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High Gestational Diabetes Numbers

Gestational Diabetes: Troubleshooting High Readings

Gestational Diabetes: Troubleshooting High Readings

Copyright © 1998 [email protected]. All rights reserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consult your health provider. This particular web section is designed to help present some ideas for coping with/preventing higher readings. It should be re-emphasized that nothing herein should be considered medical advice. Contents What to Do If You Get a High Reading: Figuring Possible Causes What If You Just Have a High Reading, Without Any Real Rhyme or Reason? What Then? What If My Fasting Numbers Are Somewhat High? Is There Anything I Can Do To Help? What If My Post-Meal Numbers Are Somewhat High? Is There Anything I Can Do To Help? Trouble-Shooting High Readings: Some Ideas What To Do If You Get a High Reading: Figuring Possible Causes What do you do if you get a higher reading than you are supposed to? First off, don't panic. There are any number of factors that can cause an incorrectly high reading, and you need to rule these out before confirming the high reading. Always re-test to confirm a high number! You need to know if there was an error of some kind. The very first thing you do if you get a high number is to go wash your hands thoroughly and then re-test. Any bits of food on your fingers can significantly affect your numbers. A residue of juice or a drop of fruit pulp on your hand could elevate your readings tremendously. Other substances on your hands might also possibly affect your readings, so washing your hands really well before doing a reading is very, very important. (Kmom's story: I had a couple of readings that were high; upon reflection I realized that I had been cutting up grapes for my toddler before the measurement and gotten busy and forgotten to wash my hands before testing. Wh Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High blood sugar levels are where your blood sugar levels go over YOUR test target. So that is anything 0.1mmol/l over your target e.g. if your target is 7.8mmol and you get 7.9mmol/l, this is classed as an over target reading or high blood sugar level. Bearing in mind that test targets vary all over the UK and Ireland, what is classed as a high reading for one person, maybe still within target levels for someone else. What to do if you get high blood sugar levels Re-test your blood sugar levels Re-wash your hands in JUST water and re-test your blood sugar levels. It is very easy to touch something, even your face or hair and contaminate our hands before testing. Many soaps and sanitisers can have ingredients which leave residue on the skin which can give false high readings and so it is important to wash hands in just water before re-testing. If levels are still high Record all the results so that your diabetes team can review them and what you ate so that you can review what may have caused the spike in your blood sugar levels. Drink plenty of water and walk or be as active as possible for 20 mins or longer. Drinking water helps to flush excess sugars from the body and exercise has an insulin type effect on the body. Communicate with your team Each diabetes team may give different recommendations as to when to contact them, but the general guidance given and also what we recommend is to contact your team after 3 over target readings within a week. Don't wait until your next scheduled appointment if you're getting over target readings, give your team a call to discuss it with them. Some teams will ask you to come in earlier to start medication or insulin, others may fax a prescription through to your GP surgery or Pharmacy for you to collect and start. Other teams may Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes does not increase the risk of birth defects or the risk that the baby will be diabetic at birth. Also called gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), this type of diabetes affects between 3% and 20% of pregnant women. It presents with a rise in blood glucose (sugar) levels toward the end of the 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy. In 90% if cases, it disappears after the birth, but the mother is at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Cause It occurs when cells become resistant to the action of insulin, which is naturally caused during pregnancy by the hormones of the placenta. In some women, the pancreas is not able to secrete enough insulin to counterbalance the effect of these hormones, causing hyperglycemia, then diabetes. Symptoms Pregnant women generally have no apparent diabetes symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms occur: Unusual fatigue Excessive thirst Increase in the volume and frequency of urination Headaches Importance of screening These symptoms can go undetected because they are very common in pregnant women. Women at risk Several factors increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes: Being over 35 years of age Being overweight Family members with type 2 diabetes Having previously given birth to a baby weighing more than 4 kg (9 lb) Gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Belonging to a high-risk ethnic group (Aboriginal, Latin American, Asian or African) Having had abnormally high blood glucose (sugar) levels in the past, whether a diagnosis of glucose intolerance or prediabetes Regular use of a corticosteroid medication Suffering from ancanthosis nigricans, a discoloration of the skin, often darkened patches on the neck or under the arms Screening The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Gui Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Those Who Had It - Circle Of Moms

