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Hispanic Culture Diabetes

Why Hispanics Are At A Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes | Everyday Health

Why Hispanics Are At A Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes | Everyday Health

Family culture and poor access to healthcare may play a role in Hispanic people's increased risk for type 2 diabetes. For decades, Martin Gomez enjoyed tacos and burritos without a care. The carbohydrate-laden comfort food kept him energized so he could work hard, bringing his paychecks home from his job as a landscaper to support his extended family. But little did he realize that same food would one day threaten everything. Gomez, a 56-year-old Hispanic resident of Houston, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a health fair about 15 years ago. Because diabetes requires blood sugar management through diet and lifestyle changes, as well as medication in many cases, he worried whether he would be able to keep his job in landscaping or whether he would ever be able to eat his familys cooking again. He wasnt sure he would have enough time in the day to work in exercise, diet tracking, pharmacy visits and doctors visits. Poorly managed diabetes can lead to life-threatening complications such as kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, and vision issues. At first, Gomez says through a translator, his diabetes diagnosis felt like a death sentence. Why There Are Higher Rates of Diabetes Among Hispanic People Gomezs situation is hardly unusual. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , 50 percent of Hispanic adults in the United States are expected to develop the chronic disease type 2 diabetes a rate that is higher than for the average adult, who has a 40 percent likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. The CDC also estimates that Hispanic people are 50 percent more likely to die from the disease than white people are. While Hispanic people overall are estimated to be at a higher risk for diabetes, theyre not the only group: The prevalen Continue reading >>

Hispanic Health: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Hispanic Health: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Government leaders and close-knit families. Olympic athletes and celebrated artists. This month we commemorate Hispanic and Latino culture, connection, and contributions. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15–October 15, we celebrate the culture of US residents who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. And while recognizing their many contributions and achievements, let’s also acknowledge Hispanic and Latino people’s greater risk for type 2 diabetes and take action to prevent it. Greater Diabetes Risk Over their lifetimes, 40% of US adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes. That number is even higher for Hispanic men and women—more than 50%. Diabetes is a disease in which blood sugar levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into blood sugar for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin to help blood sugar get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in the blood, which over time can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and nerve damage leading to amputation of a foot or leg. Currently, more than 30 million Americans have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) and can’t yet be prevented. It’s usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes develops over many years and is usually diagnosed in adults (though increasingly in children, teens, a Continue reading >>

Obesity, Diabetes, Stroke Plague Hispanic Community - Cnn

Obesity, Diabetes, Stroke Plague Hispanic Community - Cnn

Hispanic population disproportionately affected by cardiovascular diseases 25% of Hispanic women who are overweight perceive their weight as "normal" Experts say differences due to lack of health care access, cultural factors Elma Dieppa wonders if her cousin Helen Casillas would still be alive today if she had been more aware of how her weight contributed to her diabetes. "She refused to take care of herself by not watching what she ate or exercising," Dieppa wrote in a blog post honoring the woman she describes as the "life of the party" -- funny, beautiful and genuine. Casillas died of a heart attack at age 44. Although Casillas lived with diabetes for years and worked in the medical field, her perception of her own disease was skewed, Dieppa said. Casillas told her cousin that the doctor wanted to take an aggressive approach to her weight loss, but Casillas didn't believe she was obese. "This is the problem within the Hispanic community," Dieppa wrote on the blog. "We love our curves, but the line between beautiful and deadly curves is blurred." In a 2010 study , Abbey Berenson and her colleagues surveyed 1,076 Hispanic women who went to public health clinics in Texas about their weight. The researchers found about 25% of the overweight Hispanic women perceived their weight as "normal," while only 15% of non-Latino white women did. "Hispanic and African-American women were more likely to consider their weight normal when in fact they were overweight," said Berenson, a professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch. Latinos overall are also less likely to lose weight and "more vulnerable to cardiovascular disease risk factors and other obesity related diseases," the study authors wrote. Helen Casillas died of a heart attack at age 44. For example, diabetes affe Continue reading >>

