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High Ferritin Type 2 Diabetes

Serum Ferritin Has Correlation With Hba1c In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Serum Ferritin Has Correlation With Hba1c In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Serum ferritin has correlation with HbA1c in type 2 diabetic patients Find articles by Mohammad Saeed Behradmanesh Department of Internal Medicine, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran 1Clinical Biochemistry Research Center, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran 2Medical School, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran Address for correspondence: Dr. Mohammad Saeed Behradmanesh, Department of Internal Medicine, Hajar Hospital, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2013 Jan 22; Accepted 2013 Sep 24. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and ferritin are two acute phase reactants. CRP may be related to metabolic syndrome and ferritin which in turn could cause resistance to insulin and dysfunction of b cells of pancreases. The aim of the study was the evaluation of the relationship of these two acute phase reactants with some indices of diabetic control. In a quasi-experimental study, 67 patients with type 2 diabetes, serum CRP, ferritin, Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS), post prandial BS, Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), triglyceride, Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (LDL) and High Density Lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) were checked before and 3 months after the control of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. The mean age of the patients was 56.5 9.7 (30 to 82) years. There was no significant difference between CRP before and after study; however, serum ferritin significantly decreas Continue reading >>

Blood Letting In High-ferritin Type 2 Diabetes: Effects On Insulin Sensitivity And Beta-cell Function.

Blood Letting In High-ferritin Type 2 Diabetes: Effects On Insulin Sensitivity And Beta-cell Function.

Blood letting in high-ferritin type 2 diabetes: effects on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function. @article{FernndezReal2002BloodLI, title={Blood letting in high-ferritin type 2 diabetes: effects on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function.}, author={Jos{\'e} Manuel Fern{\'a}ndez-Real and Georgina Pe{\~n}arroja and Alfredo Sanabria Castro and Fernando Garc{\'i}a-Bragado and Ildefonso Hern{\'a}ndez-Aguado and Wifredo Ricart}, journal={Diabetes}, year={2002}, volume={51 4}, pages={ 1000-4 }} Iron-related insulin-resistance is improved by iron depletion or treatment with iron chelators. The aim of this study was to evaluate insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion after blood letting in patients who had high-ferritin type 2 diabetes and were randomized to blood letting (three phlebotomies [500 ml of blood] at 2-week intervals, group 1) or to observation (group 2). Insulin secretion and sensitivity were tested at baseline and 4 and 12 months thereafter. The two groups were matched CONTINUE READING Continue reading >>

Blood Letting In High-ferritin Type 2 Diabetes: Effects On Insulin Sensitivityand Beta-cell Function.

Blood Letting In High-ferritin Type 2 Diabetes: Effects On Insulin Sensitivityand Beta-cell Function.

Blood letting in high-ferritin type 2 diabetes: effects on insulin sensitivityand beta-cell function. Fernndez-Real JM(1), Pearroja G, Castro A, Garca-Bragado F, Hernndez-AguadoI, Ricart W. (1)Unit of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Nutrition, University Hospital of Girona Dr. Josep Trueta, Girona, Spain. [email protected] Iron-related insulin-resistance is improved by iron depletion or treatment withiron chelators. The aim of this study was to evaluate insulin sensitivity andinsulin secretion after blood letting in patients who had high-ferritin type 2diabetes and were randomized to blood letting (three phlebotomies [500 ml ofblood] at 2-week intervals, group 1) or to observation (group 2). Insulinsecretion and sensitivity were tested at baseline and 4 and 12 months thereafter.The two groups were matched for age, BMI, pharmacologic treatment, and chronicdiabetic complications. All patients were negative for C282Y mutation ofhereditary hemochromatosis. Baseline glycated hemoglobin (6.27 +/- 0.9% vs. 6.39 +/- 1.2%), insulin sensitivity (2.75 +/- 1.8 vs. 3.2 +/- 2.1 mg.dl(-1).min(-1)), and area under the curve for C-peptide (AUC(C-peptide); 38.7 +/- 11.6 vs. 37.6+/- 14.1 ng.ml(-1).min(-1)) were not significantly different between the twogroups of patients. Body weight, blood pressure, blood hematocrit levels, anddrug treatment remained essentially unchanged during the study period. Asexpected, serum ferritin, transferrin saturation index, and blood hemoglobindecreased significantly at 4 months only in patients who received blood letting. In parallel to this changes, blood HbA(1c) decreased significantly only in group 1 subjects (mean differences, -0.61; 95% CI, -0.17 to -1.048; P = 0.01).AUC(C-peptide) decreased by -10.2 +/- 6.3% after blood letting. In contrast, a10. Continue reading >>

