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High Tech Diabetes Tools

U.s. Diabetes Patients Are About To Get Some High-tech Relief

U.s. Diabetes Patients Are About To Get Some High-tech Relief

User-friendly devices to replace old, ‘barbaric’ tools ‘This is a crossroads for diabetes technology:’ analyst Diabetes devices may be having their iPhone moment. For decades, the daily routine of diabetics involved painful needles, finger-pricking lancets and imprecise glucose meters. Now, manufacturers have begun incorporating the slick and consumer-friendly designs of Silicon Valley, linking to phones and other tech devices. “This is a crossroads for diabetes technology,’’ said Raj Denhoy, an analyst at Jefferies in New York. September marked a breakthrough in the U.S., as regulators approved the first glucose-monitoring system that doesn’t need a blood sample, the FreeStyle Libre by Abbott Laboratories. The new devices do away with fingerpricks, changing an unpleasant, several-times-a-day routine into quiet monitoring in the background through a sensor worn on the back of the upper arm. Other companies have been left behind. Johnson & Johnson is closing its insulin-pump unit after failing to keep up with Medtronic Plc. DexCom Inc., the current leader in glucose-monitoring systems, lost a third of its market value on Sept. 28 after Abbott’s Libre got approval. On DexCom’s earnings conference call Wednesday executives, peppered with questions about the Libre, said the company hopes to introduce its own fingerprick-free device before the end of 2018. The comments about next-generation monitors helped assuage investors’ concerns about DexCom’s prospects, sending the stock up 9.5 percent in the two trading days following the results. “Companies who succeed will be those who can figure out this convergence of health care and technology,” said Arda Ural, a partner at Ernst & Young LLP in New York. “And they’re very different animals to bring Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tools & Technology

Diabetes Tools & Technology

Diabetes treatment has changed considerably over the years with the development of new medical technologies. From talking meters to continuous glucose monitors, learn about some of the recent innovations and find out how they can help you achieve better control. Learn about eight recent diabetes breakthroughs that are changing how the condition is managed Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at insulin delivery devices that have recently hit the market Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at mobile apps, glucose gel, and sweetener Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at glucometers and CGMs that have recently hit the market If you have diabetes, you must consistently monitor your diet, lifestyle, and glucose levels. Fortunately, technology for diabetes can help Heres our lineup of some of the best new diabetes products, tools, and gadgets that have hit the market in the last year Continue reading >>

Three New Digital Tools For People With Diabetes

Three New Digital Tools For People With Diabetes

Three New Digital Tools for People with Diabetes With a myriad of high-tech tools having come out in the past two years, people with diabetes and health-care professionals have many options for managing their care. Now, three recently-launched tools and applicationss will provide more help to pharmacists so that they can help people with diabetes in managing their disease. Novo Nordisk and Glooko said they will work together to deliver personalized digital health solutions for people with diabetes. Building on Glookos mobile and web platforms, the two companies aim to help diabetics with blood sugar management and treatment adherence. The partnerships joint offerings will also assist health-care professionals to engage and manage patients with the aid of population-wide data reporting, the two companies said in a statement . Denmark-based Glooko enables people with diabetes to more easily track and better manage their condition using mobile, web, and cloud technology. Its mobile health app enables individuals to synchronize their data from a majority of the popular diabetes and exercise devices, including blood sugar monitors. Glookos partnership with Novo Nordisk aims to empower tens of millions of patients with digital tools to make diabetes management easier, said Rick Altinger, Glooko CEO. We look forward to delivering jointly-branded capabilities that will enhance the collaboration between patient and health-care professionals and enable us to provide joint offerings to people living with diabetes around the world. Blue Mesa Health recently rolled out Transformemos , a digital diabetes prevention program for the Hispanic/Latino community. Transformemosis a digital diabetes prevention program based on our already-successful behavior change program: participants rec Continue reading >>

'smart' Diabetes Technology On The Horizon - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

'smart' Diabetes Technology On The Horizon - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

