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Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The World Per Capita

The 50 Countries With The Lowest Diabetes Rates

The 50 Countries With The Lowest Diabetes Rates

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent, have either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Whether it's genetic or a result of a poor diet with little exercise, the prevalence of diabetes in America seems high, especially when you consider the $245 billion price tag Americans are paying for diabetes treatment annually. If the U.S. is in trouble with a diabetes epidemic, what does a country with low diabetes rates look like? Using data from the International Diabetes Federation's 2015 Diabetes Atlas, the following list looks at the countries with the lowest prevalence of diabetes. The data includes the prevalence of Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes (either diagnosed or undiagnosed), as well as the number of diabetes-related fatalities and the annual health care costs of a person who has diabetes. The countries are ranked by age-adjusted prevalence (percent of people who have diabetes adjusted to account for how occurrences of diabetes differ through age and different age structures in various countries). If countries had the same diabetes prevalence, the country with fewer diabetes-related deaths appears higher on the list. The average amount spent per person with diabetes for each country, as reported by the IDF, is also included. These amounts are measured in international dollars, a hypothetical currency with the same purchasing power parity of U.S. dollars in the U.S. at a given point in time. According to the IDF, the global prevalence rate of diabetes in 2015 was 8.8 percent. Each of these countries falls at least 12 percent below the global average, with some countries reporting over 150 percent below the global average rate of diabetes. This data shows that while there are many countries with long life expectancies and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Key Statistics[1] 2015 2025 Estimated diabetes prevalence (n/%) 3.4 million/9.3% 5 million/12.1% Estimated prediabetes prevalence in Canada (n/%) (age 20+) 5.7 million/22.1% 6.4 million/23.2% Estimated diabetes prevalence increase (%) 44% from 2015-2025 Estimated diabetes cost increase (%) 25% from 2015-2025 Impact of diabetes Diabetes complications are associated with premature death. It is estimated that one of ten deaths in Canadian adults was attributable to diabetes in 2008/09.[2] People with diabetes are over three times more likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease, 12 times more likely to be hospitalized with end-stage renal disease and over 20 times more likely to be hospitalized for a non-traumatic lower limb amputation compared to the general population.[3] Thirty per cent of people with diabetes have clinically relevant depressive symptoms; individuals with depression have an approximately 60% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.3 Foot ulceration affects an estimated 15-25% of people with diabetes. One-third of amputations in 2011-2012 were performed on people reporting a diabetic foot wound.[4] Some populations are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes, such as those of South Asian, Asian, African, Hispanic or Aboriginal descent, those who are overweight, older or have low income. Diabetes rates are 3-5 times higher in First Nations, a situation compounded by barriers to care for Aboriginal people.3 Fifty-seven percent of Canadians with diabetes reported they cannot adhere to prescribed treatment due to the high out-of-pocket cost of needed medications, devices and supplies. The average cost for these supports is >3% of income or >$1,500.[5] As a result of stigma or fear of stigma, 37% of Canadians with type 2 diabetes surveyed by the Cana Continue reading >>

India Is The Diabetes Capital Of The World!

India Is The Diabetes Capital Of The World!

The diabetes capital of the world with as many as 50 million people suffering from type-2 diabetes, India has a challenge to face. However, medical experts feel that timely detection and right management can go a long way in helping patients lead a normal life. Diabetes might be one of the most talked about diseases across the world and especially in India, but awareness about the same can well be estimated by the fact that India today has more people with type-2 diabetes (more than 50 million) than any other nation. With the country having the highest number of diabetic patients in the world, the sugar disease is posing an enormous health problem to our country today. Often known as the diabetes capital of the world, India has been witnessing an alarming rise in incidence of diabetes according to the International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries. According to a World Health Organization (WHO) fact sheet on diabetes, an estimated 3.4 million deaths are caused due to high blood sugar. The WHO also estimates that 80 per cent of diabetes deaths occur in low and middle-income countries and projects that such deaths will double between 2016 and 2030. It has been further estimated that the global burden of type-2 diabetes is expected to increase to 438 million by 2030 from 285 million people (recorded in 2010). Similarly, for India this increase is estimated to be 58%, from 51 million people in 2010 to 87 million in 2030. But debates, discussions and deliberations aside, the fundamental thing is to know what exactly is diabetes. To put it simply, it is a medical condition that is caused due to insufficient production and secretion of insulin from the pancreas in case of Type-I diabetes and defective response of insulin Type-2 diabetes. Under normal body circumstan Continue reading >>