Correlation Between Elevated Serum Ferritin And Hba1c In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus | Raj | International Journal Of Research In Medical Sciences

Correlation Between Elevated Serum Ferritin And Hba1c In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus | Raj | International Journal Of Research In Medical Sciences

Correlation between elevated serum ferritin and HbA1c in type 2 diabetes mellitus Background: Serum Ferritin, an acute phase reactant is a marker of iron stores in the body. Recent studies indicate that increased body iron stores and subclinical hemochromatosis has been associated with the development of glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and possibly the development of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and vascular dysfunction. This study was carried out to examine and establish a relationship between Serum Ferritin with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome and to examine whether a correlation between S. ferritin and FBS, HbA1c exists. Methods: 86 type 2 diabetes subjects (M:F - 57:29, mean age 54.39.2 years, mean BMI 24.28kg/m2) which included 24 patients with metabolic syndrome were studied and compared with controls. S. ferritin, Hb, ESR, FBS, PPBS, HbA1c and fasting lipid profile were measured. Results: Serum ferritin was significantly higher in diabetic patients when compared to controls and serum ferritin had a positive correlation with increasing duration of diabetes. Conclusions: There was a positive correlation between serum ferritin and FBS, HbA1c. There was no correlation between serum ferritin and age, sex, metabolic syndrome, coexistent hypertension, total cholesterol, LDL and serum triglycerides. Jiang R, Manson JE, Meigs JB, Ma J, Rifai N, Hu FB. Body iron stores in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in apparently healthy women. JAMA 2004;291:711-7. Thomas MC, MacIsaac RJ, Tsalamandris C, Jerums G. Elevated iron indices in patients with diabetes. Diabet Med 2004;21:798-802. Sharifi F, Sazandeh SH. Serum ferritin in type 2 diabetes and its relationship with HbA1c. Acta Med Iran 2004;42:142-5. Ford ES, Cogswell ME. Diabet Continue reading >>

Iron: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, Liver Diseases, Oxidative Stress And Mortality

Iron: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, Liver Diseases, Oxidative Stress And Mortality

IRON: DIABETES, METABOLIC SYNDROME, LIVER DISEASES, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND MORTALITY Insulin Resistance: Iron, GGT & Oxidative Stress As on other Science Library pages, we do not present a lengthy narrative on each affected body system or disease, but rather will briefly summarize or quote the most relevant take-home points and/or research conclusions from each study. Article titles are linked to abstracts archived at the U.S. National Library of Science. Our Iron Science Library pages include: The role of iron in diabetes and its complications (1) The full text of this 2007 article provides a good comprehensive review of the role of iron in diabetes. The authors introduce their discussion as follows: In this review, we discuss therole tissue iron and elevated body iron stores play in causing type 2 diabetes and the pathogenesis of its important complications, particularly diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease (CVD).In addition, we emphasize that iron overload is not a prerequisite for iron to mediate either diabetes or its complications. Important in its pathophysiology is the availability of so-called catalytic iron or iron that is available to participate in free radical reactions.[Health-e-Iron note;Figure 1from this review appears below] Figure 1Pathogenic pathways for iron in induction of diabetes. The role of iron in diabetes and its complications: response to Swaminathan (2) This 2007 full text comment on the above review adds important perspective to this discussion. This research group studied 2,499 individuals and confirmed that across a range from low through moderate and elevated ferritin (15 400 ng/mL). They reported thatboth Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) and diabetes occurred significantly more oftenwhen GGT was elevated(particularlyabove36 I/U) Continue reading >>

Elevated Serum Ferritin Level Is Associated With The Incident Type 2 Diabetes In Healthy Korean Men: A 4 Year Longitudinal Study.

Elevated Serum Ferritin Level Is Associated With The Incident Type 2 Diabetes In Healthy Korean Men: A 4 Year Longitudinal Study.

Generate a file for use with external citation management software. PLoS One. 2013 Sep 30;8(9):e75250. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0075250. eCollection 2013. Elevated serum ferritin level is associated with the incident type 2 diabetes in healthy Korean men: a 4 year longitudinal study. Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Elevated ferritin concentration has been implicated in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Accumulating evidence, mostly from studies conducted on western populations, has demonstrated a strong association between the elevated ferritin concentrations and incident type 2 diabetes. In Asian populations, however, the longitudinal studies investigating the association of elevated serum ferritin levels and type 2 diabetes are lacking. In present study, we aimed to determine whether elevated serum ferritin levels are related to the incident type 2 diabetes in healthy Korean men. This 4 year longitudinal observational study was conducted at the Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. The study population consisted of 2,029 men without type 2 diabetes who underwent routine health examination in 2007 (baseline) and 2011 (follow-up). Baseline serum ferritin concentrations were measured by chemiluminescent two-site sandwich immunoassay. In multiple-adjusted model, the relative risk (RR) for incident type 2 diabetes was significantly higher in highest compared with the lowest ferritin quartile category, even after adjusting for confounding variables including homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (RR = 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.27-3.72, P for trend = 0.013). These results demonstrated that elevated level of serum ferritin at baseline was associated with incid Continue reading >>

