +/- 3.2 years old). Glucose was measured from forearm venous blood and finger capillary samples both before and after regular insulin (0.1 U/kg) was injected. Venous samples were analyzed in the reference laboratory by the hexokinase method. In vitro tests for method comparison and precision analyses were also performed by spiking the glucose-depleted venous blood. All HGMs failed to sense hypoglycemia to some extend. EZ Smart was significantly inferior in critical error Zone D, and OneTouch Select was significantly inferior in the clinically unimportant error Zone B. Accu-Chek Go, Optium Xceed, and Contour TS had similar performances and were significantly better than the other two HGMs according to error grid analysis or International Organization for Standardization criteria. The in vitro tests were consistent with the above clinical data. The capillary and venous consistencies of Accu-Chek Go and OneTouch Select were better than the other HGMs. The present results show that not all the HGMs are accurate enough in low blood glucose levels. The patients and the caregivers should be aware of these restrictions of the HGMs and give more credit to the symptoms of hypoglycemia than the values obtained by the HGMs. Finally, these results indicate Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

11 Best Glucose Meters

11 Best Glucose Meters

by Jessica Hegg April 02, 2018 0 Comments Stay on top of your diabetes with the best glucose meter. These essential devices allow you to monitor your blood sugar numbers, discover the effects that food and activity have on your glucose levels, and help you make changes accordingly. Below, we list the best glucometers on the market and provide you with some top tips on their selection and use. Containing everything you need to measure your blood sugar levels, this Bayer product earns the top spot on our list of the best blood glucose meters. The kit includes the superior and highly accurate Bayer Contour NEXT Meter, test strips, a lancing device, lancets, a control solution for testing, and a detailed instruction manual. Includes everything you need to test your blood sugar Easy Touchs bestselling testing kit is CLIA certified for accuracy. Each kit contains a glucose meter, 100 test strips, 100 lancets, a log book, instructions, and a carry case. The meter takes a reading in just five seconds and requires a tiny blood sample for quick and painless results. There are four alarm settings, and you can save your previous readings for weekly or monthly averaging. Bayers USA-made Contour meter allows users to choose basic or advanced feature levels depending on their requirements and preferences. With no-coding technology, it is easy to use, accurate, and fast. Choose to test from your palm, finger, or forearm. The devices most notable features include its ability to remember 480 test results and to provide a fourteen-day average. This True Metrix blood glucose meter comes free when you purchase these test strips. The device can take a measurement from just half a microliter of blood, while it also takes into account the sample environment and temperature. A sophisticated al Continue reading >>

Best Glucose Meter 2018 - Reviews Of Blood-sugar Monitors

Best Glucose Meter 2018 - Reviews Of Blood-sugar Monitors

After three weeks of testing, research and evaluation, the Contour Next One emerged as our pick for the best glucometer overall. This meter is exceptionally easy to use, performed better than all the others in our tests and comes with a mobile app for easy data management. In addition, the test strips are available everywhere and are among the more affordable options available. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, its important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but theyre not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. In fact, due to the diversity and features included with glucometers, Kristen Scheney, a nutritionist from CCS Medical, recommends that newly diagnosed diabetics talk with a medical professional about getting the glucometer that best meets their needs. Best Glucometer for Data Management: Dario Dario is one of the newest brands and most unique glucometers to hit the market in recent years. Unlike other glucose meters, the Dario meter plugs into your smartphone. You download the companion app, and it acts as the glucometers interface. The app is also a well-designed data management system that helps you track your diabetes. There's no need to sync data via Bluetooth or connect the glucometer to a computer with a micro-USB cable the data uploads as you take your reading. This is why Dario is our pick for the glucometer with the best data management app. The app is well designed and easy to navigate. It has animations that let you know it's reading your sample, and the display is only limited by the size of your smart Continue reading >>

Prevalence And Predictors Of Home Use Of Glucometers In Diabetic Patients

Prevalence And Predictors Of Home Use Of Glucometers In Diabetic Patients

Go to: Abstract Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is a critical component of diabetes care. However, it has been shown that use of glucometers in developing countries such as Pakistan is limited. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of glucometer usage in the urban diabetic population of Karachi and to identify variables that influenced the likelihood of practice of SMBG. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 567 adult diabetic patients selected at random from the out-patient departments of multiple healthcare institutions in Karachi categorized into two settings; Government and Private. Non-diabetics, patients having gestational diabetes, diabetes insipidus and Cushing’s syndrome and terminally ill patients were excluded. Pearson Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U test were applied as the primary statistical method. Prevalence of home glucometer usage was 59% (n= 331). High socioeconomic status (p < 0.001), receiving care from private institutions (p < 0.001), higher education (p < 0.001), a family history of diabetes (p =0.001), awareness regarding diabetes (p < 0.001), having diabetes for > five years (p <0.001), and managing diabetes via pharmacological interventions (p <0.001) (versus diet and exercise) were significant positive predictors of glucometer usage. Our study demonstrates the increasing trend in use of SMBG. Lack of awareness and cost of glucometers were reported to be the main reasons for not practicing SMBG. Given these factors are easily modifiable, government subsidized initiatives and awareness programs can result in a successful public health strategy to promote SMBG. Keywords: self monitoring, predictors, diabetes mellitus, home glucometer, smbg Continue reading >>