Cultural Considerations In Diabetes Education

Cultural Considerations In Diabetes Education

AADE Practice Synopsis Introduction The chronic nature of diabetes underscores the importance of self-management education that promotes behavior skills that are necessary to optimize quality of life. Diabetes educators recognize that the most effective approach to patient education is individualized to the needs of each person with diabetes.1 Educators likewise recognize that the way a person learns, and how information is utilized depends heavily on prior life experiences and support networks; and that each of these elements is shaped by culture.2 Awareness of how culture impacts health Awareness of the need for cultural sensitivity is the first step toward providing sensitive and competent diabetes education. It is more than a finite knowledge of cultural values, beliefs, customs, language, thoughts, and actions. The need to gain relevant insight necessitates the need to develop a certain amount of cultural humility. This will help develop a mutually respectful and positive relationship among patients and health care providers. The more engaged individuals with diabetes and their support members are involved in their healthcare, the more likely they are to achieve desired outcomes and improve their quality of life. Culturally relevant definitions The AADE Practice Synopsis on Cultural Sensitivity and Diabetes Education provides insight on the role of diabetes educators in delivering appropriately tailored education. Cultural definitions germane to the understanding of cultural sensitivity and diabetes may be found in the synopsis along with the following definitions.3 Cultural sensitivity: the delivery of health information based on ethnic/cultural, norms, values, social beliefs, historical, environmental factors unique to specific population. Cultural competence: kn Continue reading >>

Latinos And Hispanics And Diabetes: The Need For Outreach

Latinos And Hispanics And Diabetes: The Need For Outreach

Latinos and Hispanics and Diabetes: The Need for Outreach About half of all Latinos and Hispanics have diabetes. Is our health care system prepared? Hispanics and Latinos make up the fastest-growing demographic of the U.S. population. They also are experiencing the fastest increase in the rates of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and that alarms many public health officials. According to a recent American Diabetes Association analysis of diabetes health data, 52.5% of Hispanic women and 45.4% of Hispanic men will have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes in their lifetimes. In contrast, only 31.2% of non-Hispanic women and 26.7% of non-Hispanic men will experience diabetes, according to a WebMD report. In a recent survey conducted by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health, health care costs and diabetes rank as the top health concerns among Latino and Hispanic Americans, according to an article in Kaiser Health News. Such demographic trends mean that if were to have any hope of containing diabetes costs, it will require effective outreach to Hispanic and Latino communities. Unfortunately, public health experts warn, there are multiple barriers to providing these communities with the tools needed for effective diabetes care, and failure to meet the diabetes needs of Hispanics and Latinos is draining the U.S. health care system. A 2009 study by the Urban Institute estimated that inferior access to health care among racial minorities will cost the nation $337 billion over a 10-year period. Our health care system is barely prepared to face the challenge of managing diabetes in this high-risk group, writes Dr. A. Enrique Caballero, director of the Latino Diabetes Initiative at the Joslin Diabetes Center, in a position paper on Hispanics and diabetes Continue reading >>

Cultural Differences In Diabetes

Cultural Differences In Diabetes

Ethnic Diversity: Disparities and Challenges A crucial challenge facing healthcare providers seeking to prevent diabetes and improve diabetes outcomes is the rapidly increasing ethnic diversity in the United States and the disproportionate incidence and prevalence of both diabetes and diabetes-related complications among ethnic minorities. Both diabetes prevention and management require that people engage in multiple healthy behaviors involving diet, physical activity, and other behaviors that are shaped by an individual's culture and values. Effective strategies to prevent diabetes and improve diabetes outcomes thus need to incorporate a sound knowledge of cultural differences. A 2-hour symposium held on the first day of this year's American Diabetes Association meeting was dedicated to exploring the features of effective programs targeting different Latino, inner-city African American, and Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the United States. [1] The 3 speakers were Enrique Caballero, MD, an endocrinologist and clinical investigator at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, and Director of the Joslin Diabetes Center's Latino Diabetes Initiative in Boston; Michele Heisler, MD, MPA, a research scientist at the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health System, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, and coinvestigator on the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) Detroit initiative focusing on several African American and Latino communities in inner-city Detroit, Michigan; and Nina Agbayani, RN, of the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO), Oakland, California. Each of the speakers highlighted the rapidly growing incidence of diabetes and diabetes- Continue reading >>