Diabetes Ireland > Latest Articles > Smart Diabetes Technology on the Horizon Smart Diabetes Technology on the Horizon People with diabetes today spend hours each week carefully tracking blood glucose levels, food intake and physical exercise to calculate when and how much insulin should be injected into their bodies. Living with diabetes requires constant vigilance and a strong sense of self-determination and efficacy. While diabetes research has made enormous strides in the past decade, those living with the condition are still faced with the daily reality of the fact that a cure remains elusive. As such, much of the current research has centered on the improvement of maintenance technologies. While the implementation of these treatments an artificial pancreas, insulin inhaler, and a myriad of mobile apps, among others has been less efficient than most would say is ideal, the proliferation of smart devices has positioned such new technologies to play a pivotal role in the way diabetes is controlled and monitored. With a health condition like diabetes, where the individual is responsible for round-the-clock self-monitoring, there are many benefits to come from care that is both increasingly automated and personalised for the individual. While many of us already use phone apps to help manage glucose levels, there are a multitude of other devices in development striving to offer new ways for both people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes to gain better control over this condition. Many of these new tools are influenced by healthcares recent progression towards greater patient-physician connectivity. The increased usage of mobile apps and patient portals to engage with people with diabetes allows researchers access to a plethora of useful data for analysis. Utilising techno Continue reading >>

High-tech Diabetes Self-care

High-tech Diabetes Self-care

Say good-bye to tedious record-keeping with a pencil and paper. A new breed of high-tech diabetes tools makes monitoring blood glucose, diet, exercise and medication easier than ever. Here, a look at what some of the latest products can do for you, and how to get started using them today. The easier it is to record your blood-glucose readings, the easier it may be for you to stay on track, says Donna Tomky, M.S.N., R.N., C.D.E and immediate past-president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Telcare BGM. Using test strips, the Telcare BGM takes a reading and automatically sends results to an iPhone app or website accessible to your doctor or caregiver. You can create charts of your readings and the meter will alert you if they are high or low,allowing your doctor to respond quickly and send recommendations directly to you. ($150, plus 50 test strips for $55.95, telcare.com) iBGStar. A small, affordable option, the iBGStar is about the size of a USB drive. Use it on its own as a tiny meter, or plug it into an iPhone or iPod to make notes, transmit glucose levels and chart your progress using the diabetes-management appessentially turningyour iPhone into a high-functioning glucose meter. ($99, bgstar.com) Glooko. If you've got a glucose meter and an iPhone, buy a Glooko cable and download a free iPhone Logbook Charts app. You can send readings from your meter to the app. Unlike apps that are tailored to one particular type of meter, Glooko works with 17 different brands. ($39.95, glooko.com) Pocket A1c. The Pocket A1c evaluates whether your A1c reading (a three-month total of blood sugar concentration) is high, then converts it into suggested daily blood-glucose targets to help you reach your goals. (Free, itunes.apple.com) Diabetes apps can offer motivatio Continue reading >>

New High-tech Tools To Help Control Diabetes

New High-tech Tools To Help Control Diabetes

This content is selected and controlled by WebMD's editorial staff and is supported by Walgreens. High-Tech Tools to Help You Handle Diabetes By Susan Bernstein, Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on October 14, 2017 Because of your diabetes, you'll want to know about tools that help you track what you eat, what your blood sugar levels are, how much you exercise, and how you feel each day. Some of these include: Smartphone, tablet, or computer apps to log your blood sugar or meals and snacks Devices that test your sugar levels every few minutes "Smart pumps" that give you insulin as your body needs it Texts, calls, or emails that remind you to test or to take your medicine If you notice patterns in your levels over time, the information can help you and your doctor better manage yourdiabetes. To find out more, you or your doctor might use a device called a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that can test your blood sugar every 5 minutes throughout the day. It tests through tiny fibers on a patch stuck on yourskin. Results are sent wirelessly to a small monitor or insulin pump. The results can help you and your doctor spot spikes after you eat certain foods or work out, or while yousleep, says Robert Vigersky, MD, medical director of Medtronic Diabetes. A continuous glucose monitor doesn't take the place of old-school testing, though. The device's maker says you need at least one finger stick every 12 hours to set the device, and suggests regular testing three to four times a day to make sure the numbers match up. New, "smartinsulinpumps" that can sync with a CGM are great for people withtype 1 diabetes, Vigersky says. "If your sugar goes too low, it will stop aninsulininfusion for 2 hours," he says. Smart pumps can help you avoid dangerous dips in your blood sugar. New smartp Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tech 'spectations For 2017