Determining The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Meter

Determining The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Meter

Determining the Accuracy of Your Glucose Meter By Gary Gilles | Reviewed by Joel Forman, MD BSIP/UIG/Universal Images Group/Getty Images If you're like most people with diabetes , you probably assume that your glucose meter gives you accurate readings every time you check your blood. You base your insulin dose , food intake, and activity plans off that number. Fortunately, most glucose meters are well designed and give reasonably accurate test results. But there are some things you should know about your glucose meter to help you make the most educated decisions about your diabetes management. If youve ever taken your blood sugar twice or three times in a row without any delay in between tests, youve probably noticed that you dont get the same exact number each time. That doesnt mean your meter isnt operating correctly. It does, though, reflect the variance that is built into each meter. Within the medical community, home blood glucose meters are considered clinically accurate if the result is within 20 percentof what a lab test would indicate. For example, if your glucose meter result was 100 mg/dL, it could vary on the downside to 80 mg/dL or on the upside to 120 mg/dL and still be considered clinically accurate. Your Glucose Meter Measures Blood Differently Than the Lab All blood glucose meters use whole blood to measure glucose . Whole blood is simply a blood sample that contains the red blood cells. In a lab glucose test, only the plasma portion of the blood is used to measure glucose levels; the red blood cells are removed. Whole blood glucose test results are approximately 12 percentlower than the lab plasma results. But there is a way to compare the lab result with your meter. Before you do that, first you need to learn more about your meter. Your Meter Is Cali Continue reading >>

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Everyone with diabetes should test their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. Knowing the results lets you tweak your strategy for keeping the disease in check, as needed. Regular testing can also help you avoid getting long-term health problems that can stem from the condition. Research shows that in people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, sticking to your target blood sugar and HbA1c levels makes complications less likely. 1. Traditional Home Glucose Monitoring You prick your finger with a lancet (a small, sharp needle), put a drop of blood on a test strip, and then place the strip into a meter that displays your blood sugar levels. Meters vary in features, portability, speed, size, cost, and readability (with larger displays or spoken instructions if you have vision problems). Devices deliver results in less than 15 seconds and store this information for future use. Some meters also calculate an average blood sugar level over a span of time. Some also feature software kits that take information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Blood sugar meters and strips are available at your local pharmacy. 2. Meters That Test Other Parts of Your Body. Some devices let you test you upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. These results may differ from the blood sugar levels gotten from a fingertip stick. Levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly. This is especially true when your sugar is changing fast, like after a meal or after exercise. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar, don’t rely on test results from other parts of your body. 3. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Some of these devices are combined with insulin pumps. They're not as accurate as finger-stick glucose results. But they can help you find p Continue reading >>

5 Best Glucometers - Mar. 2018 - Bestreviews

5 Best Glucometers - Mar. 2018 - Bestreviews

Zero products received from manufacturers. We purchase every product we review with our own funds we never accept anything from product manufacturers. If you are one of the more than 29 million people in the U.S. living with diabetes, a glucometer is your best friend. This small device is used to test your blood glucose (BG) levels at any given time, providing an indication of whether those levels are high, low, or on target. Diabetics test their blood as often as 10 times per day, depending on circumstances. They select the proper remedy based on the reading, whether its taking insulin for high blood sugar or ingesting a glucose tablet, sugar-based soft drink, or orange juice for low blood sugar. No matter the size, shape, or advanced features of a glucometer, the process of using the device is almost always the same. It begins with placing a test strip in the glucometer and then drawing a small amount of blood from a finger or other designated area with a specially designed lancing device. The blood is placed on the test strip, and the glucometer springs into action. Within seconds, a digital readout of your blood glucose level appears. Get exclusive content, advice, and tips from BestReviews delivered to your inbox. Dr. Schreiber earned a bachelor of science in dietetics with a minor in biology from the University of Delaware, then continued at the University of Bridgeport in Bridgeport, CT, earning his doctorate of chiropractic and masters degree in human nutrition.He is double board certified in rehabilitation and clinical nutrition. He has been featured in prominent publications such as the Huffington Post, livestrong.com, and WebMD.com. Dr. Schreiber | Chiropractic Physician, Acupuncturist, Nutritionist The American Diabetes Association considers readings betwee Continue reading >>

The Accuracy Of Home Glucose Meters In Hypoglycemia.