Consider Unique Ethnicity Among Hispanics With Diabetes

Consider Unique Ethnicity Among Hispanics With Diabetes

Consider Unique Ethnicity Among Hispanics With Diabetes Health beliefs can vary greatly from one Hispanic culture to another, expert says by Joyce Frieden Joyce Frieden, News Editor, MedPage Today WASHINGTON -- Providers need to take into account Hispanic patients' specific ethnic backgrounds when they are treating them for diabetes, Aida Luz Giachello, PhD , said here at the National Hispanic Medical Association annual meeting . "Most studies on Hispanics' cultural beliefs, attitudes, and healthcare practices refer primarily to first-generation Mexicans in the U.S. and those living in the Southwest," even though those groups' beliefs and practices may differ greatly from Hispanics in other U.S. geographic areas, or those hailing from other places such as Central America or the Caribbean, said Giachello, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. The particular cultural background the patient comes from will define who the "healers" are, she explained. Formal healers are healthcare professionals, but informal healers could include religious leaders and well as faith healers, she noted, adding that in some Hispanic cultures it's more acceptable to get health advice from an informal healer. For instance, for a Mexican man who is an alcoholic, "It might be easier for him to tell his friend, 'Listen, I'm not going to drink any more because the church told me I should not continue with this behavior,'" she said. "It's easier to mention those aspects when they talk with their peers." There are some beliefs and practices that many Hispanic cultures have in common, Giachello said. These include: Having a holistic view of good health -- good health means you are behaving according to God's will and community norms Believing that diabetes is a temporary c Continue reading >>

Caring For Latino Patients

Caring For Latino Patients

GREGORY JUCKETT, MD, MPH, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, West Virginia Am Fam Physician.2013Jan1;87(1):48-54. This version of the article contains supplemental content. Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Manybut not allfolk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the teach back technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients. The ethnic terms Latino or Hispanic refer to a Continue reading >>

Overview Of Type 2 Diabetes In Hispanic Americans

Overview Of Type 2 Diabetes In Hispanic Americans

Overview of type 2 diabetes in Hispanic Americans We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. International journal of body composition research Overview of type 2 diabetes in Hispanic Americans Diabetes mellitus continues to be a heavy burden on health and health resources throughout the world. In the USA the burden is borne disproportionately by ethnic minorities such as Hispanics. Therefore health education for Hispanics is important and it can help reduce the incidence of diabetes among Hispanics in the USA. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, prevention of diabetes, diabetes education, Hispanics in the USA Irrespective of age, culture and gender, diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most chronic debilitating medical diseases plaguing our world today. As of 2005, it was estimated that approximately 220 million people worldwide had DM [ 1 ]. In the United States, DM is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality and there has been a continuous rise over the years with 104% increase between 1980 and 2004 [ 2 ] and approximately 23.6 million people have DM [ 3 ]. However, this figure is disproportionately distributed among different ethnic groups within the United States. Hispanic ethnicity is one of the fastest growing ethnicities in the USA. As of 2006, it was estimated that there were 44.3 million Hispanics living in the USA. [ 4 ]. Of these, 66% are Mexican American and 9% are Puerto Rican [ 5 ]. An estimated 2.5 millio Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mexicans: Why The Two Are Linked1

Diabetes And Mexicans: Why The Two Are Linked1

Go to: The Past Obesity and diabetes were probably rare before the advent of agriculture. Our ancestors, hunters and gatherers for millennia, had varied but unpredictable diets. Studies of hunter-gatherers of the 20th century suggest that animal sources dominated our ancient food basket, with plants (fruits, vegetables, and nuts) providing only 20% to 40% of total energy (1). Modern and presumably ancient hunter-gatherer populations, despite a high-fat, high-protein diet, were free of the signs and symptoms of noncommunicable diseases — a paradox. Perhaps energy needs were not always met, thus keeping body sizes in check; also, the relative lack of salt and simple carbohydrates, a mix of saturated and good fats, plenty of fiber, abundant micronutrients, a vigorous and active life, and less stress than we now endure may explain this finding. With the food supply uncertain, one would expect individuals with "thrifty" genotypes — genotypes that increase the ability to turn food to fat — to have a survival edge. Agriculture brought a more predictable food supply but less variety. Crops failed from time to time, bringing on famines when stores of grain were depleted, but over time, agriculture allowed for increasingly larger populations, with thrifty genotypes thriving as before. Super foods — such as corn in Mesoamerica, the substance from which the Mayan gods in their fourth attempt were finally able to make man, according to the Popul Vuh, the sacred book of the Maya — came to provide as much as 80% or more of energy needs. Crowding brought new types of infections, which along with limited diets gave rise to the nutritional deficiencies that have plagued humankind in recent millennia. Agriculture fostered the development of highly stratified societies, and it be Continue reading >>