Diabetes Tech 'spectations For 2017

It's a New Year's tradition here at the 'Mine to look ahead at the new technology and tools we expect to see coming down the pike in the year ahead. Even before the calendar rolled over, we knew 2017 would be a big year -- with the market launch this Spring of the first-ever hybrid closed loop system from Medtronic. This ushers in a new era of Artificial Pancreas tech, and that's just one of the exciting developments we can expect this year. We've been listening to earnings calls and talking with company execs, industry insiders and PR teams to get a sense of what else is on the horizon, compiled in the following report. (In case you're curious about our previous predictions, you can have a look back at our reports for 2016, 2015, and 2014.) Artificial Pancreas Systems Medtronic's Minimed 670G: Approved by the FDA in September 2016, this will be a first-of-its-kind system that can adjust insulin delivery accord to CGM values to keep users as close as possible to a set target of 120 mg/dL. The device itself will have a vertical design format with color screen. While it unfortunately doesn't accommodate data-sharing (!), the Minimed 670G uses the new Guardian 3 CGM sensor that MedT claims has improved accuracy and reliability. The system is set up to communicate directly with the Bayer Contour Link 2.4 fingerstick meter that Ascensia introduced in 2016, allowing for remote bolusing from the meter. Read our full coverage for more details on the 670G. In terms of launch date, so far Medtronic has only said "early 2017." Tandem's First-Gen Automated Insulin Delivery (AID): Makers of the t:slim insulin pump have plans to get their own first-generation closed loop system to market by end of 2017. This one will feature the Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) that in many ways Continue reading >>

High-tech Diabetes Self-care

High-tech Diabetes Self-care

Technological advances in continuous glucose monitoring systems, mobile apps, and online services are transforming diabetes self-management. Managing diabetes can seem like a full-time job for many clients and patients, but as with any job, having the proper tools can streamline the work and reduce frustration. However, which tools work best depends on the individual. Technology is one of those tools that can play an important role in helping people self-manage diabetes. Yet, it requires a flexible approach on the part of both dietitians and their patients. Patients have to be willing to make some changes in their self-care routines, and dietitians need to determine which technologies may work best for their clients. "The management strategies you use with a person with diabetes depend on many factors, such as type of diabetes, level of control, the person's goals and, most importantly, their willingness and ability to actively self-manage," says Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, CDE, the 2015 president-elect of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) and the author of Eat Out, Eat Well: The Guide to Eating Healthy in Any Restaurant and its companion app, Eat Out WellRestaurant Nutrition Finder from the American Diabetes Association. "There are people with prediabetes who need to focus on losing a few pounds and keeping that weight off, so their focus may be counting calories, fat grams, and steps. And there are people with type 1 diabetes who take four or five shots of insulin a day or are using an insulin pump along with a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). They're willing to share their data with their health care provider for consideration and feedback." One of the most significant technological advances in diabetes self-care in recent years has been the develop Continue reading >>

11 Gadgets To Help Manage Diabetes

11 Gadgets To Help Manage Diabetes

Managing diabetes is a full-time job, and you need the right tools for the task. Check out this list of gadgets that can help. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Managing type 2 diabetes is a full-time job, and having the right tools can make it a lot easier. Choosing wisely from the wide array of gadgets on the market can help bring you the best results in managing your diabetes. It's important that you're comfortable with and like the tools you use. When researchers asked 35 people with diabetes to use either a smartphone app or no app to track their blood sugar for 12 weeks, they discovered that the people who said they liked the app they were using also had better A1C numbers . These findings were published in the June 2014 issue of Diabetes & Metabolism Journal . Here are 11 gadgets to consider adding to your diabetes management toolbox: Glucose tablet holder. Because some medications or a new exercise routine can put you at risk for low blood sugar, you want to carry a source of glucose with you, says Betsy Sullivan, RN, a certified diabetes educator with the Penn Rodebaugh Diabetes Center in Philadelphia. If you choose glucose pills, a tablet holder both protects them and makes them easier to find in your purse or bag. Pill organizer. Keeping track of medications and your dosing schedule is easier with a plastic organizer. There are styles with one or more compartments for each day of the week. If you have a smartphone, set an alarm to go off every time you need to take your meds. In the future, you may be able to access a digital pill organizer that can even keep your doctor informed about when you take your medications, according to research published in Continue reading >>