Health > Obesity: Countries Compared

Health > Obesity: Countries Compared

The most common value used to measure obesity is the Body Mass Index (BMI) because it is inexpensive and simple to obtain. BMI is computed as the weight in kilograms divided by the value of the height in meters squared. In adults, individuals with BMI between 25 and 29.9 are considered overweight, while those with BMI at 30 and above are obese. Description Obesity is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. In the US, a prospective cohort study showed that being overweight increases the risk of death by 20 t0 40% while obesity increases it up to three-fold compared to individuals with normal weight. It is also closely linked to the development of chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, stroke, musculoskeletal disorders and some types of cancer. Obesity is considered a global epidemic. Its prevalence is continuously monitored through the Global Database on BMI of the WHO. Between 1998 and 2008, the global prevalence of obesity has doubled. It rose from 5% to 10% in men and from 8% to 14% in women worldwide. The prevalence of obesity differs between regions and between high and low income countries. It is highest in the WHO Regions of the Americas (26%) and lowest in South East Asia (3%). The rate of obesity increases with the income level of a country. Countries with upper middle and high income have more than double the rates of those in the lower middle and low income countries. Obesity rates are higher in women than in men worldwide. In low and lower middle income countries, these rates are almost double that of men. In higher income countries, they are similar. There are multiple factors associated with obesity. Genetics, the environment and human behavior play important roles in the development of obesity. Excess energy intake coupled wit Continue reading >>

Study: Countries That Use More High Fructose Corn Syrup Have More Diabetes

Study: Countries That Use More High Fructose Corn Syrup Have More Diabetes

The 20 percent increase in type 2 diabetes is independent of total sugar consumption and obesity. PROBLEM: Is high fructose corn syrup the harbinger of the health apocalypse? A review of the debate in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition rejects HFCS as a causative factor of obesity, arguing that the processed stuff, though scary-sounding, "is not meaningfully different in composition or metabolism from other fructose-glucose sweeteners like sucrose, honey, and fruit juice concentrates." But those in the anti-HFCS camp aren't convinced, and would insist there's still plenty to be wary of -- they point to diabetes as another public health concern whose rise parallels the increased prevalence of HFCS in foods and beverages. METHODOLOGY: "It's very hard to study the effects of high fructose corn syrup on overall health," explained lead author Michael Goran, Professor of Preventive Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, and Pediatrics at USC, "Because we simply don't know how much we're consuming, even in the U.S." So he and fellow researchers at USC and Oxford took a broader, population-based approach, looking at estimates for the prevalence of type 2 diabetes -- culled from two independent sources -- as related to the availability of HFCS in 43 countries. They also looked at the total availability of sugar and calories, along with estimated rates of obesity and impaired glucose tolerance, and each country's GDP. RESULTS: "All indicators of diabetes were higher in countries that use HFCS as compared to those that do not," with type 2 diabetes occurring in 8 percent of the population. Countries that don't use HFCS had a diabetes rate of 6.7 percent -- a 20 percent different in prevalence. These results held when adjusted for BMI averages and economic climate, and were i Continue reading >>