Gestational Diabetes Those Who Had It - Circle Of Moms

All Communities > Welcome to Circle of Moms!! > gestational diabetes those who had it Sonia - posted on 09/12/2011 ( 96 moms have responded ) I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 26 weeks and there are times that I have some high numbers. I am concerned that I am affecting the baby as far as development. The ultrasound has said breathing is fine and baby is not to big. Those who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are your kids healthy? Did you have high numbers sometimes? This is my second pregnancy with GD. I asked the Doctor at what point does the sugars start to affect (development wise) my baby. It isn't until you are over 200 that it will start having long term effects on the baby, including running the risk of the baby having diabetes when he/she is born. Anything under 200 will not have lasting effects on the kiddo, however they do want you to try and stay under that 120, because constantly having higher numbers can effect other things like your kidneys and liver. It can also help increase the risk of your placenta deteriorating early (a risk for anyone with GD even with sugars under control) It you have an occasional high sugar 120-140, they will just have you look at what you ate, if you start having them more consistently they will want to change your medication. if you are on a pill form, toward the end of your pregnancy, you may get switched to insulin, as the bigger the placenta the more it interferes with the liver's production of insulin. weird fact: just because you have GD this preggo, does not mean you will have it next preggo. I was on Glyburide from the first trimester on both pregnancies. (They can raise your dose up to 20mg a day, if you need more you will switch to insulin) One my first pregnancy, I switched to Insulin for the last Continue reading >>

I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Having A Problem Keeping My Glucose Down.

I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Having A Problem Keeping My Glucose Down.

I had gestational diabetes with both of my pregancies. I know it isn't easy but you definetly need to watch what you eat and exercise. I was not put on insulin this last pregnancy I was put on a pill that I took in the morning before I ate and ended up having to take one at night to. The doctors main concern is when you have the baby, they could have problems with their sugar. My daughter came out and ended up her sugar dropped and she couldn't come out of the nursery until it was stable. With both of my pregnancies I wasn't able to see my baby until 24 hrs. My son ended up having fluid on his lungs, and my daughter had issues with her sugar. Try your best on watching what you eat and try and exercise. Another issue is the babies weight. My son was 10 lbs 6 oz, my daughter was only 8lbs 10oz. Not trying to worry you but big babies can happen especailly with gestational diabetes. Good Luck. I have Type 1 Diabetes, I am 23 weeks pregnant and I don't know if anyone has told you this...but the pancreas makes insulin and it is a hormone that you need to keep your blood sugar normal. When you are pregnant your body requires more insulin to preform the body functions. The amount of insulin you need changes up until you are about 36 weeks pregnant and then it just evens out again. They have no idea why but it just happens. I don't know if it is the same way for Gestational Diabetes, but i just thought you might want to know this information if it is the same. But you also should know that any white breads will raise your sugar and same with sweat things. Not to mention that salty foods can actually make you feel like you are having a high blood sugar but it is just the need to drink a ton more water. Because of the diabetes you will need like twice as much water as you would if Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes High Levels

Gestational Diabetes High Levels

I'm 32 weeks on sunday and was diagnosed with GD at 12 weeks. So far I have been succeeding with just diet control. I have a scan coming up on Monday that the dr wanted to cancel because they're so happy with my numbers so far (i said i still want to do it) BUT unfortunately since Tuesday I've had fasting level of 5.2 (need to be below 5.1), after breakfast and lunch is under but still higher than previous numbers but dinner I've been really over. Last night was 7.9 and tonight was 8.7. I need to be below 6.7. I haven't changed what I'm eating and I'm finding this really upsetting as I've gone this far with diet control. This makes me really scared for my scan on Monday. I'm so scared he's really big and I'm really scared how the drs will be Monday afternoon when they see my numbers. I've been so good and rarely ever have a bad meal. I feel like this is somehow my fault... Has anyone experienced this or have any advice? Pregnancy hormones are making me very upset Firstly dont stress, a few high readings arnt going to instantly make your baby big especially when you have been controlling your bgl so well since 12 weeks. Im also at 33 weeks and my numbers have just gone u p slightly too. its nothing you have done wrong so dont blame yourself. As the placenta grows, so does your insulin resistance. thats why blood glucose gets harder to control later in the pregnancy. Despite eating the same things. ive had to switch my morning cereal (which was low GI) to toast which is also low GI. for some reasonthe toast doesnt spike my bgl like the cereal started doing. Are you enrolled in a diabetes clinic? if so call them with your numbers. if not wait till you see your drs monday. in the meantime try and get some excercise in after dinner and increase your water intake. ive found Continue reading >>