Circulating Ferritin Concentrations And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Japanese Individuals

Circulating Ferritin Concentrations And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Japanese Individuals

Circulating ferritin concentrations and risk of type 2 diabetes in Japanese individuals We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Circulating ferritin concentrations and risk of type 2 diabetes in Japanese individuals Shamima Akter, Akiko Nanri, [...], and Tetsuya Mizoue Higher iron storage has been linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but little is known about the mediator of this association. Here, we prospectively investigated the association between circulating ferritin, a marker of iron storage, and the incidence of type 2 diabetes among Japanese individuals. The participants were 4,754 employees who attended a comprehensive health checkup in 20082009 and donated blood for the study. During 5 years of follow up, diabetes was identified based on plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin and selfreport. Two controls matched to each case on sex, age and date of checkup were randomly chosen using density sampling, giving 327 cases and 641 controls with ferritin measurement. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio while adjusting for a series of potential confounders or mediators. Elevated serum ferritin levels were associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, with the hazard ratio adjusted for known risk factors in the highest vs lowest quartile of 1.42 (95% confidence interval: 1.031.96). This association was unchanged after adjustment for Creactive protein and Continue reading >>

Elevated Serum Ferritin Concentration Is Associated With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In A Chinese Population: A Prospective Cohort Study

Elevated Serum Ferritin Concentration Is Associated With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In A Chinese Population: A Prospective Cohort Study

Elevated serum ferritin concentration is associated with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population: A prospective cohort study Author links open overlay panel LingChena1 We aimed to evaluate the association between serum ferritin levels and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus risk in a Chinese population. This cohort study assessed 2225 Chinese individuals aged 2575years. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed using the 1999 World Health Organization definition with a median follow-up period of 20months. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for incident diabetes when serum ferritin concentrations increased by one standard deviation. During the follow-up period, 112 cases (62 men and 50 women) of type 2 diabetes mellitus were identified. Baseline serum ferritin levels were higher in the diabetes than the non-diabetes group. After adjusting for age, body mass index, waist circumference, mean arterial pressure, fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine transaminase and triglyceride levels, family history of diabetes mellitus, pork meat consumption, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, education, and annual household income, the hazard ratios for incident diabetes corresponding to one standard deviation increase in serum ferritin levels were 1.17 (95% CI 1.03, 1.34), 1.20 (95% CI 1.003, 1.43), and 1.03 (95% CI 0.82, 1.31) for the total population, men, and women, respectively. High serum ferritin levels were associated with a higher risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of traditional risk factors in the total population and men. Continue reading >>

Ferritin Concentrations, Metabolic Syndrome, And Type 2 Diabetes In Middle-aged And Elderly Chinese

Ferritin Concentrations, Metabolic Syndrome, And Type 2 Diabetes In Middle-aged And Elderly Chinese

Context: Elevated ferritin concentrations frequently cluster with well-established risk factors of diabetes including obesity, metabolic syndrome, chronic inflammation, and altered circulating adipokines. Few studies, however, have systematically evaluated the effect of these risk factors on ferritin-diabetes association, particularly in Chinese populations. Objective: We aimed to investigate, in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population, whether elevated ferritin concentrations are associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes and to what extent the associations were influenced by obesity, inflammation, and adipokines. Design and Methods: We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional survey of 3289 participants aged 5070 yr in Beijing and Shanghai in 2005. Fasting plasma ferritin, glucose, insulin, lipid profile, glycohemoglobin, inflammatory markers, adipokines, and dietary profile were measured. Results: Median ferritin concentrations were 155.7 ng/ml for men and 111.9 ng/ml for women. After multiple adjustment, the odds ratios (ORs) were substantially higher for type 2 diabetes (OR 3.26, 95% confidence interval 2.364.51) and metabolic syndrome [OR 2.80 (95% confidence interval 2.243.49)] in the highest ferritin quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile. These associations remained significant after further adjustment for dietary factors, body mass index, inflammatory markers, and adipokines. Conclusions: Elevated circulating ferritin concentrations were associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese independent of obesity, inflammation, adipokines, and other risk factors. Our data support the crucial role of iron overload for metabolic diseases, even in a country with Continue reading >>