Mexico Diabetes Rates Contend For World's Worst

Mexico Diabetes Rates Contend For World's Worst

MEXICO CITY -- Mexico stands out on World Diabetes Day, Nov. 14, for its dubious distinction of having one of the world's highest rates of the disease, ranking second only to the United States. Diabetes is the leading cause of death in Mexico. An obesity epidemic here is blamed for the high rate of the disease, which affects 24 percent of men and 21 percent of women over the age of 35 years, according to the World Health Organization. Mexico's health secretariat estimates that 90 percent of the cases of Type 2 diabetes in the country can be attributed to being overweight or obese. Doctors and nutritionists blame the obesity epidemic on changing patterns of eating as Mexico modernizes. People are eating more fast foods and drinking more soft drinks. In fact, Mexicans consume more soft drinks than people in any other country, chugging down 43 gallons per capita versus 31 gallons per capita in the U.S, the world's No. 2 consumer, according to Yale University's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. Children are at special risk in Mexico, which also has the world's highest rate of childhood obesity. More than 28 percent of children between ages 5 and 9, and 38 percent of preteens and teenagers ages 10 to 19, suffer from excess weight or obesity, according to Mexico's Social Security Institute. At food stands, where busy Mexicans eat a quick breakfast of warm tamales or quesadillas or grab tacos or tortas for lunch, soft drinks or sugary juices are the frequent accompaniment. Whether on the crowded streets of Mexico City or on back roads in rural areas, cases of glass-bottled soda and juice are ubiquitous at these popular spots known as puestos. Mexicans spend about $14.3 billion annually on soft drinks, according to a 2010 study by a congressional commission. Mexico is in Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

Mario Alberto Maciel Tinajero looks like a fairly healthy 68-year-old. He has a few extra pounds on his chest but he's relatively fit. Yet he's suffered for the last 20 years from what he calls a "terrible" condition: diabetes. "I've never gotten used to this disease," he says. Maciel runs a stall in the Lagunilla market in downtown Mexico City. This market is famous for its custom-made quinceañera dresses and hand-tailored suits. Diabetes has come to dominate Maciel's life. It claimed the life of his mother. He has to take pills and injections every day to keep it under control. And because of the disease he's supposed to eat a diet heavy in vegetables that he views as inconvenient and bland. "Imagine not being able to eat a carnitas taco!" he says with indignation. His doctors have told him to stop eating the steaming hot street food that's for sale all around the market — tacos, tamales, quesadillas, fat sandwiches called tortas. His eyes light up when talks about the roast pork taquitos and simmering beef barbacoa that he's supposed to stay away from. "A person who has to work 8 or 10 hours has to eat what's at hand, what's available," he says. "It's difficult to follow a diabetic diet. The truth is it's very difficult." Diabetes is the leading cause of death in Mexico, according to the World Health Organization. The disease claims nearly 80,000 lives each year, and forecasters say the health problem is expected to get worse in the decades to come. By contrast, in the U.S. it's the sixth leading cause of death, with heart disease and cancer claiming 10 times more Americans each year than diabetes. Rising rates of obesity combined with a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes has caused a slow steady rise in the condition in Mexico over the last 40 years. Now Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rates Are Rising In The Middle East

Diabetes Rates Are Rising In The Middle East

In recent years, parts of the Middle East have been experiencing a food-related public health crisis: an extreme rise in type-2 diabetes in the Arabian Peninsula region. The rate of diabetes in parts of the Arabian Peninsula is over twice the global average rate, and much higher than some other areas of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). And cases of type-2 diabetes outnumber cases of type-1 diabetes by a ratio of 10:1. According to the International Diabetes Federation Atlas, 19.3 percent of adults aged 20 to 79 in the United Arab Emirates are diabetic. In Bahrain, the percentage rises to 19.6—and the statistic jumps to 20 percent for Kuwait, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia. These five nations all rank within the top 15 nations in the world for highest rate of diabetes per capita. Also ranking within the top 40 are the MENA countries of Egypt, Oman, and Lebanon, though diabetes rates there are much closer to the global average. In contrast, diabetes prevalence for this age range is only five percent in the Gulf nation of Yemen. Qatar, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Saudi Arabia also rank in the top 15 countries for obesity; Qatar ranks highest, at number six. Additionally, high rates of smoking have led to increased rates of heart disease and high blood pressure. Last year, in Bahrain, nearly 50 percent of men over age 15 used tobacco products—and the percentage is expected to rise to 86.1 by 2025. Experts, concerned about the rapid increase in lifestyle diseases in this region, have looked to history and environmental factors to identify the cause. According to The Wall Street Journal, “the cause of the high prevalence of diabetes in the region is clear. Unhealthy lifestyles and urbanization are to blame—particularly in the Persian Gulf where the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Incidence And Historical Trends