7 Innovations That Are Changing The Way We Manage Diabetes, A Disease That Affects 371 Million People Worldwide

7 Innovations That Are Changing The Way We Manage Diabetes, A Disease That Affects 371 Million People Worldwide

It's been almost a century since researchers discovered a way to treat diabetes. Since then, there have been a number of medical and technological advances that aim to make the lives of people living with diabetes — both type 1 and type 2 — more manageable. Around the globe, the group of conditions affects 371 million people worldwide, a number that's expected to increase to 552 million by 2030. From monitoring blood sugar levels — a taxing experience that people with diabetes must grow used to doing every day — to ways that make insulin easier to deliver, here are some of the innovations that are changing the way we manage diabetes. Medtronic created the world's first 'artificial pancreas.' In September, the FDA approved a device that's often referred to as an "artificial pancreas" for use in people with type 1 diabetes over age 14. The device, made by Medtronic, is called the MiniMed 670G, and it works by automatically monitoring a person's blood sugar levels and administering insulin as needed — no constant checking and injecting required. That way, it can act like a pancreas, the organ in our bodies that in healthy people is able to moderate our blood sugar levels by pumping out insulin that can process the sugars found in food. Livongo is making a glucose monitor that can get software updates just like your phone. "No one cares about the technology," Glen Tullman, the CEO of California-based startup Livongo and whose son has Type 1 diabetes, told Business Insider. "They simply want to live their life." On Wednesday, the company added the capability for the monitor to receive software updates, eliminating the need for people to constantly upgrade to new glucose meters when the technology advances. Livongo also offers the testing strips the machine uses for Continue reading >>

Will High-tech Skin Put An End To Needle Sticks For Diabetes?

Will High-tech Skin Put An End To Needle Sticks For Diabetes?

Painful and inconvenient, needle sticks are part of daily life for many people with diabetes. Wouldn’t it be great if there were some high-tech wearable that could monitor blood glucose levels continuously and noninvasively — that is, without the need to pierce the skin? We’re not there yet, but we’re getting closer. The FDA just approved a skin patch with a small through-the-skin wire that delivers glucose readings wirelessly to a wand-like reader — but the patch must be replaced every 10 days. And researchers at MIT are doing very preliminary research on tattoos that change appearance to indicate changing glucose levels. Now University of Chicago scientists have taken these ideas a step further. Working with rodents, they’ve endowed skin itself with the ability to track blood glucose and are at work on a system that could give at-a-glance insights into all kinds of blood values. The team, led by cell biologist Dr. Xiaoyang Wu, used stem cells and the gene-editing technique CRISPR to create skin cells that emit fluorescent light in a particular pattern as blood glucose levels rise. The light is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected by a tiny electronic sensor that might be embeddable in a wristwatch or bracelet. A GENTLE HEADS-UP If this preliminary research pans out, the skin sensor-and-device combination could make possible continuous, noninvasive monitoring of blood levels of cholesterol, sodium, iron, bilirubin, and liver and kidney enzymes as well as glucose. A gentle vibration, ring, or flash would alert wearers when levels got out of whack — and possibly alert their doctors or caregivers. The system Wu is developing might even be able to spot tumor cells in the blood that indicate the presence of cancer — and Wu suspects it might also be Continue reading >>

High Tech Diabetes Management

High Tech Diabetes Management

Home Inside Holistic Pain High Tech Diabetes Management Individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes make up about 9% of the U.S. population. This is up from 8% in 2010. Seniors make up the largest group, with diabetes rates currently reaching about 11 million adults over the age of 65. In 2014, diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Type 1 diabetes is commonly called juvenile diabetes and is characterized by the bodys inability to produce insulin. Patients with this form of diabetes are reliant on insulin injections and some even use implantable pumps to help regulate insulin in the body. Type 2 diabetes is typically caused by poor health and weight management, as well as the bodys increasing inability to process sugar. It can often be controlled with diet and exercise but some patients may need to add medication to their routine. Technology such as implantable pumps can be very useful for diabetes management, but they dont come without risks. In 2008, cybersecurity specialist and Type 1 diabetes patient Jay Radcliff hacked into his own device on stage at the Black Hat conference. He wanted to show how vulnerable these devices could be so these companies could see how to create better security for technology that can save lives. His research has implications beyond diabetes and can help medical device manufacturers create better, more secure technology tools to help with a variety of conditions. In 2013, Radcliff spoke with QMed about his experience and what it could mean to the future of diabetes management. Implantable pumps arent the only forms of technology that can help patients better manage their diabetes. A variety of products and apps can help someone maintain a healthy balance in their lives. Smartphones are opening up an entirel Continue reading >>

Get Moving! High-tech Tools Offer Fun, Inexpensive, And Convenient Ways To Exercise More

Get Moving! High-tech Tools Offer Fun, Inexpensive, And Convenient Ways To Exercise More