Blood Letting In High-ferritin Type 2 Diabetes : Effects On Insulin Sensitivity And -cell Function

Blood Letting In High-ferritin Type 2 Diabetes : Effects On Insulin Sensitivity And -cell Function

Scope: To investigate intestinal markers of iron absorption in morbidly obese subjects according to glucose tolerance.Methods and results: Gene expression of both non-heme [SLC40A1 (ferroportin), SLC11A2] and heme iron [SLC46A1 (HCP1), HMOX1] transporters were analysed in 38 small intestine tissue samples [11 with normal glucose tolerance, 14 with glucose intolerance (GI) and 13 with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D)]. SLC40A1 (r = 0.43, p = 0.008) and SLC11A2 (r = 0.35, p = 0.03) mRNA levels were positively correlated with ferritin-to-hepcidin ratio and with fasting glucose, being significantly increased in patients with T2D. Only ferroportin was negatively associated with serum hepcidin (r = -0.617, p<0.0001). In multivariate regression analysis, fasting glucose contributed independently to intestinal SLC40A1 (p = 0.009) and SLC11A2 (p = 0.04) variance after controlling for age, sex and BMI. When circulating hepcidin was incorporated into the model, fasting glucose contributed significantly and independently to intestinal SLC40A1 (p = 0.02), but not to SLC11A2 (p = 0.07) variance. SLC46A1 and HMOX1 were similar in all groups.Conclusion: The expression of ferroportin and SLC11A2 is increased in the intestine of patients with T2D in association with iron stores and serum hepcidin levels. Increased intestinal iron absorption is a potential mechanism which could explain the increased body iron stores frequently observed in patients with T2D. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Diabetes in whites of European descent with hemochromatosis was first attributed to pancreatic siderosis. Later observations revealed that the pathogenesis of diabetes in HFE hemochromatosis is multifactorial and its clinical manifestations are heterogeneous. Increased Continue reading >>

High Ferritin And Glucose Metabolism In Diabetes - A Case Report.

High Ferritin And Glucose Metabolism In Diabetes - A Case Report.

Endocrine Abstracts (2015) 39 EP51 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.39.EP51 High ferritin and glucose metabolism in diabetes - a case report. Author affiliations View ePoster Download ePoster Chesterfield Royal Hospital, Chesterfield, UK. Iron is a transition metal that acts as an oxidant. There is evidence that systemic iron overload could contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism. Further research has showed that iron overload can result in an increased in type 2 diabetes irrespective of the cause of gene involved. Although the exact mechanism of iron-induced diabetes is uncertain, it is likely mediated by these three mechanisms: i) insulin deficiency, ii) insulin resistance, and iii) hepatic dysfunction. Insulin stimulates cellular iron uptake through increased transferrin receptor externalisation. Thus, insulin and iron can mutually potentiate their effects, leading, after a vicious cycle, to insulin resistance and diabetes. Furthermore, a decrease in insulin resistance has been documented after iron depletion in type 2 diabetic patients. Majority of the current literature discusses the relation between high ferritin and type 2 diabetes but few describe the relation between elevated ferritin levels and type 1 diabetes. In this novel case study, we question the significance of high ferritin levels and type 1 diabetes in an 11-year-old boy whose first presentation was with pain in his hands which worsen in hot weather and exercise. His high ferritin levels (300630 g/l) persisted and he presented again 7 months later with testicular pain and poor urinary stream and was reviewed by the Urologist. Four years later he presented with type 1 diabetes. To date he has displayed poor diabetic control and high ferritin. In the UK, there is has been an increasing prevalence of type 2 Dia Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Serum Ferritin And Insulin Resistance In Different Glucose Metabolism In Nonobese Han Adults

The Relationship Between Serum Ferritin And Insulin Resistance In Different Glucose Metabolism In Nonobese Han Adults