Diabetes Incidence And Historical Trends

Type 1 Diabetes Incidence There are approximately 500,000 children aged under 15 with type 1 diabetes in the world (Patterson et al. 2014); in 2013 alone, 79,000 more children developed type 1 (IDF Diabetes Atlas 2013). Worldwide, the incidence of type 1 diabetes increased, on average, 3% per year between 1960 to 1996 in children under age 15 (Onkamo et al. 1999). Between 1990 and 1999, incidence increased in most continents, with a rise of 5.3% in North America, 4% in Asia, and 3.2% in Europe. This trend is especially troubling in the youngest children; for every hundred thousand children under age 5, 4% more were diagnosed every year, on average, worldwide (Diamond Project Group 2006). In the U.S., the latest data show that the prevalence of type 1 diabetes increased by 21% in children between 2001 and 2009 (Dabelea et al. 2014), and the incidence of type 1 diabetes in non-Hispanic whites increased by 2.7% per year between 2002 and 2009 (Lawrence et al. 2014). More recent numbers show that overall, type 1 diabetes incidence in children increased by 1.8% per year between 2002 and 2012 (Mayer-Davis et al. 2017). Those numbers are from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study, which has study centers in 5 U.S. states. The CDC collects nation-wide data on diabetes, but does not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A study of a large population of U.S. patients with commercial health insurance found that type 1 (and type 2) prevalence increased between 2002-2013 in children (Li et al. 2015). Another study of U.S. patients-- both children and adults-- with commercial health insurance found that the type 1 diabetes incidence rate increased 1.9% in children between 2001 and 2015, and varied by area. The incidence decreased during that same time period in adults, al Continue reading >>

Geography Of Type 1 Diabetes

Geography Of Type 1 Diabetes

The incidence of type 1 diabetes varies widely in both time and space. There is striking variation in the incidence of type 1 diabetes between one population and the next, and it is still unclear to what extent this is due to differences in genes or environment. Europe has the highest incidence, with peak rates in Finland and Sardinia. Other populations of European descent have high rates of type 1 diabetes, and it has been suggested that higher latitudes (both north and south) carry a higher risk, possibly related to lack of vitamin D from sunlight. There are many exceptions to this rule, however, and the incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen rapidly in populations previously considered immune. These include parts of India, the Middle East, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Asian populations have a low but rising incidence, and will make a major future contribution to the global burden of disease. Migrant studies have been of limited quality, but suggest that children adopt the risk of their host country. There are however important differences between the risk and phenotype of early onset diabetes in different ethnic populations within the same country, for example the USA. Continue reading >>

Countries With The Highest Prevalence Of Diabetes Worldwide In 2017*

Countries With The Highest Prevalence Of Diabetes Worldwide In 2017*

Premium This statistic depicts the countries with the highest prevalence of diabetes worldwide in 2017. The Marshall Islands was the country with the highest prevalence of diabetes, with some 33 percent of its population aged between 20 and 79 suffering from the disease. In that same year, approximately 13 percent of adults in the United States had diabetes, while only 7.7 percent of those in Japan had the disease. If left untreated diabetes can cause heart disease and stroke and can damage a persons eyes, kidneys and nerves. Statistics on "Diabetes" Everything On "Diabetes" in One Document: Edited and Divided into Handy Chapters. Including Detailed References. Continue reading >>