Posted 08.16.2016

Posted 08.16.2016

By Willy Marcos Valencia, Lisset Oropesa-Gonzalez, Christie-Michele Hogue, and Hermes Jose Florez The epidemic of type 2 diabetes is a major health and social problem, affecting more than 29 million people in the United States (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2014). Type 2 diabetes is defined by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) as a condition characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from the body’s inability to use blood glucose for energy. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is no longer able to provide enough insulin and also the body is unable to use it correctly (ADA, 2013). Type 2 diabetes develops through a combination of genetic risk factors (family history), non-modifiable risk factors (such as age, race, or ethnicity), and modifiable risk factors (such as obesity and smoking). With age, the disease process becomes more complicated, as there are changes in body composition (gaining body fat, losing muscle), metabolism (less calories burned), and function (less physically active). Furthermore, type 2 diabetes in older adults can be long-standing (diagnosed before age 65) or new onset (at any age), resulting in an increased prevalence in this age group, and while it can be reversed or controlled, there is no cure for it. The Office of Minority Health in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) offers epidemiological data on diabetes in Hispanics, based on national examination surveys (HHS, 2014). The report describes Hispanics as almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes when compared with non-Hispanic whites. Older Hispanics with diabetes are a vulnerable sub-population of interest because of their increased susceptibility to chronic diseases like obesity, diabetes, and hypertension (American Heart Association [AHA], 20 Continue reading >>

Improve Diabetes Care In The Latino Community Rds Who Learn The Culture And Language Are Off To A Great Start

Improve Diabetes Care In The Latino Community Rds Who Learn The Culture And Language Are Off To A Great Start

Improve Diabetes Care in the Latino Community RDs Who Learn the Culture and Language Are Off to a Great Start Rosa, a 45-year-old Latina woman, enters a diabetes clinic for a follow-up visit. She missed her appointment last month and the month before. When she arrives, shes 30 minutes late, and her blood glucose is 280 mg/dL. She explains she hasnt taken her glucose-lowering medications in weeks because she doesnt have the money to renew her prescriptions. Rosa lives with her husband, their four children, her mother, and her brother. During the day, she cleans guest rooms at a motel; at night, she waits tables at a neighborhood restaurant. She speaks little English, and she doesnt drive. Rosas home life and work life is typical of the Latino community, according to David Orozco, MS, RD, a private practice dietitian and consultant to the Emory University School of Medicines Latino Diabetes Education Program in Atlanta. Whats also typical among Latinos is a diabetes diagnosis. Latinos are the largest minority group in the United States, and their prevalence of diabetes is twice that of non-Hispanic whites. Latinos tend to have higher hemoglobin A1c levels, greater rates of obesity, diabetes complications, and associated mortality. When working with Latinos, Orozco says, dietitians need to understand their culture and unique barriers to healthcare to engage and help them set and meet goals. This article will provide strategies dietitians can use to help Latino patients with diabetes stabilize blood sugar, increase physical activity, and eat more healthfully despite the unique cultural and lifestyle challenges they face. Helping Rosa and others in her community control blood glucose and prevent diabetes complications poses several challenges. The first is getting Latinos t Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Hispanic Or Latino Population: Genes, Environment, Culture, Andmore.

Diabetes In The Hispanic Or Latino Population: Genes, Environment, Culture, Andmore.