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

Blood glucose control is key to having a healthy baby A diagnosis of gestational diabetes can cast a shadow over the joys of pregnancy. While the vast majority of these cases end with a healthy baby and mom, gestational diabetes (high blood glucose during pregnancy in a woman who has never had type 1 or type 2 diabetes) does increase risks to the health of both baby and mother. Keeping blood glucose under control is crucial for women with gestational diabetes to help safeguard their babies and themselves. Gestational diabetes is caused by issues that arise as part of a normal pregnancy: hormonal changes and weight gain. Women whose bodies can't compensate for these changes by producing enough of the hormone insulin, which ushers glucose from the blood into cells to produce energy, develop high blood glucose and gestational diabetes. Overweight mothers are at a greater risk for the condition. In the United States, gestational diabetes is reported in somewhere between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies, but it is now believed that the condition affects 18 percent of women in pregnancy. The larger number is the result of new criteria for diagnosis, not just skyrocketing rates. The American Diabetes Association began recommending this year that gestational diabetes be diagnosed with only one abnormal test result rather than two, the previous method, and this is causing more cases to be detected. Gestational diabetes usually appears roughly halfway through pregnancy, as the placenta puts out large amounts of "anti-insulin" hormones. Women without known diabetes should be screened for gestational diabetes 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancies. (If high blood glucose levels are detected earlier in pregnancy, the mother-to-be may actually have type 2 diabetes, rather than gestati Continue reading >>

Fasting Numbers Always Too High

Fasting Numbers Always Too High

My fasting numbers are always elevated anywhere from 101-130. My numbers during the day are usually in the 110-120 range one hour after the first bite of my meal. I've experimented with different bed time snacks and nothing seems to work. My nutritionist suggested Greek yogurt with granola. I get the lowest numbers with that but I cannot get below 100. Any suggestions for snacks that have helped anyone with this problem? I'm so frustrated. I feel like they will suggest medication and I really really do not want to have to take any. It complicates things so much more! : ( Same thing happened to me and I was put on meds, however after suggestions from others on this board and a Facebook board I follow someone suggested a cheese stick and a snickers ice cream bar. I tried that and my fastings are NEVER close to 90 now How long are you fasting? When do u eat the yogurt and when do Uncheck in morning? I eventually had to just go on Metformin at night. It's not the end of the world. You can only do what you can do. I was in your position last month. Literally two weeks of crazy magic tricks trying to bring my fasting numbers under control. I fought meds w my doctor and even got a second opinion. Now I'm on bedtime insulin and I feel so much better. I can actually sleep without terrorizing myself with what my numbers will be and what trick I'm going to try tomorrow night. Insulin is safe in pregnancy bc it doesn't cross the placenta. Not your fault, fasting numbers are the hardest to manage and most indicative of the problem. Good luck. Been there. And one of my tricks was to eat around 2-3am so I could bring my numbers down. Which meant waking up every few hours to check the clock, eventually eating, then staying awake for like an hour bc I just ate. Nightmare process. Find Continue reading >>