World Health Day: India Among Top 3 Countries With High Diabetic Population

World Health Day: India Among Top 3 Countries With High Diabetic Population

After tightening laws on tobacco and alcohol, experts now want a high tax on sugary drinks as they cause a sugar high that leads to insulin resistance. Ahead of World Health Day (April 7), the Lancet study (to be published online late tonight) said there is a fourfold rise in the number of diabetics – from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 and half of them live in India, China, USA, Brazil and Indonesia. According to the Lancet study, China, India and USA are among the top three countries with a high number of diabetic population. While the numbers climbed from 20.4 million in China in 1980 to 102.9 million in 2014, the rise has been equally dramatic in India from 11.9 million in 1980 to 64.5 million in India. Prevalence of diabetes has more than doubled for men in India and China (3.7 per cent to 9.1 per cent in India and 3.5 per cent to 9.9 per cent in China). It has also increased by 50 per cent among women in China (5.0 per cent to 7.6 per cent) and 80 per cent among women in India (4.6 per cent to 8.3 per cent). Dietary patterns must change, with more fibre and protein and less of sugar and starches in the diet. A high tax on sugary drinks is needed, as they cause a sugar high that leads to insulin resistance, Dr K Srinath Reddy, President of Public Health Foundation of India told The Indian Express. The government launched an adult screening programme for diabetes and hypertension in some districts, but it has had an inadequate response. Unless early detection and effective treatment become a part of routinely available primary health services, we will fail in protecting persons with diabetes from having serious complications. Urban planning must support safe and pleasurable physical activity, especially active commuting. Public education on the prevent Continue reading >>

Top 10: Which Country Has The Highest Rates Of Diabetes In Europe? The Uk’s Position Might Surprise You…

Top 10: Which Country Has The Highest Rates Of Diabetes In Europe? The Uk’s Position Might Surprise You…

Every year, the IDF produces a report on diabetes rates in Europe. The latest, Diabetes In Europe Policy Puzzle: The State We Are In, sheds some interesting light on the worst-affected nations. These are the 10 nations hit most heavily by rising diabetes rates. The UK’s position might just surprise you… 10. Cyprus: 10.2 per cent of the population has diabetes The report estimates that Cyprus spends $2,295 on each person with diabetes. Not surprisingly, diabetes care is a big priority for Cyprus. The government has taken positive steps to address the issue, with a large-scale prevention plan to be introduced in 2016. 9. Spain: 10.58 Spain spends $3,090 per person. There are national and regional strategies in place, but diabetes associations aren’t happy with them. They don’t think there’s enough support or resources to make a difference. 8. Malta: 10.69 Malta spends $2,113 per person. Most of their prevention methods focus on lifestyle changes. People are encouraged to eat well, exercise more, and quit smoking. Unlike Spain, diabetes prevention programmes in Malta get a lot of political backing. 7. Macedonia: 11.44 Macedonia spends $403 per person. Their prevention programmes have a strong political backing. However, they don’t have a lot of money to spend. The Macedonian Diabetes Association says: “The funds available are limited and their duration is uncertain due to the many political, organisational and financial changes in our country.” 6. Germany: 11.52 Germany spends $4,943 per person, one of the highest in Europe. Different regions prioritise diabetes more than others, but diabetes isn’t considered a big national concern. There’s not much political commitment to prevention. Neither are there many resources allocated. The IDF report asked a Ge Continue reading >>