The Accuracy Of Home Glucose Meters In Hypoglycemia.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Home glucose meters (HGMs) may not be accurate enough to sense hypoglycemia. We evaluated the accuracy and the capillary and venous comparability of five different HGMs (Optium Xceed [Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA, USA], Contour TS [Bayer Diabetes Care, Basel, Switzerland], Accu-Chek Go [Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland], OneTouch Select [Lifescan, Milpitas, CA, USA], and EZ Smart [Tyson Bioresearch Inc., Chu-Nan, Taiwan]) in an adult population. METHODS: The insulin hypoglycemia test was performed to 59 subjects (56 males; 23.6 +/- 3.2 years old). Glucose was measured from forearm venous blood and finger capillary samples both before and after regular insulin (0.1 U/kg) was injected. Venous samples were analyzed in the reference laboratory by the hexokinase method. In vitro tests for method comparison and precision analyses were also performed by spiking the glucose-depleted venous blood. RESULTS: All HGMs failed to sense hypoglycemia to some extend. EZ Smart was significantly inferior in critical error Zone D, and OneTouch Select was significantly inferior in the clinically unimportant error Zone B. Accu-Chek Go, Optium Xceed, and Contour TS had similar performances and were significantly better than the other two HGMs according to error grid analysis or International Organization for Standardization criteria. The in vitro tests were consistent with the above clinical data. The capillary and venous consistencies of Accu-Chek Go and OneTouch Select were better than the other HGMs. CONCLUSIONS: The present results show that not all the HGMs are accurate enough in low blood glucose levels. The patients and the caregivers should be aware of these restrictions of the HGMs and give more credit to the symptoms of hypoglycemia than the values obtained b Continue reading >>

Meters: Does Your Device Measure Up?

Meters: Does Your Device Measure Up?

Download our latest printable product listings. Think of picking out a blood glucose meter the same way you would choose a car. You might consider cost first and then compare features to narrow down your options until you find the one that works best for you. You may even be able to sit with a diabetes educator and look over a number of meters to get a feel for them, says Molly McElwee-Malloy, RN, CDE, CPT, patient care manager in diabetes education at the University of Virginia Health System and a spokeswoman for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. The main thing people think about is cost, she says. But I think you should [also] think about something that is really going to do the most work for you. If youre stumped by all of the features to consider, focus on five main factors: ease of use, size and shape, reimbursement, accuracy, and download ability. Meters are typically affordable (most are in the range of $10 to $50) and are often discounted or free with coupons. The real cost with testing your blood glucose comes with the strips, says McElwee-Malloy. Test strips retail for anywhere between less than 50cents and $2 a strip, depending on the technology, and that can get expensive if you check your blood glucose multiple times a day. The cost of diabetes has never been higher, says endocrinologist Timothy Bailey, MD, FACE, CPI, director of AMCR Institute in Escondido, California, and a clinical associate professor at the University of CaliforniaSan Diego School of Medicine. A good way to save? Call your insurance company to find out which meters and strips are preferred (typically listed on the companys formulary). The cost of preferred meters and test strips will be covered at the most benefit to you. You can still get a meter that is not preferred by Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter

Glucose Meter

Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1993–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters typically provide results in 5 seconds). A glucose meter is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. It can also be a strip of glucose paper dipped into a substance and measured to the glucose chart. It is a key element of home blood glucose monitoring (HBGM) by people with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia. A small drop of blood, obtained by pricking the skin with a lancet, is placed on a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the blood glucose level. The meter then displays the level in units of mg/dl or mmol/l. Since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been achieving closer-to-normal levels of glucose in the blood for as much of the time as possible, guided by HBGM several times a day. The benefits include a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long-term complications from hyperglycemia as well as a reduction in the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia. History[edit] Leland Clark presented his first paper about the oxygen electrode, later named the Clark electrode, on 15 April 1956, at a meeting of the American Society for Artificial Organs during the annual meetings of the Federated Societies for Experimental Biology.[1][2] In 1962, Clark and Ann Lyons from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital developed the first glucose enzyme electrode. This biosensor was based on a thin layer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on an oxygen electrode. Thus, the readout was the amount of oxygen consumed by GOx during the enzymatic reaction with the substra Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Many types of blood glucose meters are available. Here's how to choose one that fits your needs and lifestyle. If you have diabetes, you'll likely need a blood glucose meter to measure and display the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. Exercise, food, medications, stress and other factors affect your blood glucose level. Using a blood glucose meter can help you better manage your diabetes by tracking any fluctuations in your blood glucose level. Many types of blood glucose meters are available, from basic models to more-advanced meters with multiple features and options. The cost of blood glucose meters and test strips varies, as does insurance coverage. Study your options before deciding which model to buy. Choosing the right meter When selecting a blood glucose meter, it can help to know the basics of how they work. To use most blood glucose meters, you first insert a test strip into the device. Then you prick a clean fingertip with a special needle (lancet) to get a drop of blood. You carefully touch the test strip to the blood and wait for a blood glucose reading to appear on the screen. When used and stored properly, blood glucose meters are generally accurate in how they measure glucose. They differ in the type and number of features they offer. Here are several factors to consider when choosing a blood glucose meter: Insurance coverage. Check with your insurance provider for coverage details. Some insurance providers limit coverage to specific models or limit the total number of test strips allowed. Cost. Meters vary in price. Be sure to factor in the cost of test strips. Ease of use and maintenance. Some meters are easier to use than others. Are both the meter and test strips comfortable and easy to hold? Can you easily see the numbers on the screen? How e Continue reading >>

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