Help! I’ve Got Gestational Diabetes And My Blood Glucose Readings Are High

Help! I’ve Got Gestational Diabetes And My Blood Glucose Readings Are High

You are here: Articles > Help! I’ve got gestational diabetes and my blood glucose readings are high What is gestational diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the amount of glucose in the blood is too high. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. It is diagnosed following a 2 hour Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) at around 26 to 28 weeks of pregnancy. This is a blood test ordered by your GP, obstetrician or antenatal clinic. This is considered a ‘universal test’, which means all pregnant women should have this test. What happens if my blood glucose levels stay too high in pregnancy? If high blood glucose levels (BGLs) are not treated, you and your baby may experience a number of problems. Women with poorly controlled BGLs are at much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus after pregnancy. This risk increases when women do not follow a healthy lifestyle during and after pregnancy or are unable to lose their pregnancy weight. A woman with GDM can have a baby that has an unhealthy growth pattern before it is born. Glucose crosses the placenta into your baby’s bloodstream. If your BGLs are high, your baby will receive high amounts of glucose. A baby’s insulin still works well meaning, even in utero, it is able to store this extra glucose and will grow faster and fatter. This means the growing baby can be at risk of: being a very large baby being born early being distressed during birth, and/or having low blood glucose levels at birth. Babies born to mums who have not had good blood glucose level management are also more likely to be overweight or obese into their adult lives, and have diabetes themselves. What do I do if I have a high BGL reading? If you have a high BGL it is important to work out why Continue reading >>

7 Techniques To Reduce Post-meal Spikes During Pregnancy

7 Techniques To Reduce Post-meal Spikes During Pregnancy

“Gary, I think I need more insulin at breakfast.” “Why do you say that, Julianne?” “Because I’m always having high readings right afterwards, and my obstetrician said I shouldn’t spike after I eat.” “And what happens after the spike?” “It usually comes down to normal before lunch. So do you think I should take more insulin?” After-meal blood sugar spikes can create quite a quandary for anyone with diabetes, particularly during pregnancy. Research has shown that fetal macrosomia (overgrowth of the baby) becomes more common when post-meal blood sugars exceed 120 mg/dl (6.7 mmol). With post-meal readings above 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol), the risk more than doubles from baseline. Fetal macrosomia can cause many problems during pregnancy. When the baby grows and develops too rapidly, it can lead to a premature and more complicated birth. It may also cause injuries to occur to the baby during delivery. Why do after-meal blood sugars have such a major influence on the baby’s growth? Nobody knows for certain. Perhaps, when the mother’s blood sugar “spikes” suddenly after meals, the baby is fed more sugar than its pancreas can “cover” with insulin, and high fetal blood sugar results. And because the baby’s kidneys spill almost all excess sugar from the baby’s bloodstream back into the amniotic fluid, the baby then drinks in the extra glucose and winds up growing more than it should. Suffice to say that post-meal blood sugar spikes are something to avoid during pregnancy. But how do we do it? Getting back to Julianne’s question, if she takes more insulin, she’ll probably wind up hypoglycemic before lunch. Luckily, we have some excellent techniques for preventing the after-meal highs without having to take more mealtime insulin. What Causes Sp Continue reading >>

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Diabetes that begins during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. This condition affects 5 to 9 percent of all pregnancies in the United States, and it is becoming more common, according to a July 2009 article in "American Family Physician." Pregnancy also aggravates preexisting type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar levels that are consistently too high during pregnancy can cause problems for both mother and infant. Video of the Day Diabetes during pregnancy increases the likelihood of congenital malformations, or birth defects, in infants, particularly if your blood glucose is poorly controlled for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. High blood sugars also contribute to excessive fetal growth, which makes labor and delivery difficult and increases the likelihood of infant fractures or nerve injuries. Large infants are more likely to be delivered via cesarean section. Newborns of diabetic mothers are at risk for respiratory distress, jaundice and dangerously low blood calcium or glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugars exceed specified levels following two glucose tolerance tests. The first test, usually performed between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy, involves drinking 50 g of a sugar solution and checking your blood glucose one hour later. If your level is above 130 mg/dL, your doctor will probably order a second glucose tolerance test that measures your blood glucose when you are fasting and then each hour for 2 to 3 hours after the test. A fasting glucose higher than 95 mg/dL, a one-hour level above 180 mg/dL, a two-hour level over 155 mg/dL or a three-hour measurement over 140 mg/dL is diagnostic of gestational diabetes. For pregnant women without diabetes, average fasting glucose levels vary between 69 mg/dL and 75 mg/ Continue reading >>

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