Get Moving! High-Tech Tools Offer Fun, Inexpensive, and Convenient Ways to Exercise More High-tech tools for exercise motivation: use and role of technologies such as the Internet, mobile applications, social media, and video games. By Tate and colleagues. Diabetes Spectrum 2015;38:453459 What is the problem and what is known about it so far? Getting regular exercise is an important part of diabetes management. The American Diabetes Association recommends aerobic exercise such as brisk walking for about 30 minutes per day on most days of the week and strength training such as weight lifting at least twice per week. However, most people with diabetes do not get enough exercise. Some people join group programs in their communities to help them become more active, but such programs are not available everywhere and can be expensive or inconvenient. Luckily, many tools that use technologies such as the Internet, smartphones, and video game systems are now available to help people get more exercise. The authors wanted to review the various types of high-tech tools that may be helpful for people trying to get more exercise or make other healthy lifestyle changes. What were the main points of the article? Most people have access to the Internet and cell phones, although older adults tend to use such technologies less than younger adults. Studies have shown that interactive high-tech tools for managing diabetes risk factors can have positive effects on A1C (a measure of glucose control) and weight and can improve health outcomes for people with diabetes. The Internet, accessed either by computer or smartphone, has been the main technology used to promote exercise. However, self-monitoring devices such as FitBit, mobile phone applications ("apps"), and video games such as Wii Fi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology Moves Closer To Making Life Easier For Patients

Diabetes Technology Moves Closer To Making Life Easier For Patients

For people with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels in a normal range – not too high or too low – is a lifelong challenge. New technologies to ease the burden are emerging rapidly, but insurance reimbursement challenges, supply shortages, and shifting competition make it tough for patients to access them quickly. One new product is a fast-acting insulin from Novo Nordisk. It is designed to help to minimize the high blood sugar spikes that often occur when people with diabetes eat a meal containing carbohydrates. This new formulation, branded "Fiasp," adds niacinamide (vitamin B3), which roughly doubles the speed of initial insulin absorption compared to current fast-acting insulins taken at mealtime. This new insulin hits the bloodstream in under three minutes. Another advance is Abbott's new monitoring device called the FreeStyle Libre Flash. It's new in the U.S. but has been available in Europe since 2014. It's a round patch with a catheter that is inserted on the arm for up to 10 days and a durable scanning device that the user waves over the patch to read the level of sugar in their tissues, which reflects the blood sugar level. The Libre works a bit differently than the two currently available continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) made by Dexcom and Medtronic. The Libre doesn't require users to prick their fingers for blood tests to calibrate it, whereas users of the other monitors must perform twice-daily fingerstick calibrations. Also, the Libre is approved for longer wear – 10 days (14 in Europe) versus seven days for the two current CGMs. And, it is likely to be considerably less expensive, although Abbott isn't providing cost information for the U.S. just yet. In Europe, the Libre system costs about four Euros a day (about $4.70). But, unlike the current d Continue reading >>

The High-tech Business Of Diabetes

The High-tech Business Of Diabetes

Diabetes is big business. If you don't believe me, just Google the term "diabetes is big business" to see the headlines that agree. As of 2012, $245 billion was spent in the United States alone per year, and that has some people believing there will never be a cure—there is too much money in it. Maybe that's true, maybe not. But there are plenty of companies out there making products intended to help those afflicted. What Is Diabetes? Here's the quick, highly over-simplified primer on the disease if you're not up to speed. Diabetes mellitus, more often called just diabetes, maybe even DM, or "the diabeetus" if you're a fan of Wilford Brimley, comes in a few forms. The first is called Type 1 (aka T1), a chronic autoimmune disorder where the pancreas can no longer effectively produce the insulin hormone needed to manage the glucose (sugar) a person eats, mainly from carbohydrates. If you can't make insulin, your body gets hyperglycemia—that's too much sugar (high blood glucose). On the converse, diabetics are also easily prone to hypoglycemia—not enough sugar—caused by taking too much insulin (thus the term "insulin shock"), or even missing a meal or getting too much activity. Type 1 used to be called juvenile diabetes because you can get it as a kid and then you have it the rest of your life. T1s are entirely dependent on insulin from an outside source; and taking the right dosage means constantly monitoring blood glucose level. There is no known cause of T1, but it's likely a mix of genetics and environment. Type 2 (T2) diabetes was once considered "adult-onset diabetes," but can occur in kids. Patient's bodies can make insulin, typically, but develop a resistance to it; then may stop altogether. Sometimes T2s need insulin injections, sometimes just diet adjustm Continue reading >>

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