International Journal of Endocrinology Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 642194, 5 pages Department of Endocrinology, The First Hospital of Qinhuangdao, No. 258 Wenhua Road, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066000, China Academic Editor: Michael Horowitz Copyright © 2015 Bo-wei Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The exact mechanism through which elevated serum ferritin promotes the development of type 2 diabetes is unknown. This study showed that ferritin concentration in impaired glucose regulation and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus subjects of nonobesity already significantly increased when compared with normal glucose tolerant subjects of nonobesity. Elevated serum ferritin levels are associated with insulin resistance and may be not associated with the decline of insulin beta cells in different status of glucose tolerance in nonobese Han adults. 1. Introduction Recent studies reported the prevalence of diabetes in China soared from 1.9 to 11.6% between 1993 and 2010 [1, 2]. The prevalence of prediabetes is rising which is an important risk factor for the development of overt diabetes and cardiovascular disease. China has to face the major public health problem and economic burden of potential diabetic patients. Thus, clarifying its etiology and looking for modifiable risk factors are of paramount importance for diabetes control and prevention. Iron is an important mineral in normal physiological processes, and ferritin is a specialized iron storage protein, which reflects iron stores in the body [3]. Serum ferritin (SF) has been found to be a reliable tool, providing that confoun Continue reading >>

Cross-talk Between Iron Metabolism And Diabetes

Cross-talk Between Iron Metabolism And Diabetes

Cross-Talk Between Iron Metabolism and Diabetes Jos Manuel Fernndez-Real, Abel Lpez-Bermejo, and Wifredo Ricart Iron Stores are Associated With Insulin Sensitivity, Insulin Secretion, and Type 2 Diabetes Iron stores, expressed as serum ferritin concentration, have been proposed to be a component of the insulin-resistance syndrome. Indeed, the concentration of circulating ferritin was significantly associated with centrally distributed body fatness as well as with several other measurements of obesity.[ 19 ] In the apparently healthy general population, serum levels of ferritin were also positively correlated with baseline serum glucose and with the area under the curve for glucose during the glucose oral tolerance test.[ 20 , 21 ] In gestational diabetes, both BMI and serum ferritin levels were found to be independent predictors of 2-h glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test.[ 8 , 9 ] Ferritin levels also correlated with diastolic arterial blood pressure, even after adjustment for BMI. Of note is the beneficial effect of blood letting, a means of reducing iron stores, in the treatment of resistant hypertension[ 22 ] and in posttrans plant hypertension associated with erythrocytosis.[ 23 ] Serum ferritin concentration was also directly associated with uric acid (another component of the insulin resistance syndrome) and inversely related with HDL cholesterol and the HDL2-to-HDL3 ratio.[ 21 ] Insulin resistance itself, assessed by either the euglycemic clamp [ 24 ] or the minimal model,[ 25 , 26 ] was found to be associated with total body iron stores, even in the presence of normal glucose tolerance. Dmochowski et al.[ 25 ] reported that serum concentrations of ferritin were negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.58) in subjects with hemosiderosis. Continue reading >>

Elevated Serum Ferritin Level Is Associated With The Incident Type 2 Diabetes In Healthy Korean Men: A 4 Year Longitudinal Study

Elevated Serum Ferritin Level Is Associated With The Incident Type 2 Diabetes In Healthy Korean Men: A 4 Year Longitudinal Study

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Elevated Serum Ferritin Level Is Associated with the Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Healthy Korean Men: A 4 Year Longitudinal Study Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Affiliation Department of International Healthcare Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Affiliation Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea * E-mail: [email protected] (WJL); [email protected] (H-KK) Affiliation Department of Health Screening and Promotion Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Continue reading >>

Does Iron Overload Cause Diabetes And Heart Disease?

Does Iron Overload Cause Diabetes And Heart Disease?

Iron plays an essential role in many physiological processes, including oxygen transport and mitochondrial energy production. However, more iron is not necessarily better! The overaccumulation of iron in the body, a condition referred to as iron overload, has been implicated in the development of several chronic diseases, including diabetes and heart disease. Read on to learn why iron overload promotes the development of diabetes and heart disease and how iron reduction strategies can be used to beneficially alter the course of these diseases. What is iron overload? Iron overload occurs when excess iron accumulates in the body. The most common cause of iron overload is hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), an autosomal recessive genetic disorder that affects between one in 200 and one in 400 individuals and is caused by mutations in the HFE C282Y and H63D genes. (1) HH is characterized by significantly enhanced intestinal iron absorption and the abnormal accumulation of iron in bodily organs. Excess iron oxidatively damages cells and tissues, essentially “rusting” the body. This generates organ toxicity and promotes chronic disease processes. However, a negative test result for the C282Y and H63D mutations does not mean a person is “off the hook” for iron overload. In fact, carriers of HFE mutations and people with moderately elevated iron levels also have an increased risk of health complications associated with iron overload. (2) Alarmingly, research indicates that iron overload may be a significant but greatly underappreciated cause of two widely prevalent chronic diseases, diabetes and heart disease. Iron overload is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome and diabetes The association between iron overload and diabetes was first noted in people with hereditary hemoc Continue reading >>

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