Diabetes in the Hispanic or Latino population: genes, environment, culture, andmore. (1)Latino Diabetes Initiative, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, One Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02215, USA. [email protected] The Hispanic or Latino population is the largest minority group in the UnitedStates, currently representing 13.7% of the total U.S. population. Hispanics orLatinos usually suffer from higher rates of type 2 diabetes, obesity, metabolicsyndrome, and their multiple vascular complications. Inadequate nutrition andreduced physical activity in the setting of an increased genetic predispositionto type 2 diabetes have contributed to the inexorable rise in metabolicabnormalities in Hispanics in the United States, which now affect many childrenand adolescents. It is evident that multiple medical, cultural, and socioeconomicfactors influence the development of diabetes, its course, and its consequences. Our health care system is barely prepared to face the challenge of managingdiabetes in this high-risk group. Culturally oriented clinical care, education,outreach and research programs are needed to better identify the challenges tocreate opportunities to improve the lives of Hispanics or Latinos with diabetesor at risk for the disease. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Gene Common In Latinos Has Ancient Roots

Diabetes Gene Common In Latinos Has Ancient Roots

When it comes to the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, there are many factors to blame. Diet and exercise sit somewhere at the top of the list. But the genes that some of us inherit from Mom and Dad also help determine whether we develop the disease, and how early it crops up. Now an international team of scientists have identified mutations in a gene that suggests an explanation for why Latinos are almost twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as Caucasians and African-Americans. But here's the kicker: You have to go further back on the family tree than your parents to find who's to blame for this genetic link to diabetes. Think thousands of generations ago. Harvard geneticist David Altshuler and his colleagues uncovered hints that humans picked up the diabetes mutations from Neanderthals, our ancient cousins who went extinct about 30,000 years ago. "As far as I know, this is the first time a version of a gene from Neanderthal has been connected to a modern-day disease," Altshuler tells Shots. He and his colleagues report the findings Wednesday in the journal Nature. A few years ago, geneticists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany sent shock waves through the scientific community when they sequenced the genome of a Neanderthal from a fossil. Hidden in the genetic code were patterns that matched those in human DNA. And the data strongly suggested that humans were more than just friendly neighbors with Neanderthal. "Now it's well accepted that humans interbred with Neanderthals," Altshuler says. On average most of us carry about 2 percent of Neanderthal DNA in our genome. So it's not surprising, he says, that 2 percent of our traits would be inherited from the ancient primates. The new data don't mean that Neanderthals had diabete Continue reading >>

Cultural Insights On Hispanic/latino Patients With Diabetes

Cultural Insights On Hispanic/latino Patients With Diabetes

Cultural Insights on Hispanic/Latino Patients with Diabetes AHRQ. Healthcare cost and utilization project, state inpatient databases (SID), disparities analysis files and AHRQ quality indicators. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Modified version of 4.1. American Diabetes Association. Informacin en Espaol. www.diabetes.org/espanol. Accessed May 9, 2013. American Diabetes Association. Por tu familia. www.diabetes.org/in-my-community/programs/latino-programs/por-tu-familia.html. Accessed May 9, 2013. Brown SA, Garcia AA, Kouzekanani K, Hanis CL. Culturally competent diabetes self-management education for Mexican Americans: the Starr County Border Health Initiative. Diabetes Care. 2002;25(2):259-268. Caballero AE, Tenzer P. Building cultural competency for improved diabetes care: Latino Americans and diabetes. J Fam Pract. 2007;56(suppl 9):S29-S38. Caballero AE. Building cultural bridges: understanding ethnicity to improve acceptance of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Ethn Dis. 2006;16(2):559-568. Caballero AE. Cultural competence in diabetes mellitus care: an urgent need. Insulin. 2007;2(2):80-91. Caballero AE. Understanding the Hispanic/Latino patient. Am J Med. 2011;124:S10-S15. Campos C, Lavernia F, Leal S. The multicultural patient: new strategies for effectively treating type 2 diabetes. Medscape CME. October 13, 2009. Accessed May 9, 2013. Campos C, Lavernia F, Leal S. The multicultural patient: new strategies for effectively treating type 2 diabetes. Released October 13, 2009. Accessed May 8, 2013. Campos C. Addressing cultural barriers to the successful use of insulin in Hispanics with type 2 diabetes. South Med J. 2007;100(8):812-820. Center for Diabetes Services. California Pacific Medical Center. Sample menu for diabe Continue reading >>

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