List Of Countries By Incidence Of Type 1 Diabetes Ages 0 To 14

List Of Countries By Incidence Of Type 1 Diabetes Ages 0 To 14

Save for later Position Country Incidence (per 100,000) 1 Finland 57.6 2 Sweden 43.1 3 Saudi Arabia 31.4 4 Norway 27.9 5 United Kingdom 24.5 6 USA 23.7 7 Australia 22.5 8 Kuwait 22.3 9 Denmark 22.2 10 Canada 21.7 11 Netherlands 18.6 12 Germany 18 12 New Zealand 18 14 Poland 17.3 15 Czech Republic 17.2 16 Estonia 17.1 17 Puerto Rico 16.8 18 Ireland 16.3 18 Montenegro 16.3 20 Malta 15.6 21 Luxembourg 15.5 22 Belgium 15.4 23 Cyprus 14.9 24 Iceland 14.7 25 Slovakia 13.6 26 Austria 13.3 27 Portugal 13.2 28 Spain 13 29 Serbia 12.9 30 United States Virgin Islands 12.8 31 France 12.2 32 Italy 12.1 32 Russian Federation 12.1 34 Qatar 11.4 35 Hungary 11.3 36 Slovenia 11.1 37 Israel 10.4 37 Greece 10.4 39 Bahamas 10.1 39 Sudan 10.1 41 Bulgaria 9.4 42 Switzerland 9.2 43 Croatia 9.1 44 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 9 45 Algeria 8.6 46 Uruguay 8.3 47 Ukraine 8.1 48 Egypt 8 49 Lithuania 7.8 50 Brazil 7.7 51 Latvia 7.5 52 Tunisia 7.3 53 Argentina 6.8 54 Chile 6.6 55 Dominica 5.7 56 Belarus 5.6 57 Romania 5.4 58 Georgia 4.6 59 India 4.2 60 Macedonia 3.9 61 Taiwan 3.8 62 Iran 3.7 63 Antigua and Barbuda 3.5 63 Bosnia and Herzegovina 3.5 65 Jordan 3.2 66 Nigeria 2.9 67 Oman 2.5 67 Singapore 2.5 69 Japan 2.4 70 Cuba 2.3 71 Barbados 2 71 China, Hong Kong SAR 2 73 Mexico 1.5 74 Mauritius 1.4 75 Colombia 1.3 76 Uzbekistan 1.2 76 Tajikistan 1.2 78 Republic of Korea 1.1 79 United Republic of Tanzania 0.9 79 Paraguay 0.9 81 Zambia 0.8 82 China 0.6 83 Dominican Republic 0.5 83 Pakistan 0.5 83 Peru 0.5 86 Ethiopia 0.3 86 Thailand 0.3 88 Papua New Guinea 0.1 88 Venezuala 0.1 Source: The International Diabetes Federation. The data on estimates for incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children aged 0 to 14 comes from theInternational Diabetes Federation’s Diabetes Atlas, with the estimates being for 2011. The l Continue reading >>

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Nearly 12 percent of Chinese adults (about 113.9 million people) are suffering from diabetes, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on Tuesday. Based on nearly 99,000 samples taken in 2010, the study estimates that 11.6 percent of Chinese adults are diabetic, making China’s rate of prevalence of the disease the highest in the world. “The prevalence of diabetes has increased significantly in recent decades and is now reaching epidemic proportions in China,” the researchers write. JAMA notes that diabetes rates in China have risen dramatically over the past decades. While less than one percent of the Chinese population was diabetic in 1980, that number rose to 5.5 percent in 2001, 9.7 percent in 2007 and 11.6 percent today. The JAMA study also indicates that the prevalence of the disease has increased as economic development has given way to overweight and obesity. “Diabetes is a societal and a health care challenge due to complex interplays among genetic, perinatal, lifestyle, and environmental factors, to name but a few. Rapid modernization has resulted in an obesogenic environment characterized by food abundance, physical inactivity, and psychosocial stress,” Dr. Juliana Chan of the Chinese University of Hong Kong writes in an editorial accompanying the report. Only one in three patients was aware of his or her condition, and a mere one in four received treatment. “Even when the individual becomes aware of his or her risk conditions, the health care systems in many developing areas are not designed to manage and support a person’s multiple health needs for 30 to 40 years or more,” Chan added. According to the International Diabetes Federation, more than 371 million suffer from diabetes worldwide, an Continue reading >>

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